head football coach

Texas picks up another big time recruit

After a rough loss in Manhattan, Kansas, on Saturday, Head Football Coach Charlie Strong was able to pull out a recruiting win on Sunday afternoon when Cameron Townsend, a 2015 4-star OLB from Missouri City announced his commitment to the Longhorns, choosing Strong’s team over Oklahoma and Oregon State.

Townsend’s announcement makes him the 18th commit in the class of 2015, currently ranked 16th in the country and first in the Big 12 by ESPN.

At 6 foot 1, 205 pounds, Townsend has a similar, though slightly leaner, build to current starting linebacker Jordan Hicks, who despite being plagued by injuries the past two seasons has been one of Texas’ most reliable forces on defense. Townsend said one of Texas’ biggest pulls was the fact that he had “a good opportunity to play early” with Hicks’ departure after this season with the coaching staff recruiting Townsend for Hicks’ position.

On film, Townsend shows his explosiveness off the snap and quick feet, proving his reported 4.63 40 time. Townsend also showed good physicality, unafraid to go head to head with the big guys on the line as well as with receivers in the slot. On the pass rush, he comes off the edge well and is able to elude blockers on his path to the quarterback. He also makes good use of a long wingspan to make tackles when one arm is occupied by a blocker. He also shows great natural athleticism, as shown in a game his junior year where he hurdled a lineman en route to a sack.

Townsend also does a great job on the delayed blitz, which accounts for his high tackles-for-loss count.

Though, a few times on his junior year highlight tape he seemed unwilling to finish tackles, applying one hit then letting his teammates bring the ball carrier down. While he can get away with this against high school competition, a tough college running back would make him look silly. He will have to bulk up in the spring and summer, but has the frame and work ethic to get it done.

Overall, Townsend has raw talent and athletic ability that he has been able to get by on in high school. He described his current coaching staff as “offense-minded,” so it could be fun to see what Strong and defensive coordinator Vance Bedford are able to turn him into with some closer technique coaching. Strong has proved this season that he isn’t afraid to play- and even start- true freshman, so don’t be surprised to see Townsend getting quality reps next fall if he can show a good understanding of the defense.

Texas picks up another big time recruit

After a rough loss in Manhattan, Kansas, on Saturday, Head Football Coach Charlie Strong was able to pull out a recruiting win on Sunday afternoon when Cameron Townsend, a 2015 4-star OLB from Missouri City announced his commitment to the Longhorns, choosing Strong’s team over Oklahoma and Oregon State.

Townsend’s announcement makes him the 18th commit in the class of 2015, currently ranked 16th in the country and first in the Big 12 by ESPN.

At 6 foot 1, 205 pounds, Townsend has a similar, though slightly leaner, build to current starting linebacker Jordan Hicks, who despite being plagued by injuries the past two seasons has been one of Texas’ most reliable forces on defense. Townsend said one of Texas’ biggest pulls was the fact that he had “a good opportunity to play early” with Hicks’ departure after this season with the coaching staff recruiting Townsend for Hicks’ position.

On film, Townsend shows his explosiveness off the snap and quick feet, proving his reported 4.63 40 time. Townsend also showed good physicality, unafraid to go head to head with the big guys on the line as well as with receivers in the slot. On the pass rush, he comes off the edge well and is able to elude blockers on his path to the quarterback. He also makes good use of a long wingspan to make tackles when one arm is occupied by a blocker. He also shows great natural athleticism, as shown in a game his junior year where he hurdled a lineman en route to a sack.

Townsend also does a great job on the delayed blitz, which accounts for his high tackles-for-loss count.

Though, a few times on his junior year highlight tape he seemed unwilling to finish tackles, applying one hit then letting his teammates bring the ball carrier down. While he can get away with this against high school competition, a tough college running back would make him look silly. He will have to bulk up in the spring and summer, but has the frame and work ethic to get it done.

Overall, Townsend has raw talent and athletic ability that he has been able to get by on in high school. He described his current coaching staff as “offense-minded,” so it could be fun to see what Strong and defensive coordinator Vance Bedford are able to turn him into with some closer technique coaching. Strong has proved this season that he isn’t afraid to play- and even start- true freshman, so don’t be surprised to see Townsend getting quality reps next fall if he can show a good understanding of the defense.

Bill Little, special assistant to the head football coach for communication, will retire Sunday after 46 years with the Texas athletics department. The football and baseball press boxes will be named the Bill Little Media Center in his honor. 

