Cat Osterman

Freshman pitcher Erika Wright might get the chance to square off against her sister, Ashley, this weekend.
Photo Credit: Joshua Guerra | Daily Texan Staff

Texas faces off against Texas State this weekend in a two-game, home-and-home series stitched together by heartstrings.

The matchup will bring together former teammates and place siblings against each other. Cat Osterman, Texas softball legend, will return in her new role as Texas State assistant coach.

For freshman pitcher Erica Wright, who will don her No. 20 uniform proudly, another Wright bearing the same number in the visitor’s dugout will tug at her emotions.

Texas State’s junior pitcher Ashley Wright is Erica’s older sister. They grew up supporting each other and continue to do so despite playing each other at the collegiate level.

“People always ask us, ‘Are y’all really competitive towards each other?’ but, honestly, we’re the exact opposite,” Erica said. “We both want each other to do super well. It’s so great playing her; she’s my best friend.”

With Texas State’s ace, freshman Randi Rupp, throwing so well in recent games, it’s unclear whether the Wright sisters will have a pitcher’s duel this weekend. But that might be helpful for Erica, who said it was tricky to play against her sister in
the fall.  

“I was so nervous — not for me, even though it was my first start,” Erica said. “I was nervous for her, but I wanted us to do well, too, so it was kind of a struggle in that way.”

Other players on the team said they appreciate seeing familiar faces.

Junior center fielder Lindsey Stephens said she enjoys going up against Osterman.

“It’s always fun because when you walk past her, you’re like, ‘What about that hit?’ or, ‘Why’d you throw that pitch at me, Cat?’” Stephens said. “She’s watched us, and she knows our weaknesses and our strengths, so it’s always fun to have that familiar face to kind of pick on.” 

Erica has been one of the team’s strongest players. She earned Big 12 Conference Pitcher of the Week honors for her performance in the sweep of Kansas last weekend, has the best record on the staff at 10–4 and her 2.43 ERA is second best on
the team. 

Texas has dominated the series between the two, winning the last ten meetings. But Stephens said they know they need to keep up their “never quit” attitude.

“Even when we’re down, we have the offense; we have the athletes; we have the depth to keep fighting, to keep competing,” Stephens said. “We’re never out of the game.”

Head coach Connie Clark said she doesn’t think the familiar faces on the other team will be a distraction.

“You have fun before the game,” Clark said. “You hug them up and wish them well, and then you go about your business.”

First pitch of the series will take place Friday night in San Marcos. The second game will take place at Red and Charline McCombs Field in Austin on Saturday afternoon.

Cat Osterman remains one of the best pitchers the Texas softball program has ever had. She currently coaches softball at Texas State and is preparing to wrap up her professional career.
Photo Credit: Griffin Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Editor’s Note: This is part of a weekly series looking back at past Texas athletes and examining where they are now. This week features former softball pitcher Cat Osterman, who played for Texas from 2002-2003 and 2005-2006.

By the time Osterman graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology, she had already won an Olympic gold medal from Athens, notched 20 collegiate no-hitters and appeared twice on the cover of Sports Illustrated.

But even for Osterman, adjusting to life on the 40 Acres wasn’t easy.

“I had to learn real quick how to pitch and how to pitch successfully at that level,” Osterman said. “For me to be able to be thrown in the fire so quick, I think that’s what really made me mature as an athlete and, actually, in the long run, is probably what has allowed me to be so successful.”

Osterman took a year-long hiatus from school after her sophomore year to join the USA Softball Women’s National Team on its quest for Olympic gold in Athens in 2004.  

“It was a little difficult because I was playing with a bunch of older women, a lot of which had graduated from college already,” Osterman said. “But I think it was for the best. It taught me a lot. It made me grow up fast.”

She returned to the University after her Olympic stint to play two more seasons with Texas, and, in 2007, she was selected as the No. 1 pick in the National Pro Fastpitch softball league draft.

She continues to pitch professionally for the USSSA Pride, a fastpitch team in Kissimmee, Florida, while working full-time in the offseason as a softball coach at Texas State. Osterman devotes her time to recruiting in the fall, coaching in the spring and playing professionally in the summer.

“I think the hardest part is I have to work out, and I have to throw,” Osterman said. “I put coaching as a priority, so, if I have to skip a workout or something like that, I’ll do that over being late to practice because my first priority is to Texas State and coaching.”

