Tea Leaf

Bracket busting begins today, sans Texas; play with us at dailytexanonline.com

Photo Credit: Stephanie Vanicek | Daily Texan Staff

Join our bracket pool — submissions are due Thursday — and see how you stand within the UT community. Winner gets a $20 gift card to The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. You don't need to be a UT student to play, but you will need to come by the TSM building to pick up your prize once the dust settles and a winner is decided upon.

University of Texas bracket, hosted by The Daily Texan.

Get in on the madness with us: Fill out your bracket for the chance to win a prize

Bracket busting begins today, sans Texas; play with us at dailytexanonline.com
Bracket busting begins today, sans Texas; play with us at dailytexanonline.com

Even though your Longhorns are left out of the NCAA tourney this year, you still have the chance to win big.

Join our bracket pool — submissions are due Thursday — and see how you stand within the UT community. Winner gets a $20 gift card to The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. You don't need to be a UT student to play, but you will need to come by the TSM building to pick up your prize once the dust settles and a winner is decided upon.

University of Texas bracket, hosted by The Daily Texan.

 

Federico Archuleta holds a cardboard stencil of Buddy Holly in his garage studio in East Austin. Archuleta, whose work can be found on walls across the city, was permitted by the new owners of the old Tower Records building on the corner of 24th and Guadalupe to touch up his original murals.

Photo Credit: Ryan Edwards | Daily Texan Staff

The murals of iconic musicians at the intersection of 24th and Guadalupe streets will be preserved with the opening of four new businesses at the location.

The original artist Federico Archuleta said he was able to preserve and touch up the paintings this weekend thanks to the support of the manager at the Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf that will be opening in the space. He started stenciling in 2003. That same year, he drew the mural when Tower Records owned the building, just three months before the music store went out of business and was replaced by the bookstore Intellectual Property.

Archuleta said he painted the murals as a tribute to some of his favorite artists and included portraits of music greats such as Johnny Cash, The Clash and Bob Dylan.

“I tried to tip my hat to a variety of artists, including blues, rock and country,” Archuleta said. “Right before Intellectual Property opened, I took it upon myself to redo the stencils in different colors, and that has been the version that’s been around for the past few years.”

Archuleta said he was pleased to see the artwork has remained intact throughout the years and become an iconic image in the campus community.

“The response of the public has been very supportive, and it’s inspired me to continue maintaining the murals,” he said. “These have really become the ground zero for this type of art, and people do consider it a landmark of sorts.”

Archuleta said growing up near the border in El Paso influenced his artistic style, a blend of Mexican and American pop culture. He has lived in Austin for 10 years and said people are receptive to public art such as his.

“Whether the art stands the test of time remains to be seen,” Archuleta said. “You do your labor of love and you hope somebody cares enough to value it and say it is part of the city’s heritage and should be preserved.”

He said he strives to create art that is culturally meaningful and adds visual interest to his surroundings.

“If it’s not done well, people will just see it as graffiti,” Archuleta said. “I’m more than glad to be able to do the art a third time around so a new generation of students can experience it.”

Preserving art around the city is an important part of maintaining Austin’s individuality, accounting senior Brittney Rodriguez said.

“A lot of the art around campus buildings and things that are on the drag are most memorable to me because I see them every day,” Rodriguez said. “Austin is known for its creativity in all forms of art and I think keeping these murals will help preserve the city’s characteristic of being artistic.”

Communication sciences and disorders senior Behnaz Abolmaali said she hopes to see the culture of public art continue to thrive in the Central Austin area to differentiate it from more traditional suburban neighborhoods.

“I’ve lived in Austin my whole life, and these pieces of art are Austin fixtures,” Abolmaali said. “I would be glad to see the paintings be touched up and stick around for more years to come.”

Printed on 07/18/2011 as: Pop Art Preservation

Bill John of RJ Allen & Associates stains wood panelling for the interior of The Coffee Bean on Wednesday. Currently, Employees of BC Watts, the original contracting team hired to rework the buildingÂ’s original shell, are setting up the utilities in preparation for mid-July openings.

Photo Credit: Ryan Edwards | Daily Texan Staff

The building on 24th and Guadalupe streets that formerly housed Follett’s Intellectual Property bookstore will be home to The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, Qdoba Mexican Grill and Noodles & Company this summer after construction is completed.

The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf will probably open for business the third week of July, said Anita Howard, controller and marketing director for Lone Star Bean, which operates The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf franchises in Texas. The company collaborated with the other businesses sharing the space from the start to make better use of the building, Howard said.

“We’re doing things like having shared bathrooms to make it where we’re all not just operating independently, but approaching it as a team,” she said.

Howard said the cafe’s first floor corner location with an entrance on each street will offer convenience to students, as will accepting Bevo Bucks.

David Lovey, an electrician working at the site, said the heat has affected the speed of construction.

“It’s slowed us down quite a bit,” Lovey said. “The guys get tired faster and have to stop for water [more frequently].”

Three new restaurants will debut next spring in the space where Follett’s Intellectual Property bookstore once stood on the corner of 24th and Guadalupe streets. The space will host The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, Qdoba Mexican Grill and Noodles & Company.

Anita Howard, controller and marketing director for Lone Star Bean, which will operate The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, said the presence of three tenants in the building has created unique challenges.

“The planning process has taken a little longer, but we are all pleased and excited about this location,” she said.
The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf cafe will likely begin construction in December, Howard said. Construction and set up will take about three months, putting the opening time at around early March. The store, the sixth in the Austin area, will occupy the ground-level corner location on 24th and Guadalupe streets, with an entrance on both streets. Howard said the local franchise chose the location because of heavy foot traffic in the area.

A Starbucks Coffee store sits nearby at the corner of 24th and Nueces streets, but Howard said the store is not afraid of the competition.

“There are lots of potential guests in the area, and we hope to win over our share,” she said.

The Qdoba Mexican Grill will begin construction next month, said Kortney Otten, owner of franchise Q-Up Texas, LLC. The restaurant will be located on the side of 24th and San Antonio streets, directly across from Starbucks. Otten said the new location would give the franchise a greater chance to become involved in the University community.

“We feel that Qdoba brings a not only a good, fast casual alternative option but also complements the food options already in place,” she said.

Noodles & Company will open its first Texas restaurant in late spring, said corporate spokeswoman Jill Preston. The main entrance will be on the east side of the building off of Guadalupe Street.