Photo Credit: Lauren Ussery | Daily Texan Staff

Seven years ago, Bill Little, special assistant to the head football coach for communication, made a promise to then-athletic director DeLoss Dodds and head football coach Mack Brown.

The longtime sports information director committed to stay at Texas for as long as Dodds and Brown did.

But, last January, just a few months away from turning 72, Little and his wife, Kim, realized that promise had been fulfilled.

“In January, I looked up, and both DeLoss and Mack were gone,” Little said. “A new group of people were coming in, and they needed their own people to do their own thing. So [Kim and I] said, in the words of Coach Royal, ‘Let’s just set our bucket down.’ And that’s what we decided to do.”

On Aug. 31, Little will retire, and, for the first time since 1968, he will no longer be an employee of Texas athletics.

The legendary wordsmith, who worked as a commentary writer and special assistant to Brown for the past seven years, saw the reigns of five football coaches, five basketball coaches and four athletic directors during his time in Austin. He attended 36 bowl games with the Longhorns and broadcasted more than 1,700 baseball games. Even Little’s honeymoon consisted of accompanying the Longhorns’ basketball team to New York during their NIT trip in 1978. But, after seeing six decades come and go at Texas, Little thought it was the perfect time to leave.

“It’s always hard to step away,” Little said. “But the timing was just perfect. I always said I never wanted to leave anywhere bitter, and that has always been important to me. The opportunity seemed right for the new administration — for Coach Strong and for everyone. It was a hard decision, but it was also an easy decision.”

Little grew up in Winters, a small town south of Abilene that encompasses under three square miles and has a population of just more than 2,500. After growing up a Longhorn fan, he followed in the footsteps of both his parents and began his college career at Texas in 1960.

As a student, he majored in journalism and worked in the sports information director’s office, creating a close friendship with football coach Darrell K Royal that would span until his death in 2012. In addition, he served as the sports editor of The Daily Texan for two years, witnessing Royal’s first national championship in 1963.

In 1968, at 26, Little started his full-time career at Texas as an assistant sports information director after a job interview that lasted just two sentences.

“I saw there was this really good job in public relations at the University of Texas,” Little said. “I called Coach Royal, and I said, ‘Coach, I want to come back.’ And he said, ‘I’d like to have you back.’ And that was the extent of it. I started that spring.”

Unknowingly, Little would spend the next 46 years involved in Texas sports. Ironically, though, sports weren’t Little’s passion. His passion stretched through sports to the stories that could be told and the people who were discovered through the game.

“I knew I loved journalism, and I knew I loved to tell the story,” Little said. “What I found in sports was the human element. It’s the conquest of the human spirit. It makes you love the game — whatever it is — and you cry with it, whether you win or lose.”

Little wanted to make a difference through his work and through his words.

“I always found that, if you can write something that can make a difference to somebody, it can change a life,” Little said. “I was a bad golfer and a worse tennis player. And I wasn’t big enough to play football, and I was too short to play basketball, so my only gifts were to write and talk. And, if I was going to do what God put me on this planet to do, then I needed to do those things.”

Little made that difference he was seeking and influenced so many around him that the football and baseball press boxes will now be named the Bill Little Media Center. A significant gift from longtime athletics supporter Marian Dozier created the funds to honor Little.

“It means so much to be able to honor my great friend Bill in this way,” Dozier said. “This naming will help honor his immense life work, the legacy he has left nationally on sports media and hopefully motivate young people to follow their passions in work and life.”

With his retirement approaching, Little — who has three children and ten grandchildren, all of whom are Texas fans — is ready to step away. He still hopes to stay involved with Texas athletics, though, by announcing home baseball games and doing radio work. He’s also written seven books on the Longhorns and hopes to finish a few more during his new free time. 

“Texas athletics has pretty much been my life for close to 60 years,” Little said. “This fall will mark the first time since 1957 I haven’t covered football for somebody. But now, I think I’ve earned the chance to set my bucket down.”

Photo Credit: Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff

Just days after Charlie Strong was introduced as the University’s new head football coach, booster Red McCombs took to the airwaves to voice his thoughts on the new hire. In an interview with ESPN 1250 San Antonio, McCombs, a former owner of the San Antonio Spurs, Denver Nuggets and Minnesota Vikings, described the University’s decision as a “kick in the face.”