But all good things come to an end. This summer will most likely be Osterman’s last season playing professionally, she said. Still, she has a clear path for her future in mind. 

“I have wanted to coach since I was in, like, fourth grade, and that was before I specialized in softball,” Osterman said. “Coaching is definitely my future.”

Like the last couple squads before them, Texas was expected to go to the Women’s College World Series. Unlike those previous teams, they did.

Once the Longhorns arrived in Oklahoma City, the expectations were not as well-defined. Two-and-out wouldn’t do but surely no one predicted, much less expected, Texas to win it all. Not with Oklahoma, one of the best teams to suit up in recent memory, on the same side of the bracket.

So Texas did something in between. The Longhorns advanced to the WCWS semis, where they fell to Tennessee, 2-1, on June 2. They began the WCWS the same way they started it in 2006, by beating Arizona State.

Then – after a brief tornado scare postponed it – came the loss to Oklahoma, as expected, before the Longhorns’ last day of the season, when they proved that they were the best team in the history of the program.

It started with a 3-0 win over Florida, marking the first time the Gators were blanked all year. Luna was brilliant in what would be Texas’ 51st and final win of the year, striking out 14 and allowing only one hit.

She was then asked to do something she hadn’t done all year – pitch two complete games in one day. Luna surrendered just two runs on three hits while striking out 12 but issued a season-high eight walks as the Longhorns’ season ended in a one-run loss to the Lady Vols.

It marked the third time Texas advanced to the semis in Oklahoma City, the other two times with Cat Osterman in the circle. While Osterman will go down as the best player in school history, none of her teams can match what the Longhorns did this season.

Each of the top three hitters in Texas’ lineup – Taylor Hoagland, Brejae Washington and Taylor Thom – struggled in the WCWS but hold multiple school records and spearheaded an offense that was much more productive than any of Osterman’s teams.

Luna’s performance on the final day of the season rivaled that of anything Osterman did. The numbers – 288 pitches, 26 strikeouts, four hits allowed over 14 innings – barely scratch the surface of what she accomplished two Sundays ago. She did it all with a tight forearm and a blood blister on her throwing hand. Still, she said she could have lasted at least a couple more innings.

“It is upsetting that we came up short,” Luna said. “I’ve grown so much as a person this year, and I’ve accomplished a lot. I just really couldn’t be any more proud of my team and of myself.”

The 2006 team won more games, the 2003 squad had a better winning percentage and the 2005 group went just as far in the WCWS. All three had the best player to ever put on a Texas uniform.

But the 2013 Longhorns softball team was the best in school history.

Longhorn legend Cat Osterman announces retirement

Former Longhorns pitcher Cat Osterman announced her retirement from competitive softball Tuesday. 

The four-time All-American is the only player in college softball history to win National College Player of the Year three times. After setting Texas school records in career ERA (0.51), wins (136), shutouts (85) and no-hitters (20), Osterman moved on to professional softball, winning a pair of National Pro Fastpitch championships and an Olympic gold medal at the 2004 Athens games.

“As I turn 30 … I’m announcing I will hang up my cleats after this 2013 NPF season,” Osterman tweeted Tuesday, her 30th birthday. “Thank you again everyone for the love and support. I’m blessed. Looking forward to making my last season a good one!”

The only player to ever have the country’s best ERA in three different seasons, Osterman struck out 14.4 hitters per seven innings during her Longhorns career, an NCAA record. She fanned 554 hitters as a freshman in 2002, an NCAA record at the time, before she broke it as a junior and senior. Osterman held opposing hitters to a .095 batting average during her career and recorded
2,265 strikeouts.

When Osterman focused on playing for the U.S. Olympic softball team in 2004, Texas went 24-25, the program’s only losing season in the last decade. Osterman tossed 14 and two-thirds scoreless innings in the 2004 Olympics en route to helping the U.S. win gold.

Osterman, who led the NPF with a 0.72 ERA last season, is currently an assistant coach at St. Edward’s University under former Texas teammate Lindsay Gardner. Osterman and former Longhorns running back Ricky Williams were each inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame
in February. 

Texas had only played five seasons of varsity softball before Osterman arrived. The Longhorns lost both of their games of the only trip to the Women’s College World Series before Osterman led them to the WCWS three times — where they were knocked out by UCLA before the national title round each time — and have not been back to Oklahoma City since.

