Stat Guy: Horns aren't breaking records

AddThis

Freshman quarterback David Ash (right) completes a pass to Mike Davis (left). Texas quarterbacks only have five touchdown passes combined this year, far from record setting but they are getting better.
Freshman quarterback David Ash (right) completes a pass to Mike Davis (left). Texas quarterbacks only have five touchdown passes combined this year, far from record setting but they are getting better.

Everything is bigger in Texas, especially statistical troubles. With records being shattered week after week all over the country, the Longhorns continue to lurk in the shadows of the college football world, posting modest numbers. While the majority of people would tell you merely winning the game is the most important aspect, putting up significant numbers doesn’t hurt either.

In terms of revving up the crowd, leaving an impression with recruits and swaying pollsters in the teams’ favor, running for 200-plus yards or tossing five touchdowns per week can do leaps and bounds for a program.

Taking a look around the country, there are a number of players leaving their mark on the record books, and some well on their way in it. Lets take a look at some of the players making noise on Saturdays.

Up the road a little ways in Lubbock, Texas Tech quarterback Seth Doege (pronounced DAY-gee, to settle the everlasting debate) recently set the NCAA record of highest completion percentage in one game, recording a 90.6 percent completion rating against New Mexico a month ago. Doege has already passed for 2,608 yards and 22 touchdowns paired with a mere four picks. Doege was the No. 18 quarterback in the 2008 class.

Boise State quarterback Kellen Moore is one win away from breaking Colt McCoy’s all-time wins as a starting quarterback record at 45. With Boise State’s soft schedule, the nation’s 31st-best quarterback from the 2007 class will surely surpass McCoy’s mark.

So why don’t the Longhorns have a quarterback on his way to a 40 touchdown season, or a receiver that consistently goes over the 100-yard mark each time they step on the field? Quarterbacks David Ash and Case McCoy have a combined 910 yards passing and five touchdowns between them. Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III does half of that in one game. Not surprisingly, neither Ash nor McCoy rank in the top-100 nationally in passing. Malcolm Brown’s 516 rushing yards is the 66th-best mark in the nation. Jaxon Shipley is No. 80 with 65 receiving yards a game.

To be fair, the youth of the Longhorns is responsible for some low statistical numbers and, as Brown and Shipley become more experienced, they should become mainstays among the national leaders. But, for now, with the Longhorns finishing with top recruiting classes year after year, it’s surprising the team isn’t putting up bigger numbers.