“I don’t have any doubt that Charlie is a fine coach. I think he would make a great position coach, maybe a coordinator. But I don’t believe [he belongs at] what should be one of the three most powerful university programs in the world right now at UT-Austin,” McCombs added.  

McCombs’ comments came off as insensitive, pompous and racist given that he reacted so strongly to the hiring of Strong, the University’s first African-American men’s head coach and only the second African-American head coach in school history. To say that Strong isn’t the right man for the job is one thing, but to dismiss his accomplishments as only warranting a position coach or coordinating job is downright degrading.

Bryan Davis, a government senior and president of the Society for Cultural Unity, felt McCombs’ remarks were “subjective, personal and rooted in something other than football commentary.”  

Kevin Cokley, a professor of educational psychology and of African and African diaspora studies, added, “I think Strong will probably be scrutinized even more closely than perhaps a white coach, in part to see how he deals with the influential big-money boosters who are part of the ‘white Texas good ole boy’ club. Also, given the negative stereotypes that exist about African-American intelligence I would not be surprised if some critics start questioning his play calling and his decision making to a greater degree than occurred with Mack Brown.”

Even though McCombs is the only booster who has publicly spoken out against Strong, it is an indication of the uphill battle to come, especially when considering the fate of the University’s last and only other African-American head coach, Bev Kearney.

Kearney, who filed a $1 million lawsuit against the University, claims she was fired for having a consensual relationship with a student-athlete, while other UT white male employees in similar relationships — particularly Major Applewhite — did not face equal disciplinary action. 

The University has failed to clearly illustrate why Kearney was fired while Applewhite merely received a pay cut for committing the same offense. So it seems as if race and gender play a bigger role in the case than the University is letting on. 

Though the University has only had two African-American head coaches, it is important to note how both have faced questionable treatment seemingly because of their race. From McCombs’ dismissive comments about Strong’s accomplishments to the University’s handling of Kearney’s consensual student relationship, it’s commendable that Strong still wants to accept the position. 

When asked about McCombs’ comments, Strong replied, “There are going to be statements made … once you win some football games, you’re going to change a lot of people’s attitudes.” 

However, there are many people on campus whose opinions differ from McCombs’. 

Curtis Riser, a physical culture and sports sophomore and offensive guard on UT’s football team, said, “I’m glad to have our first African-American [men’s head football coach] at Texas. [Red McCombs] is entitled to his own opinion, but I’m just happy to move forward with our new coach.” 

But under no circumstances is the hiring of Strong enough to compensate for the disproportionately low number of African-Americans on campus. After all, the football team was predominantly black before Strong’s arrival. When the presence of black males at UT expands beyond the football field, then and only then will true progress be made.

“The hiring of Charlie Strong is certainly wonderful and is very exciting for UT. However, I would caution us to not make this a panacea for race relations,” Cokley said.  

Even if Strong’s presence doesn’t immediately fix race relations at UT, having a man of color in a position of such power is monumental, given that black males make up less than 2 percent of the University’s total population. 

“UT hiring its first black football coach is symbolic in terms of exhibiting black leadership that has potential to further discourse about race relations here,” Davis said.  

McCombs has since apologized for his derogatory comments about the hiring of Strong, but his insistence that he was unaware of the racist undertones of his comments further emphasizes that race relations continue to be an issue at UT. While McCombs has taken responsibility for his actions, as a man whose name is plastered across the University’s business school, McCombs should exercise better judgment. 

Johnson is an undeclared junior from DeSoto.

Photo Credit: Joe Capraro | Daily Texan Staff

Monday morning the UT System Board of Regents approved the contract and compensation package for head football coach Charlie Strong.

Strong’s deal starts at an annual base salary of $5 million per season, and will increase by $100,000 annually starting in his second season. 

His contract also includes a payment for his $4.375 million buyout from Louisville; the first time Texas has paid a buyout in program history. 

In total, UT will spend a guaranteed $9.375 million on Strong in 2014, which ranks among the most a university has paid for a coach in a single season. If UT terminates his contract during the five years without cause, he will receive 100 percent of his remaining salary, as long as he does not find other employment. Including the buyout, his deal is for five years and worth at least $29.375 million. In comparison, Nick Saban received a $32 million guaranteed deal from Alabama when he signed an eight-year contract in 2007.