“She has been the most iconic softball athlete at the University of Texas as well as in the state of Texas,” Longhorns head softball coach Connie Clark said. “We are extremely proud of her and her representation of
our program.”

Former Longhorns pitcher Cat Osterman announced her retirement from competitive softball Tuesday. 

The four-time All-American is the only player in college softball history to win national college player of the year three times. After setting Texas school records in career ERA (0.51), wins (136), shutouts (85) and no-hitters (20), Osterman moved on to professional softball, winning a pair of National Pro Fastpitch championships and an Olympic gold medal at the 2004 Athens games.

“As I turn 30 … I’m announcing I will hang up my cleats after this 2013 NPF season,” Osterman tweeted Tuesday, her 30th birthday. “Thank you again everyone for the love and support. I’m blessed. Looking forward to making my last season a good one!”

The only player to ever have the country’s best ERA in three different seasons, Osterman struck out 14.4 hitters per seven innings during her Longhorns career, an NCAA record. She fanned 554 hitters as a freshman in 2002, an NCAA record at the time, before she broke it as a junior and senior. Osterman held opposing hitters to a .095 batting average during her career and recorded 2,265 strikeouts.

When Osterman focused on playing for the U.S. Olympic softball team in 2004, Texas went 24-25, the program’s only losing season in the last decade. Osterman tossed 14.67 scoreless in the 2004 Olympics en route to helping the U.S. win gold.

Osterman, who led the NPF with a 0.72 ERA last season, is currently an assistant coach at St. Edward’s University under former Texas teammate Lindsay Gardner. Osterman and former Longhorns running back Ricky Williams were each inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in February. 

Texas had only played five seasons of varsity softball before Osterman arrived. The Longhorns lost both of their games of the only trip to the Women’s College World Series before Osterman led them to the WCWS three times — getting knocked out by UCLA before the national title round each time — and have not been back to Oklahoma City since.

“She has been the most iconic softball athlete at The University of Texas as well as in the state of Texas,” Longhorns Head Softball Coach Connie Clark said. “We are extremely proud of her and her representation of our program.”

Senior Blaire Luna pitches against Louisiana-Lafayette last month. Luna, and the rest of the Texas Defense, rank within the top three in every Big 12 defensive
category. 

Photo Credit: Emily Ng | Daily Texan Staff

For the Longhorns, scoring runs has never really been a problem, but for Texas to propel itself deep into postseason play, there’s no question on the importance of defense. 

Texas doesn’t rank higher than third in any defensive standings in the Big 12. Its pitching is first in wins (32) and third in ERA (1.58) while the team ranks second in fielding percentage (.974).

The Longhorns have made a trip to the NCAA Regionals in each of their past eight seasons in large part due to their pitching. The program has been known as a pitching powerhouse since the infancy of the team — especially when Cat Osterman made her first appearance in a Texas uniform in 2002.

Well, while Osterman may not be in that uniform anymore, the Longhorns still have power in the circle with Blaire Luna. The Austin native leads the Big 12 in three categories — wins (17), batting average against (.108) and strikeouts (217).

Luna has proved to be one of the best pitchers to step in the circle, not only for Texas but in the conference. She has 97 careers wins, 1,223 career strikeouts and 43 career shutouts which puts her second — just behind Osterman — in almost all categories for Texas.

Head coach Connie Clark believes Luna and her team’s pitching is one of the main keys to get the team to the Women’s College World Series. This season Clark described that Luna has focused on her mental aspect of the game, which has thoroughly improved her play.

The senior and her teammates have allowed only 65 hits in 36 games this season ranking third in the Big 12. This past weekend during their away stand in Lawrence, Kan., the Longhorns gave up only eight runs on a mere nine hits in 20 innings of play.

The Longhorns have thrown 16 shutouts this season, which is tied for the second most in the program in the past six seasons. The 2012 squad finished with 16 but didn’t reach that mark until late May.

This strong defensive power will be the key to the Longhorns success this season if they can keep it up. The team scores an average of 6.5 runs a game but that doesn’t mean much without a strong presence in the field.

Texas is just as good in the dirt as it is in the circle. The team has 719 putouts — third in the Big 12 — and has 223 assists. When recording a double play in the game the Longhorns are 5-1 and are 17-3 when making no errors in the game.

