senior lecturer

Over 200 students evacuate the University Teaching Center after the activation of a fire alarm this morning. Officials said they smelt smoke on the third floor, but no threat was found.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Garza | Daily Texan Staff

Just after 11 a.m. Wednesday morning, more than 200 students and faculty were evacuated from the University Teaching Center, commonly known as the UTC, after a third-floor fire alarm was activated.

According to UTPD officers on the scene, fire marshals smelled smoke on the third floor but ultimately did not find anything.

“[It] smelled like newspaper was burning or something,” UTPD officer Nathan Hish said.

Management senior lecturer John Doggett said he was about to teach a class when the building was evacuated.  

“They said this was not a practice drill,” Doggett said. “I have about 40 unhappy students out here, because we had a great case to talk about, and now we’re not able to do that … but safety is more important.”

Madelyn Mattern, a management information systems senior, said she wishes she had been better informed about the cause of the evacuation.

“We had just gotten started, so it didn’t really disrupt class that much, but I think everybody is a bit anxious because we weren’t told what’s going on,” Mattern said.

UTPD officers gave the all-clear and allowed students back into the building at 11:33 a.m.

The UTC has multiple study spaces and about 30 general purpose classrooms.

Clarification: This story has been updated from its original version. Management senior lecturer John Doggett teaches classes for the McCombs School of Business in the UTC building.

Christine Matyear, energetic teacher, cat-lover and skeet-shooter, died Thursday morning.

Matyear, a senior lecturer in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, died while she was home with her family after fighting ovarian cancer for several months, department chair Craig Champlin said.

Matyear started working at UT in 1998. While teaching in the communications sciences and disorders department, she also taught the subject’s honors sequence, the Senior Fellows Program and signature courses in the School of Undergraduate Studies.

Champlin said Matyear advocated for students and took the vocation of teaching seriously.

“She had high standards and integrity,” Champlin said. “She was very conscious about insuring that learning was occurring. I think students really responded to that.”

Shannon Jacobson, communications sciences and disorders senior, said Matyear always had a smile on her face.

“To me, she embodied the phrase ‘age is just a number,’” Jacobson said. “She was a really passionate person in everything she did, from her cats, to her grandkids and to the classes that she taught.”

Jacobson said she took three classes with Matyear, who always made class engaging.

“Her classes were definitely tough, but they were really fair,” Jacobson said. “Her tests were notoriously hard, but I never felt like it was a burden to study, because she presented the subject material in such a knowledgeable and enthusiastic way.“

Allie Jensen, communications sciences and disorders sophomore, said Matyear was one of a kind.

“She was always super energetic in lecture and made a difficult subject like hearing science easy to understand,” Jensen said. “She had a personal story for every subject we talked about that complemented the massive amounts of information we were learning.”

Jacobson said Matyear also loved her cats. She said she had friends who took an online class with Matyear, and the professor would hold up her cats to the webcam.

Roderick Hart, dean of the College of Communication, said Matyear was of “inestimable” value to the college.

“Her generosity of spirit and breadth of vision will be profoundly missed by faculty and students alike,” Hart said.

Champlin said memorial services will be announced soon.

Printed on Friday, October 5, 2012 as: Senior lecturer dies, known for enthusiasm: Students laud professor's care, accessibility

McCombs School of Business senior lecturer John Doggett discusses economic strategies to eliminate international debt and create new jobs during a lecture for the Texas Enterprise Speaker Series at the AT&T Conference Center on Thursday.

Photo Credit: Skyler Moore | Daily Texan Staff

The United States is experiencing its worst recession since World War II, and education will play a key part in the recovery, McCombs School of Business senior lecturer John Doggett said Thursday.

During his lecture for the Texas Enterprise Speaker Series, Doggett said the U.S. must admit it has a debt problem and dedicate itself to fixing it.

Doggett said the country needs to be aware of the metaphorical “ugly baby” that is our national debt and admit that the U.S. cannot sustain itself by running on creditors’ good graces.

“It’s not a Tea Party issue or a Republican issue or a Democrat issue, it’s a math issue,” Doggett said. “When you’re in business you don’t have the luxury of lying about what’s going on. We are in the midst of the longest and deepest, in terms of jobs, recession for our country since World War II, and our politicians are lying about this ugly baby.”

Doggett said that as the U.S. continued to accumulate a national debt that has reached more than $14.5 trillion, nations that were previously underdeveloped and predominantly communist during the Cold War adopted the United States’ love of capitalism, resulting in economic powerhouses such as China and India that hold most of our debt. Many U.S. citizens hold a grudge instead of capitalizing on the idea, he said.

“They are playing our game and they are playing our song and we’re blaming them,” Doggett said. “That’s the dumbest thing I have ever heard. We are facing competition that has bought into our vision and are executing it in ways we couldn’t imagine.”

One facet of Doggett’s many-tiered solution to jump start the U.S. economy focuses on education and marketing university research.

“The first thing we do is understand the impact of our university system,” Doggett said.

Doggett said he hopes UT will soon become a leader in research that has practical and marketable uses, similar to the far-reaching impact of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s research and innovation.

He said changes in the educational system, coupled with industry changes, can turn the U.S. economy around.

Finance senior Eva Agoulnik said she believes the issues Doggett spoke about tie into many fields and students of all majors should be worried about the national debt crises.
“It’s all one big problem,” Agoulnik said. “It’s all interconnected.”

During his lecture Doggett said UT has been making strides toward marketing its research more effectively, and that research entrepreneurship is a cause he will continue to advocate.

Ruth Shear, program assessor for the Freshman Research Initiative, a new University program that will place freshmen in a research setting, said the University is already taking steps to market its research.

“The Colleges of Natural Sciences has a new dean to develop jobs and companies in the program,” Shear said.
Associate dean for innovation and science enterprises Skip Porter will host two lectures in early October focusing on student research and entrepreneurship, Shear said.

Printed on September 9, 2011 as: Fate of US recession depends on politicians' capacity to face truth