Strong’s contract also includes academic and on-field performance bonuses. Over the year, if his team maintains a GPA of a 2.90-2.99, he will receive $25,000; 3.00-3.09 and he will receive $50,000, and $75,000 if the team maintains a GPA of 3.1 or higher. If the football team finishes with an Academic Progression Rate in the top 10th percentile, he will receive an additional $75,000.

If the Longhorns win the Big 12, he will make $100,000. For an appearance in a bowl game outside a major six-bowl, Strong will earn $25,000, while a victory earns an additional $25,000. 

If Texas appears in a major six-bowl, he will receive $50,000 and $50,000 more with a victory. Playing in the national title game earns Strong $100,000, plus an additional $250,000 if he wins.

If he wins National Coach of the Year he will earn $100,000, and he would make $50,000 for winning any other Coach of the Year honor.

Finally, a Top-10 finish means a bonus of 2 percent of his annual salary for the next season, while a Top-5 finish earns him 3 percent of his salary.

This deal dwarfs the contract Mack Brown signed in his first season in 1998, which earned him $750,000 in his first year. Brown did not break the $5 million mark until 2009, his 12th season as the Longhorns’ coach.

Strong is one of three coaches who will receive an annual salary of at least $5 million for the 2014 season. Had Brown stayed at Texas, he would have made $5.5 million.

Texas football made $109 million in revenue in 2013 and has been the most valuable program in the nation since 2009. This revenue is used to pay coaches’ salaries and other athletic expenses, instead of taxes.

Strong went 37-16 in four years at Louisville, posting a 23-3 over the past two seasons.

Charlie Strong has many important tasks now that he is the head football coach at Texas, but one of his largest will be recruiting. 

Texas has always been a popular destination for high school athletes. In the past five years, the Longhorns have had four recruiting classes ranked in the top five of the nation by Rivals.com. But after a few consecutive disappointing seasons and a 2013 recruiting class that ranked just 24th, one of Strong’s biggest focuses is on regaining that recruiting prestige. “We’ll recruit with fire, and we’ll recruit with passion,” Strong said at his Jan. 6 press conference. 

Strong is in a similar position as Mack Brown was when he first came to Texas in 1998. Brown, coming from North Carolina, had few ties to Texas. 

But despite the lack of a Lone Star background, Strong looks to regain the Longhorns’ large recruiting presence in-state, which has started to drift in favor of Baylor and Texas A&M in recent years. 

“Nationally, the Texas high school coaches are king,” Strong said. “My staff and I will be committed to closing the borders on this great state and making them realize that this is their program. We’re devoted to making Austin the state capitol for college football.”

While not a priority, Strong will also look to expand his recruiting base outside of Texas. Strong, who has 31 years of coaching experience under his belt, spent several years at Florida, which has opened up the state as a large recruiting playground for his teams. 

In past years, he has had little trouble recruiting in Florida and stealing top athletes from hometown schools, such as Florida, Florida State and Miami. During his four years in Louisville, 44 percent of his recruits came from Florida, and he will look to continue that strong presence while at Texas. 

Still, Strong’s main precedence is controlling his own backyard. 

“I want to make sure that I control this state, and then we’ll cherry pick outside the state in Florida because of the ties that I’ve had in Florida or Georgia,” Strong said. “But I want the high school coaches to understand that when we leave this state, don’t think your player isn’t good enough to play here because I want the best players.”

Only a week into his new job, Strong’s program has already had some big news on the recruiting front. Three four-star defensive tackles decommitted from Texas last week, following the news that defensive line coach Bo Davis would be leaving UT to fill the same role at USC. Trey Lealaimatafao and Courtney Garnett made their decisions last Tuesday evening. 

Then there was the Zaycoven Henderson saga. Henderson, another four-star defensive tackle, also decommitted after hearing the news about Davis. But after a conversation with Strong shortly after his decommitment, the Longview native recommitted to Texas. But, less than 24 hours after recommitting to the Longhorns, Henderson changed his mind once again and has now committed to play at Texas A&M.

Despite these recent decommits, Strong is expected to steal other top recruits — that were previously committed to Louisville and other schools — in the coming weeks. The 53-year-old has proven his ability to recognize talent and then develop it further. As he starts his journey at Texas, he should have no trouble bringing top athletes to Austin. 

Photo Credit: Charlie Pearce | Daily Texan Staff

UT men’s head athletic director Steve Patterson approved an eight-person advisory committee and hired a recruiting firm to help the program find a new head football coach, the school announced Wednesday.

