Larry Porter

Texas running backs coach Larry Porter has been linked to an Oklahoma State scandal in which he allegedly paid players, according to a Sports Illustrated (SI) investigative report.

Oklahoma State is under fire for recent allegations from SI about the school paying players based on performance and compensating them for fake jobs. As many as 20 players were awarded money between 2001 and 2011, according to the article.

Porter is one of many assistant coaches accused of making “straight payments to players” during his stint as a running back coach with Oklahoma State from 2002 to 2004.

The running backs coach is cited twice in the article — once by running back Seymour Shaw and once by safety Fath’ Carter, who both claim Porter gave them money periodically.

Shaw said that Porter gave him $100 “four or five times” and was told to “use the money to get something to eat.” Carter said the coach handed him “a couple of hundred bucks” before fall camp in 2003 to host a pair of incoming freshman at his apartment. NCAA rules prohibit compensation for
both accusations.

“I’ve been made aware of the accusations,” Porter said in an SI statement. “I’m disappointed because they are all absolutely not true. None of that ever happened.” 

Porter is in his first season at Texas. Prior to arriving on the 40 Acres he coached at Arizona State.

Texas men’s athletic director DeLoss Dodds was informed of the allegations last Wednesday and approached Porter to discuss the claims.

“After questioning him on Thursday concerning those allegations, we do not have any issues with him at this time,” Dodds said in a statement.

The SI report came out Tuesday morning and is the first piece in a five-part investigative series in which the sports magazine outlines the 10-month investigation it conducted at Oklahoma State. This part of the series charted the money scandal in Stillwater. The rest of the report includes an in-depth look at academic misconduct, drug use, inappropriate recruiting tactics and the fallout from these misbehaviors.

Texas running backs coach Larry Porter has been linked to an Oklahoma State scandal where he allegedly paid players, according to a Sports Illustrated investigative report.

Oklahoma State is under fire for recent allegations from SI about the school paying players based on performance and compensating players for fake jobs, as many as 15-20 players were awarded money over the span of 2001 to 2011, according to the article.

 Porter is one of many assistant coaches accused of giving “straight money to players” during his stint as a running back coach with Oklahoma State between 2002 and 2004.

The running backs coach is cited twice in the article, both running back Seymour Shaw and safety Fath’ Carter claim Porter gave money to them periodically.

 Shaw stated that Porter gave him $100 “four or five times” while Carter said the coach handed him “a couple of hundred bucks” before fall camp in 2003.

"I've been made aware of the accusations, and I'm disappointed because they are all absolutely not true. None of that ever happened,” said Porter in a statement to Sports Illustrated.

Porter is in his first season at Texas, he previously coached at Arizona State.

Texas men’s athletic director DeLoss Dodds was informed of these allegations last Wednesday and approached Porter about the allegations.

“After questioning him on Thursday concerning those allegations, we do not have any issues with him at this time,” Dodds said in a statement.

Louisiana is key to future Texas recruiting success

The Longhorns are entering a brave new world when it comes to recruiting. The rise of other Texas football programs such as A&M, Baylor and TCU, as well as heavy encroachment by SEC powerhouses like Alabama, means that in-state recruiting will no longer come as easily as it used to. If Texas wants to maintain championship-caliber depth, it has to expand its recruiting footprint beyond the Lone Star State.
 

That expansion starts with neighboring Louisiana.
 

The Longhorns are looking to build a pipeline into the Pelican State this year. They recently hired running backs coach Larry Porter, an excellent recruiter who has deep connections to the state after working the same position at LSU for five years, and have already offered eight of the best high school players from there scholarships.
It’s a major change in direction for the Longhorns, whose roster is made up of 90 percent Texans and only two Louisiana natives, but it is much needed. A&M’s move to the SEC opened the floodgates for SEC intrusion, and the Longhorns need to fight back if they want to remain competitive. A year ago, Texas got Shreveport native Torshiro Davis to decommit from LSU and commit to them right before Signing Day. So landing top commits from their neighbors isn’t an impossible task.
 

The Longhorns are a huge brand. There’s no reason they shouldn’t be able to recruit nationally like Notre Dame or USC, and they seem to realize this. Mack Brown and company have stepped up their out-of-state recruiting the last couple of years, nowhere more noticeably than in Louisiana. If they are unable to land any of these newly targeted recruits, it will be a bad omen for future goals.
 

The Longhorns need to recruit nationally if they want to remain relevant nationally. That all starts now with this 2014 recruiting class. It all starts with Louisiana.
 

Running back Malcolm Brown handles the ball at spring practice.  Brown will be guided in part by running backs Larry Porter, who brings seasoned experience to his first year at Texas.  

Photo Credit: Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff

It was Darrell K Royal who said a football coach is nothing more than a teacher.