If Texas continues to shine on defense, there is no question it will have a strong chance to propel themselves to the WCWS for the fifth time in program history.

Senior pitcher Blaire Luna nabbed Big 12 Pitcher of the Week honors two consecutive weeks, her third this season. 

Photo Credit: Sam Ortega | Daily Texan Staff

Senior Blaire Luna received her second straight Big 12 conference Pitcher of the Week award Tuesday, marking the third time this season and the 12th time in her career she has received this award.

This is the first time in her career that she has claimed back-to-back Big 12 Pitcher of the Week honors, and she is the first Texas pitcher to do so since Cat Osterman won three straight in 2006.

This past week, Luna (17-1) notched two victories over Kansas in Lawrence. In the 13 innings she was in the circle, she allowed just four hits to Kansas, who entered the series with the nation’s best batting average, while fanning 18.

In Big 12 play, Luna sports a 4-0 record and 0.48 ERA.

She is the third UT pitcher to ever start a season 17-1, joining Rachel Fox (2011) and Osterman (2006).

Luna has been dominant recently, allowing three hits or fewer in each of her last eight appearances.

Her 1.11 ERA is the 11th-best in the country, her 17 wins are the 10th-most, her 217 strikeouts are the third-best and her 12.7 strikeouts per seven innings are the most in the nation.

Many expected Luna to be the second-best pitcher in the conference behind Keilani Ricketts of Oklahoma, last season’s National Player of the Year. But so far, their performances have been relatively even. Ricketts (15-1, 1.00 ERA) is on par with the Texas ace. They are expected to square off April 19 in Austin.

Luna and the Longhorns (32-4) return to action Wednesday with a 2 p.m. doubleheader against McNeese State after the a doubleheader scheduled for Tuesday was canceled that night.

Alex Okafor lifts the 2012 Alamo Bowl trophy above his head following the Longhorns’ 31-27 victory over Oregon State.

Photo Credit: Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff

The Academy handed out the Oscars on Sunday, but award season isn’t quite over. Texas’ athletic shortcomings in 2012 were well-documented — the football team was crushed by Oklahoma again, the baseball team didn’t make the NCAA tournament and, in the same calendar year, the basketball team was bounced in its first NCAA tournament game and then began the next season without star paint guard Myck Kabongo. There were some, um, silver linings, however. The envelope, please ...

Best Actor - Alex Okafor

Third baseman Erich Weiss and golfer Dylan Fritelli were considered for this, but Okafor’s Alamo Bowl performance put him over the top. The Pflugerville product made 68 tackles, a whopping 18 of them for a loss, including 12.5 sacks and 20 quarterback hurries, both team-highs. The 4.5-sack effort he turned in during Texas’ triumph over Oregon State last December was a fitting end to his career and may have earned him a spot in the first round of April’s NFL Draft.

Best Actress - Blaire Luna

Luna went 22-6 with a 2.31 ERA last year, when she nearly led Texas to its first Women’s College World Series berth since Cat Osterman was on the 40 Acres. Her 10.6 strikeouts per seven innings was good for No. 3 nationally. The ace also became the second Longhorn, along with Osterman, to record 1,000 career strikeouts. 

Best Actor in Supporting Role - Hoby Milner 

Milner started out last season in the Longhorns’ starting rotation but, by the end of the year, he was the team’s setup man. What seemed like a demotion proved to be mutually beneficial for both Milner and his squad. Texas had a reliable option behind closer Corey Knebel and Milner, who admitted to being more comfortable coming out of the bullpen, ended up being drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in the seventh round of last year’s MLB Draft. 

Best Actress in Supporting Role - Hannah Allison

Allison was an essential piece to the Longhorns’ championship puzzle last season. She averaged more than 10 assists per set this past year and had 254 assists in six NCAA Tournament games, including a mind-boggling 53 in the Final Four five-set triumph over Michigan. As great as Bailey Webster, Haley Eckerman and Khat Bell were, Texas would not have won a national title without Allison.

Best Picture - Men’s golf team’s national title win

Texas captured two national championships over the last 12 months, one in volleyball and one in men’s golf. But the Longhorn volleyball team swept Oregon in their national title game, leaving little doubt who the best squad in the country was. The Texas men’s golf squad, on the other hand, provided much more drama on its way to winning a championship. Senior Dylan Fritelli sank a 30-foot, title-clinching birdie putt on the final hole of the Longhorns’ national championship clash with Alabama, sending his teammates in a frenzy and giving Texas its third national title in men’s golf.