The eight members of the committee are listed below.

•    Steve Hicks, vice chairman of the UT System Board of Regents, one of the board’s athletics liaisons and owner and executive chairman of Capstar Partners LLC, a private investment firm.

•    Robert Stillwell, member of the UT System Board of Regents, one of the board’s athletics liaisons, retired partner at Baker Botts LLP and an original director of Mesa Petroleum Co.

•    Michael Clement, accounting professor and faculty representative to the Men’s and Women’s Athletics Councils.

•    Ricardo Hinojosa, United States federal judge for the Southern District of Texas and former member of the University’s Commission of 125.

•    Charles Matthews, former vice president and general counsel of Exxon Mobil and current president of the Texas Exes.

•    Robert Rowling, former member of the UT System Board of Regents and owner and chairman of TRT Holdings Inc.

•    Charles Tate, chairman of Capital Royalty and former member of the executive committee of the University’s Commission of 125.

•    Pamela Willeford, former U.S. ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein and former chairwoman of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

Patterson also hired Hughes of Korn/Ferry International to assist with the search.

Other than the addition of Hinojosa, the football coach advisory committee is a replica of the athletic director advisory committee that hired Patterson in November.

President William Powers Jr. said Sunday that the decision will be made by Patterson. The new coach will replace head coach Mack Brown, who formally announced Saturday he will be stepping down after the Longhorns' matchup with the Oregon Ducks in the Valero Alamo Bowl on Dec. 30. Brown indicated on Sunday that he won't have a part in picking the next coach unless Patterson and Powers ask him to.

While the decision will be made by Patterson, the Board of Regents must approve the salaries of any employees who will make more than $250,000 per year. Brown was making $5.4 million per year.

University of Texas president William Powers Jr. expressed his support for Longhorns head football coach Mack Brown on Thursday, ensuring everyone that his job security is not in question.

“Now that the Longhorns football team has finished its regular season, there has been an increase in media speculation about Coach Mack Brown’s future,” Powers wrote on his Tower Talk blog Wednesday afternoon. “I’d like to state unequivocally that Coach Brown has my full support as well as the support of Men’s Athletics Director DeLoss Dodds. Put succinctly, Mack Brown is and will remain the Longhorns’ head football coach.”

Brown has served as Texas’ head football coach since the 1998 season, going 149-43 (.776) in 15 years. After nine consecutive 10-win seasons, which included the program’s fourth national championship in 2005 and a national title game appearance in 2009, the Longhorns have posted a 21-16 record over the last three seasons.

The Longhorns (8-4) will face Oregon State (9-3) in the Valero Alamo Bowl on Dec. 29.

“Coach Brown restored Texas’ winning tradition,” Powers continued. “He embodies the Texas character, is a superb ambassador for The University of Texas, and runs a program that is both winning and clean, a program that all alumni and fans can and should be proud of.”

Powers isn’t the only one to publicly voice support for Brown recently. Prominent UT booster Red McCombs told The Daily Texan last Wednesday that he did not anticipate Brown leaving any time soon.

“I think we’ve been blessed to have Mack Brown as our coach,” McCombs said over the phone. “I expect him to be the coach for many years. In any event, if he were to leave the coaching job, I’d expect that to be his prerogative and not somebody else’s. Any reports to the contrary are unfounded.”

Brown, who made $5.3 million this year, agreed to a contract extension last year through 2020. If he were to be fired before Dec. 31, his buyout would cost $3.5 million. If Brown was fired before the end of 2014, he would be owed $2.75 million, a number that goes down to $2.25 million at the end of 2016 and $2 million at the end of 2017.

“Mack cares about the young men on the team as people, students, and as players, in that order, and he models the kind of leadership that will serve our players for the rest of their lives,” Powers wrote. “I look forward to watching this young team win the Alamo Bowl and continue to grow in the seasons to come.”

UT president backs Mack Brown, says he will keep his job as Longhorns head football coach

University of Texas president William Powers Jr. expressed his support for Longhorns head football coach Mack Brown on Thursday, ensuring everyone that is job security is not in question.

"Now that the Longhorns football team has finished its regular season, there has been an increase in media speculation about Coach Mack Brown's future," Powers wrote on his Tower Talk blog Wednesday afternoon. "I'd like to state unequivocally that Coach Brown has my full support as well as the support of Men's Athletics Director DeLoss Dodds. Put succintly, Mack Brown is and will remain the Longhorns' head football coach."

