Jimmy Moore

A heated argument broke out between two men on Guadalupe on Tuesday at 2:15 p.m. near the University Co-op — the fight escalated to physical violence, and then one of the men produced a knife.

UT police officers responded and arrested the man wielding the knife, who was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. The charge is categorized as a second degree felony.

The unarmed man was not cut or stabbed by the 3-inch pocketknife, according to the UTPD report.

UTPD officer Jimmy Moore said the incident poses no immediate risk to students walking up and down the Drag.

“There shouldn’t be more prevalent of a safety risk for people walking by than there would be any other day,” Moore said.

Both men involved in the fight regularly spend long stretches of time on the Drag, Moore said.

The man in possession of the knife was transported to Travis County Central Booking.

A heated argument broke out between two men on Guadalupe Street Tuesday at 2:15 p.m. near the University Co-op — the fight escalated to physical violence, then one of the men pulled out his knife.

UT police officers responded and arrested the man wielding the knife, who was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. The charge is categorized as a second degree felony.

The unarmed man was not cut or stabbed by the three-inch pocketknife, according to the UTPD report.

UTPD officer Jimmy Moore said the incident poses no immediate risk to students walking up and down the Drag.

“There shouldn’t be more prevalent of a safety risk for people walking by than there would be any other day,” Moore said.

Both men involved in the fight regularly spend long stretches of time on the Drag, Moore said.

The individual in possession of the knife was transported to Travis County Central Booking.

As law enforcers on a college campus, UTPD officers are highly aware of the impact alcohol charges can have on a student’s future — something the officers take into account when dealing with underage drinkers, according to officer Jimmy Moore.

Moore said arrests for underage drinking are made at the discretion of the officer, but law enforcement will opt for more lenient options if possible, Moore said.

“Our officers are trained, and they know that they are dealing with kids for the most part, and they can get a sense of if someone knows they did something wrong,” Moore said. “Officers try to make the appropriate decision depending on what’s going on.”

Consumption of alcohol under the age of 21 is a Class C misdemeanor, which guarantees a citation and fine of up to $500. Additionally, underage students caught drinking will be referred to the Dean of Students, who can then mandate an 8-hour drug and alcohol class and 20 hours of community service. 

Moore said a student’s underage status does not guarantee leniency.

“Just because you’re a minor doesn’t mean you’re only going to get a citation,” Moore said.

A public relations freshman, whose name has been kept anonymous, said she was attempting to leave a party earlier this semester when she and her friends, all of whom were minors, were confronted by a UTPD officer who gave them citations.

She was required to complete 12 hours of community service and complete an alcohol education class, which cost her $50. She was also fined $150.

That will not keep her from drinking illegally in the future, she said.

“I was shaken up for a few weeks,” she said. “But then I realized it was such a chance encounter that I feel like it won’t happen again … I’ll just be more careful afterward.”

Organizations such as Know Your Line, a campaign run out of University Health Services, try to reach students before they have a run-in with the law. 

“It’s about helping students who do choose to drink alcohol do so in a way that reduces negative outcomes,” said Guli Fager, University Health Services health education coordinator. 

The penalty adults face for serving alcohol to underage students is stiffer than the penalty those students face for actually drinking alcohol. Violators can face fines of up to $4,000 and up to one year in prison — but UTPD typically does not track down individuals or establishments that sell alcohol to minors, Moore said.

“We include information about where they got the drinks in the report, but it doesn’t necessarily mean we’re going to go to that bar and start trying to find out who sold them the drink,” Moore said. “It all depends on the situation.” 

Photo Credit: Alex Dolan | Daily Texan Staff

The daily emails recounting incidents involving strong odors of alcohol and small baggies containing a “green leafy substance” are the product of the UTPD’s continued crime prevention efforts.

Campus Watch, a service established in 1999 by UTPD, provides summaries of selected information about recent crimes reported.

UTPD Assistant Chief Terry McMahan said the idea for Campus Watch was suggested under the Clery Act, requiring universities to disclose criminal activity happening on campus.