Best Director - Jerritt Elliott

After several uncharacteristic losses in non-conference play, Elliott, the head volleyball coach, talked about how he was toying with his lineup, still unsure of what group of players would work. Texas began the year by losing three of its first nine matches, but reeled off 17 straight wins, including a school-record 15 in a row to begin Big 12 play, before falling to Iowa State in five sets in its regular season finale — a loss some players said would actually serve the Longhorns well in the upcoming NCAA Tournament. Sure enough, they blazed their way through the tournament, losing just one set in their first four NCAA Tournament matches, all of which were in Austin, before battling back in a five-set win over Michigan and a sweep of Oregon in the title match. Eddie Reese, John Fields and Augie Garrido are really good at what they do, but Elliott may very well be the best coach on campus.

Handing out Oscars for the best performances in Texas sports this past year

Best Actor - Alex Okafor

Third baseman Erich Weiss and golfer Dylan Frittelli were considered for this, but Okafor’s Alamo Bowl performance put him over the top. In 2012 the Pflugerville product made 68 tackles, a whopping 18 of them for a loss, including 12.5 sacks and 20 quarterback hurries, both team-highs by far. The 4.5-sack effort he turned in during Texas’s triumph over Oregon State last December was a fitting end to his career and may have earned him a spot in the first round of April’s NFL Draft.

Best Actress - Blaire Luna

Luna, a local product from Austin's Bowie High School, went 22-6 with a 2.31 ERA last year, when she nearly led Texas to its first Women’s College World Series berth since Cat Osterman was on the 40 Acres. She’s off to a scorching start this season, going 7-0 with a 0.50 ERA in her first seven outings as the Longhorns (16-1) are off to their best 17-game start in school history. She almost tied her career-high by striking out 16 Tulsa hitters in Sunday’s win without issuing a single walk. Luna and the Longhorns could very well be Oklahoma City-bound in a few months.

Best Actor in Supporting Role - Hoby Milner 

Milner started out last season in the Longhorns’ starting rotation but, by the end of the year, he was the team’s set-up man. What seemed like a demotion proved to be mutually beneficial for both Milner and his squad. Texas had a reliable option behind closer Corey Knebel and Milner, who admitted to being more comfortable coming out of the bullpen, ended up being drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in the seventh round of last year’s MLB Draft. 

Best Actress in Supporting Role - Hannah Allison

Allison was an essential piece to the Longhorns’ championship puzzle last season. She averaged more than 10 assists per set this past year and had 254 assists in six NCAA Tournament games, including a mind-boggling 53 in the Final Four five-set triumph against Michigan. As great as Bailey Webster, Haley Eckerman and Khat Bell were, Texas would not have won a national title without Allison.

Best Picture - Men’s golf team winning a national title

Texas captured two national championships over the last 12 months, one in volleyball and one in men’s golf. But the Longhorn volleyball team swept Oregon in its national title game, leaving little doubt who the best squad in the country was. The Texas men’s golf squad, on the other hand, provided much more drama on its way to winning a championship. Senior Dylan Frittelli sank a 30-foot, title-clinching birdie putt on the final hole of the Longhorns’s national championship clash with Alabama, sending his teammates in a frenzy and giving Texas its third national title in men’s golf.

Best Director - Jerritt Elliott

After several uncharacteristic losses in non-conference play, Elliott, the head volleyball coach, talked about how he has been toying with his lineup, still unsure of what group of players will work. Texas began the year by losing three of its first nine matches but reeled off 17 straight wins, including a school-record 15 in a row to begin Big-12 play, before falling to Iowa State in five sets in its regular season finale – a loss some players said would actually serve the Longhorns well in the upcoming NCAA Tournament. Sure enough, they blazed their way through the tournament, losing just one set in their first four NCAA Tournament matches, all of which were in Austin, before battling back in a five-set win over Michigan and a sweep of Oregon in the title match. Eddie Reese, John Fields and Augie Garrido are really good at what they do, but Elliott may very well be the best coach on campus.

Former Texas running back Ricky Williams and pitcher Cat Osterman were among the people inducted in the Texas Sports Hall of Fame on Monday.