Lessons won’t be in short supply for Texas after a string of promotions, hires and new positions in its coaching staff. Among those with new job titles are co-offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach Major Applewhite, co-offensive coordinator/wide receivers coach Darrell Wyatt and assistant coach/running backs coach Larry Porter.

The relevancy of their brag-worthy resumes is undeniable. But the burning question is what the impact of those changes in staff will be on the Longhorns.  

After taking the reins just before the Valero Alamo Bowl, Applewhite will have a bit more time this spring to get a handle on things, particularly the up-tempo offense head coach Mack Brown has been emphasizing. Applewhite is more suited to the quick offensive strategy than former co-offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin, Brown said at a press conference before the start of spring practice.

“I think it’s probably easier for Major to do it, because it had not been a huge part of Bryan’s background and it’s been what Major likes and what he does and it’s been what Darrell Wyatt likes,” Brown said.  

Applewhite will bring his expertise as a former Longhorn quarterback to implement the up-tempo offense and smooth any rumples as the team adjusts to the strategy.  

Like Applewhite, Wyatt also received his promotion just before the Alamo Bowl. He has worked with Texas wide receivers since his hire in January 2011, with two of them, Mike Davis and Jaxon Shipley, posting more than 50 receptions.  

Wyatt has a history of getting results. As co-offensive coordinator/wide receivers coach at Kansas in 2010, Wyatt helped rebuild a team that had lost a quarterback and two wide receivers. He also guided the University of Southern Mississippi to a school record of 428 points in 2009. 

“Texas is the type of place where the sky’s the limit on what you can accomplish,” Wyatt said in a press conference following his hire. “The level of expectations are extremely high and that’s something I will definitely embrace.” 

With returners Davis and Shipley, plus the additions of Jake Oliver, Jacorey Warrick and Montrel Meander, Wyatt has an impressive batch on his hands, and his vision and determination could help propel Texas’ wide receivers to smoother play in the up-tempo offense.  

For Porter, burnt orange is a new color. 

The assistant coach/running backs coach embarks upon his first season at Texas after being hired in January. After graduating from Memphis as a four-year letterer, Porter had coaching stints at Arizona State, LSU, Oklahoma State as well as his alma mater. The running game of his Sun Devils ranked 24th in the nation last season. Four of his running backs were selected in the first three rounds of the NFL draft in three years, from 2004 to 2007. 

“He brings a wealth of experience and has a reputation as one of the best coaches and recruiters in our game,” Brown said after Porter’s hire.  

Porter’s expertise in developing players could be just what the Longhorns need to capitalize on a strong group of backs that has tremendous potential. With the influx of an up-tempo offense, the speed of Malcolm Brown, Johnathan Gray and Daje Johnson will surely be utilized.

The impacts of these new coaching positions will unmask themselves as play begins to pan out, but for now, Texas coaches have plenty to teach. And the Longhorns have plenty to learn.

Published on March 6, 2013 as "Coaching shifts impact play". 

Major Applewhite, who recently took over the playcalling responsibilities, looks onto the field of a previous Texas game. 

When Bryan Harsin was named Texas’ co-offensive coordinator and given play-calling responsibilities in 2011, Mack Brown knew who Harsin’s successor would be.

“I told Major [Applewhite], ‘You need to put yourself in a position as the play-caller every day, because that day is going to come fast, and when it comes, you need to be ready’,” Brown said.

Sure enough, when Harsin got his first career head coaching gig at Arkansas State last month, it was Applewhite who immediately took over his duties as the team’s play-caller and quarterbacks coach. In his first game in his new role, Applewhite’s Longhorns offense stalled in the first quarter of the Valero Alamo Bowl against Oregon State on Dec. 29. But Texas scored touchdowns on each of its final drives, overcoming a 10-point fourth-quarter deficit to beat the Beavers, 31-27.

“It’s not about the X’s and O’s, it’s really just about the culture of our program and demanding more of our guys,” Applewhite said after the Alamo Bowl victory. “Tonight, the way we needed to win the game was to spread them out, throw it, clear some loose lanes for the quarterback to run the ball and be effective.

Applewhite previously served as Texas’ running back coach, leaving a vacancy in the Longhorns coaching staff. It was filled by Larry Porter, who coached running backs at Oklahoma State, LSU and, most recently, Arizona State.

He went 3-21 in the 2010 amd 2011 seasons as the head coach at Memphis and will be working with a talented Texas backfield that includes Johnathan Gray, Malcolm Brown and Joe Bergeron.