“The intent was to inform the campus community about UTPD activity on campus each day,” McMahan said. “It makes the campus more aware.”

The author of the Campus Watch updates, Officer Jimmy Moore, said he feels the daily posts are more effective as a means of spreading information than the annual reports, which are federally mandated.

“Most universities are required and bound by the Clery Act to report all their violent and significant crimes, but that’s on an annual basis,” Moore said. “It’s really good information, but it’s from the previous year and doesn’t give you much [information] in real time.”

Moore said if the Crime Prevention Unit notices trends of certain crimes occurring in certain locations, UTPD will also increase the number of officers present within the area. The unit also conducts 250 to 300 presentations on campus safety every semester.

“Campus Watch is just one of the many tools we use to reach the public,” Moore said.

Moore said humor was added to the Campus Watch rhetoric shortly after its creation to increase readership.

More than 15,900 people are subscribed to Campus Watch emails, and Moore said the large user base means balancing humor and sensitivity can be a nerve-racking experience.

“You don’t want to offend someone,” Moore said. “You never know who’s out there reading it, so you don’t know what will and won’t offend … knowing your audience is really tough because we have such a broad range. 

Still, Moore said, humor is an important tool for keeping the reports compelling.

“You still try to keep it just witty, funny, where you can keep people involved and keep people wanting to read it,” Moore said. “That way, you can also get the second part of it, which is keeping people informed about what’s going on and keeping them safe.”

Since its inception, nine different officers have been in charge of writing Campus Watch. Moore took over for Officer Darrell Halstead in July of this year.  

Layne Brewster, who works alongside Moore in the Crime Prevention Unit, said Moore has always been an effortlessly funny person.

“Jimmy seriously has a sense of humor,” said Brewster, who is also Moore’s roommate. “He’s a lot quicker with the wit … I’d have to sit at it for a while and think, ‘How can I use this?’” 

Moore, who is being promoted from patrol to sergeant in February, has deep ties with the department.

“I’ve been an officer for about 12 years now,” Moore said. “My father was a recruiting sergeant here and retired after 35 years. I’ve been around the department since I was in diapers.” 

Brewster said she will miss Moore’s approach to Campus Watch. 

“Jimmy is becoming sergeant in February so I’ll have a new person here,” Brewster said. “I told my captains they have to be funny.”

Criminal trespassing, criminal mischief and the most popular crime on campus, theft, have all been reduced on campus since 2000, according to UTPD’s Annual Security Report. 

According to the crime logs, controlled substance abuse and liquor law violations have more than doubled since 2000, while public intoxication has quadrupled. 

The department was unable to speculate on the role Campus Watch plays in crime reduction.

“We like to think what were doing is making a difference, and we’re hoping that it is, but there’s no true way to test and measure that to say it’s because of [Campus Watch],” Moore said. “We are fully aware that the more information we are able to get out to the public and the more knowledgeable they are about crimes, opportunity and how to prevent them the better prepared they are and the less likely they are to leave something alone to have it stolen.”

Moore said the best thing the unit can do to combat this spike is keep the public informed on substance abuse trends and ways to avoid them.

“It all goes back to knowledge,” Moore said. “What are the trends we’re seeing? What are the new substances and drugs people are using and the best way to combat it and what to look for to avoid it? … The knowledge you have can help you to avoid that situation and know exactly what the effects something are and maybe you won’t try it.”

UTPD Officer Jimmie Moore and Dr. Chiquita Watt Eugene, Austin’s Youth and Family Outreach program manager, took part in yesterday’s BFSA-sponsored panel. The discussion addressed how African-American parents should counsel their children to deal with police in the aftermath of the Larry Jackson shooting.

Photo Credit: Joe Capraro | Daily Texan Staff

Songs like “Fuck tha Police” by N.W.A. and “Cop Killer” by Body Count indicate the sentiment most young African-American men feel toward police, said Philemon Brown, president of the Black Faculty and Staff Association, during a Thursday panel discussion examining the relationship between police and the African-American community.