Photo Credit: The Associated Press

WACO, Texas — Shaquille O'Neal was a star in an overlooked Texas sport. Drew Brees was an overlooked player in the star of Texas high school athletics: football.

They were supposed to share a stage Monday night for induction into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame before O'Neal canceled hours after the NBA All-Star game in Houston, citing a family matter.

O'Neal was a four-time NBA champion who won the Class 3A title at San Antonio Cole in 1989. Brees, a Super Bowl-winning quarterback for New Orleans, won a state title at Austin Westlake in 1996.

The agent for the star known simply as Shaq told Texas sports hall officials late Sunday that O'Neal had to fly to California for personal reasons. It wasn't clear whether O'Neal's change of plans was connected to the death Monday of Los Angeles Lakers owner Jerry Buss. O'Neal won three straight titles with the Lakers starting in 2000 and played eight of his 19 seasons in Los Angeles.

The Texas sports hall requires living honorees to attend the ceremony, but Director Steve Fallon said O'Neal's induction would stand. Representatives from his high school were still planning to attend, Fallon said.

"I have been looking forward to this ceremony for months," O'Neal said in a statement released by the hall. "I have a great love for the state of Texas and the city of San Antonio and would have loved to attend in person, if at all possible."

The other inductees Monday were Heisman Trophy winner Ricky Williams and softball star Cat Osterman of the Texas Longhorns, the late baseball Hall of Famer Eddie Mathews, Walt Garrison of the Dallas Cowboys and former Lubbock Monterey baseball coach Bobby Moegle.

O'Neal's fame came after he left Texas, where basketball has always been overshadowed by football. He played at LSU before Orlando made him the top pick in the 1992 draft. He went to the finals with the Magic in 1995, losing to Houston, before joining the Lakers in 1996. He lost in the finals to Detroit with the Lakers in 2004 and won his fourth title in 2006 with Dwyane Wade and Miami when the Heat beat Dallas.

The 40-year-old O'Neal went to LSU before becoming the top pick in the 1992 draft by Orlando. He went to the finals in 1995 with the Magic, who got swept by Houston. He lost to Detroit in the 2004 finals with the Lakers and won his fourth title in 2006 with Dwyane Wade and Miami when the Heat beat Dallas.

Brees went to Purdue after he said he was the "backup plan" for Texas A&M, where he really wanted to go, and Texas. Both those schools signed their first choices at quarterback, so Brees instead remains the Purdue and Big Ten career leader in every major passing category and took the Boilermakers to their first Rose Bowl in 34 years as a senior during the 2000 season. He started his NFL career in San Diego, but left two years after the Chargers drafted Philip Rivers.

The Saints won the Super Bowl in Brees' fourth season with them, and he's now eighth in NFL career passing yards at 45,919 and holds the single-season record of 5,476 set in 2011.

"It all worked out the way it's supposed to," Brees said. "I wouldn't trade it for the world. I've been lucky enough to be able to do some pretty cool things and play football a long time. One of my greatest moments will always be 1996, winning the 5A state championship in the state of Texas."

Williams, a San Diego native, joined Earl Campbell as the only Texas Longhorns to win the Heisman when he won college football's top prize in 1998. He set the NCAA's single-season rushing mark and won back-to-back rushing titles. He finished an 11-season NFL career with 10,009 yards.

"I've been the kind of person that whatever I do I make sure I enjoy it," Williams said. "I squeezed every drop of joy out of my time at Texas."

Osterman, a Houston native, led the Longhorns to three appearances in the Women's College World Series and won 136 games in her college softball career.

Mathews, a native of Texarkana, Texas, was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame after a 17-year career with the Braves in Boston, Atlanta and Milwaukee and brief stints with Houston and Detroit. He hit 512 home runs and played in three World Series, with Milwaukee in 1957-58 and Detroit in 1968. He died at age 69 in 2001.

Walt Garrison, who went to high school in the Dallas area at Lewisville and was a fullback for the Cowboys, retired as the third-leading rusher and fourth-leading receiver for Dallas in 1974. He won a Super Bowl with the 1971 team and was a professional rodeo cowboy and TV pitchman for a smokeless tobacco company.

The 79-year-old Moegle is the winningest high school baseball coach in Texas history and currently ranks fifth nationally with 1,115 victories. He was 1,115-266-1 in 40 seasons at Lubbock Monterey, from 1960 to 1999.