“We are very excited to have Larry Porter joining our staff,” Brown said. “During his time at Oklahoma State and LSU, he did a tremendous job recruiting Dallas and Houston. He has also worked with two of our current coaches in [defensive tackles coach] Bo Davis and [offensive line coach] Stacy Searels in previous positions and has been friends with [wide receivers coach] Darrell Wyatt for a number of years.

“I’m just really excited to be joining what I think is the best program in the country,” Porter said. “Having the opportunity to work under a man like Coach Brown, who I look at as a legend in college football, is an honor and a privilege. He has done so much for college football and is so well respected.”

In the Longhorns’ nine wins this past season, they averaged 203.9 rushing yards per game and averaged 5 yards per carry. In their four losses, they ran for 98.5 yards per game and averaged only 3.1 yards per carry.

Harsin heads to an Arkansas State program that has seen each of its last two head coaches hired by SEC squads.

Hugh Freeze, who went 6-6 in his first season as the head coach at Ole Miss this year, was the Red Wolves’ head coach in 2011 while Guz Malzahn was named Auburn’s head coach last month after leading Arkansas State to a Sun Belt title last year.

“He’s a bright young coach with great enthusiasm and passion for the kids and the game. He’ll do a tremendous job at Arkansas State,” Mack Brown said of Harsin. “He feels like it is a great situation for him. We’re happy any time our coaches have the opportunity to be a head coach. I think that is a great reflection of the types of coaches we are fortunate enough to have in our program.”

Among the other coaching changes made include Wyatt being promoted to co-offensive coordinator, making him the first African-American coordinator in Texas history. Offensive line coach Stacy Searels was promoted to assistant head coach for offense and tight end coach Bruce Chambers now handles the primary recruiting coordinator duties, which he previously shared with Wyatt.

Published on January 14, 2013 as "Applewhite takes over play-calling". 

Texas hires ASU's Larry Porter to be running backs coach

Arizona State running backs coach Larry Porter has been hired to the same position at Texas, the school announced Wednesday.

Porter helped the Sun Devils run for 205.3 yards per game in his only season at Arizona State, the 24th-most in the country. He also spent two years as the head coach at Memphis, going 3-21 between the 2010 and 2011 seasons. Before that, Porter coached running backs for 12 years, including three at Oklahoma State and five at LSU.

"We are very excited to have Larry Porter joining our staff," head coach Mack Brown said. "He brings a wealth of experience and has a reputation as one of the best coaches and recruiters in our game. Larry has spent a great deal of time in the Big 12 and SEC and has a strong familiarity with our state and staff. During his time at Oklahoma State and LSU, he did a tremendous job recruiting Dallas and Houston."

Co-offensive coordinator Major Applewhite, previously in charge of coaching Longhorns running backs, took over as play-caller and quarterbacks coach for Bryan Harsin, who was named Arkansas State's head coach earlier this month, leaving a vacancy in Texas' coaching staff. Porter filled that vacancy this week.

"I'm just really excited to be joining what I think is the best program in the country," Porter said. "The future of Texas football is very bright and being able to work with Coach Brown and so many guys I've known and worked with before is an opportunity I couldn't pass up. My family and I are really excited and looking forward to getting started."

A productive running game proved to be very important to Texas this season. In the Longhorns' nine wins this year, they averaged 208.4 rushing yards per game and averaged 5.1 yards per carry. In their four losses, they ran for 98.5 yards per game and averaged only 3.1 yards per carry.

"Having the opportunity to work under a man like Coach Brown, who I look at as a legend in college football, is an honor and a privilege," Porter said. "He has done so much for college football and is so well respected. I'm thrilled to be joining his staff and to be a part of a program that I've had such great admiration for."

While at LSU, Porter coached the likes of Joseph Addai and Jacob Hester and helped the Tigers win a national championship in 2007. He was a part of an LSU staff in 2005 that included current Texas defensive tackles coach Bo Davis and offensive line coach Stacy Searels, who also coached with Porter at LSU in 2006.

Addai ran for a team-high 911 yards in 2005, Porter's first as the Tigers' running backs coach, before being selected in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft by the Indianapolis Colts. Addai was named NFL Rookie of the Year that season while helping the Colts win a Super Bowl.

Oklahoma State had someone run for at least 1,000 yards in each of Porter's three seasons as its running backs coach. Tatum Bell ran for 1,096 yards and 11 touchdowns under Porter's guidance in 2002 and rushed for 1,286 yards and 16 touchdowns in 2003  while Vernand Morency ran for 1,474 yards and 12 touchdowns for the Cowboys in 2005.

Porter's first college coaching job was as Tennessee-Martin's running backs coach in 1998. He spent one year there before serving as Arkansas State's running backs coach from 1999 to 2001. Jonathan Adams ran for 1,004 yards in each of Porter's last two seasons with the Red Wolves, leaving as the program's second-leading rusher.