Brown has served as Texas' head football coach since the 1998 season, going 149-43 (.776) in 15 years. After nine consecutive 10-win seasons, which included the program's fourth national championship in 2005 and a national title game appearance in 2009, the Longhorns have posted a 21-16 record over the last three seasons.

The Longhorns (8-4) will face Oregon State (9-3) in the Valero Alamo Bowl on Dec. 29.

"Coach Brown restored Texas' winning tradition," Powers continued. "He embodies the Texas character, is a superb ambassador for The University of Texas, and runs a program that is both winning and clean, a program that all alumni and fans can and should be proud of."

Powers isn't the only one to publicly voice their support for Brown recently. Prominent UT booster Red McCombs told The Daily Texan last Wednesday that he did not anticipate Brown leaving any time soon.

"I think we've been blessed to have Mack Brown as our coach," McCombs said over the phone. "I expect him to be the coach for many years. In any event, if he were to leave the coaching job, I'd expect that to be his perogative and not somebody else's. Any reports to the contrary are unfounded."

Brown, who made $5.3 million this year, agreed to a contract extension last year through 2020. If he were to be fired before Dec. 31, his buyout would be $3.5 million. If Brown was fired, before the end of 2014, he would be owed $2.75 million, a number that goes down to $2.25 million at the end of 2016 and $2 million at the end of 2017.

"Mack cares about the young men on the team as people, students, and as players, in that order, and he models the kind of leadership that will serve our players for the rest of their lives," Powers wrote. "I look forward to watching this young team win the Alamo Bowl and continue to grow in the seasons to come."

Column

Texas A&M will make the transition to the SEC with a new head football coach.

Mike Sherman was fired Thursday, a week after the Aggies wrapped up their regular season with a 27-25 loss to the Longhorns. Texas A&M awaits a bowl invitation at 6-6, a disappointing mark for a team that came into the season ranked in the top 10 of this year’s pre-season polls. Sherman posted a 25-25 record in four years as the Aggies’ head football coach, the first two of which resulted in losing records before a nine-win season that preceded this year’s flop.

Not only did Texas A&M lose half of their regular season games this year but they did so in excruciating fashion, as blowing second-half leads became a trademark of Sherman’s squad. The Aggies blew double-digit leads in five of their six defeats, including a 17-point advantage that was erased by Oklahoma State in the first meeting of top-10 teams at Kyle Field since 1975.

Texas A&M had a 35-17 halftime lead over Arkansas, a team that was ranked No. 3 in the nation a week ago. Two overtime losses, including a quadruple-overtime, heartbreaking 53-50 loss to Kansas State, didn’t help Sherman’s case.

But the nail in the coffin was likely the two-point defeat Texas handed his Texas A&M team this Thanksgiving. In the final meeting against the Longhorns before the Aggies leave the Big 12, Texas A&M scored the game’s first 13 points before being outscored 17-0 in the third quarter and watching Justin Tucker hit a 40-yard game-winning field goal as time expired. With that gut-wrenching loss taking place in College Station, Sherman was unable to survive that game, his last as the Aggies’ head coach.

The frontrunner to replace Sherman is former Texas A&M offensive coordinator Kevin Sumlin, who has led Houston to a 12-0 record and likely a BCS berth should the Cougars beat Southern

Mississippi in the Conference USA title game Saturday. But the Aggies could use a defensive-minded SEC man like Alabama defensive coordinator Kirby Smart, whose name was been associated with several head coaching openings, including the one at Mississippi.

Mississippi State head coach Dan Mullen could get a call from College Station, but there’s a good chance he leaves Starkville for Penn State. And don’t count out Louisville head coach Charlie Strong, who was a Texas A&M graduate assistant in 1985.

Sherman should land on his feet as he is still respected as an impressive offensive mind. He’s even rumored to be in the running to become the Jacksonville Jaguars’ head coach. The Aggies owe Sherman $5.8 million as their athletic department continues to rack up costs with the exit fee to join the SEC set at $28 million, although it’s believed to be negotiable.

But the millions that Texas A&M is willing to pay to part ways with Sherman goes to show how much pressure the fans put on it to replace him and how badly the Aggies felt that they needed a new head football coach.