The panel, hosted by BFSA in Gregory Gym, included UTPD officer Jimmy Moore, government senior Wesley Nash and Dr. Chiquita Eugene, citywide manager for Austin’s Youth and Family
Services/Initiatives.

Specifically addressing how officers are to handle confrontational situations, Moore discussed
UTPD training. 

Moore, an African-American, detailed UTPD’s three-level system to incident response and explained what to do and say if stopped by a police officer. 

He said police first try to gain compliance by showing up, known as command presence. If that fails, officers use “verbal judo” to de-escalate situations. Physical action is a last resort and only used if preceding steps fail. 

Bridging the divide between police and the African-American community begins with civic engagement and ends with an added sense of cultural awareness and education for both camps,
Eugene said.

Eugene encouraged audience members to visit police departments with their children to foster an active dialogue and dispel racial tensions with police at a
young age.

“A lot of this combative environment is based on fear,” Eugene said. “Don’t y’all know you’re pretty powerful people? You can cause people to be fearful. And fear is the state of the unknown. Reduce some of that fear. Go to your police stations. It’s good for you, and guess what, it’s good for them, too. Police officers are like us. They’re human too … It’ll give them another perspective when dealing with African-Americans.”

Chas Moore, an activist and former UT student, voiced a more radical position during the question-and-answer portion of the panel. Moore took issue with excessive policing in underprivileged areas and said it would inevitably lead to more police brutality. Moore said communities should ultimately
police themselves.

Cindy Nathan attended the event and said the panel gave her added perspective on racial tension. Nathan, whose grandchildren are African-American, said more white people should have attended the panel.

“I think bridging those relations is a good way to start,” Nathan said, “But, honestly, I would have liked to have seen more white people here. We wrote the system. For us to sit back and say, ‘Okay, now you guys fix it,’ is really, really unfair. We need to get involved, too.”

On Thursday afternoon, the Black Faculty and Staff Association hosted a panel discussion inside Gregory Gym to examine the turbulent relationship between police and the African-American community.

 

The panel consisted of UTPD officer Jimmy Moore, government senior Wesley Nash and Chiquita Eugene, city-wide manager for Austin’s Youth and Family Services/Initiatives.

 

After a recitation of “Lift Every Voice and Sing”, otherwise known as “The Negro National Anthem,” the conversation began with the panel members’ response to a series of questions.

 

Moore began by discussing UTPD training, specifically addressing how officers are to handle confrontational situations. Moore detailed UTPD’s three-level system to incident response and reiterated what to do and say if stopped by a police officer.

 

Eugene said bridging the divide between police and the African-American community begins with civic engagement and ends with an added sense of cultural awareness and education for both camps.

 

Eugene encouraged the audience to visit police departments with their children to foster an active dialog and dispel racial tensions with police at a young age.

 

“A lot of this combative environment is based on fear,” Eugene said. “Don’t y’all know you’re pretty powerful people? You can cause people to be fearful. And fear is the state of the unknown. Reduce some of that fear. Go to your police stations. It’s good for you, and guess what, it’s good for them too. Police officers are like us. They’re human too … It’ll give them another perspective when dealing with African-Americans.”

 

Chas Moore, an activist and former UT student, voiced a more radical position during the question-and-answer portion of the panel. Moore took issue with excessive policing in underprivileged areas and said it would inevitably lead to more police brutality. Moore said, ultimately, communities should police themselves.

 

Attendant and concerned citizen Cindy Nathan said the panel gave her added perspective on racial tension. Nathan, whose grandchildren are African-American, said more white people should have attended the panel.

 

“I think bridging those relations is a good way to start,” Nathan said, “but honestly, I would have liked to have seen more white people here. We wrote the system. For us to sit back and say, ‘Okay, now you guys fix it,’ is really, really unfair. We need to get involved too.”