Ben Armstrong

III Corp and Fort Hood Commanding General Mark Milley speaks to press after a shooting at Fort Hood on Wednesday evening. The incident left four dead and at least three in critical condition. 

Photo Credit: Charlie Pearce | Daily Texan Staff

FORT HOOD — A soldier shot and killed four people, including himself, and injured 16 at the Fort Hood military base, located outside of Killeen, on Wednesday afternoon. The casualties mark the second mass shooting at Fort Hood in five years.

Nine patients are in treatment in the intensive care unit at the Scott & White Hospital in Temple. Three were in critical condition Wednesday night, according to Deontrea Jones, a hospital spokesman.

The soldier, who was identified by U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Austin, as 34-year-old Ivan Lopez, suffered from “unresolved” mental and behavior health issues and was in treatment, according to Lt. Gen. Mark Milley. Fort Hood officials said they would not confirm Lopez was the shooter. 

According to Fort Hood officials, the shooter fired at individuals in the 1st Medical Brigade area of Fort Hood a little after 4 p.m. He died of self-inflicted injuries after a military police officer approached him.

Milley said though the shooter had not been formally diagnosed, he was undergoing the diagnosis process for post-traumatic stress disorder. The shooter served in Iraq for four months in 2011 and had a wife and children who lived near the base.

“That’s a lengthy diagnosis,” Milley said. 

Ben Armstrong, director of UT’s Student Veteran Services, said many veterans at UT have served at Fort Hood or have other close connections with the base, although there is no way of tracking an exact number. Armstrong said he and other members of Student Veteran Services have not yet decided on a course of action or support plan.

“The immediate thing we’re worried about is the families and soldiers that are on base,” Armstrong said. “Right now I think that all we can do is hope and pray for the people that are on base, and we can go from there once we figure out what the realities of the situation are.”

In 2009, Nidal Malik Hasan, a U.S. Army major and psychiatrist, shot and killed 13 people and injured more than 30 others at Fort Hood. In 2010, former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates ordered the military to better identify potential workplace violence, improve information sharing between agencies and review emergency response capabilities at installations.

At a press conference in Chicago, President Barack Obama expressed grief and frustration that another shooting happened on a military base.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the entire community, and we’re going to do everything we can to make sure Fort Hood has what it needs,” Obama said. “Folks there sacrifice so much on behalf of our freedom. … They serve with valor and distinction. When they’re at their home base, they need to feel safe. We don’t know what happened tonight, but obviously that sense of safety has been broken again.”

Sociology sophomore Sara Tracy, who attended UT as a freshman and will be returning in the fall, lives in Killeen just a few miles away from the Fort Hood base and has family and friends who work there.

Tracy said she still has vivid memories from the 2009 shooting, which happened when she was a junior in high school.

“The first time this happened, we couldn’t leave school,” Tracy said. “It was just scary, because a lot of my friends couldn’t get ahold of their parents because the cell service is terrible when a lot of people use their phones. People were worried because they have parents who work there, and it’s just like the same thing all over again.”

Tracy said the whole community is affected by the shootings.

“It’s emotional — earlier I just cried,” Tracy said. “You just don’t expect it to happen again … you want everybody to be safe.”

Veteran John Daywalt, a government junior from Killeen whose father still works at the Fort Hood base, said another shooting at the base was not something he expected to happen.

“Hearing that it happened a second time is even more devastating,” Daywalt said. “I just hope that the families are all OK and they get the proper respect that they deserve. It just kind of hits you by surprise.”

Daywalt, who served as a paratrooper in Afghanistan, said gun regulation on army bases is more stringent than people realize.

“I think there’s definitely a misconception that everyone on base is always carrying a weapon,” Daywalt said. “You think that just because they’re in the military, they’re always carrying a weapon. In reality, you are not allowed to touch a weapon without specific orders … so it’s not like if there was something like that you would be able to just respond immediately.”

For this story, Julia Brouillette and Kate Dannenmaier contributed reporting from Temple and Fort Hood. Additional reporting by Nicole Cobler, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Jordan Rudner and Amanda Voeller from Austin.

Updated (11:07 p.m.): Nine patients are in treatment in the Intensive Care Unit at the Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple, and of those nine, three are in critical condition, according to Deontrea Jones, a hospital spokeswoman. 

The soldier, who was identified by U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Austin, as 34 year-old Ivan Lopez, suffered from “unresolved” mental and behavior health issues and was in treatment, according to Lt. Gen. Mark Milley. Fort Hood officials said they would not confrm Lopez was the shooter. He died of self-inflicted injuries after a military police officer approached him.

Milley said though the shooter had not been formally diagnosed, he was undergoing the diagnosis process for post-traumatic stress disorder. The shooter served for four months in Iraq in 2011 and had a wife and children who lived near the base.

“That’s a lengthy diagnosis,” Milley said. 

Updated (9:34 p.m.): U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, identified the shooter at Fort Hood as Ivan Lopez, a soldier at the base. McCaul is the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.

According to officials on the base, four people, including the shooter, have died. Several others are being treated for gunshot wounds at local hospitals.

Ben Armstrong, director of student veteran services, said many veterans at UT have close connections with Fort Hood, though there is no way of tracking an exact number.

“Because it’s one of the largest bases in the U.S. army, we have a large number of student veterans on campus that either served on Fort Hood or have had experiences at Fort Hood,” Armstrong said.

Armstrong said he and other members of student veteran services are monitoring the situation closely.

“The immediate thing we’re worried about is the families and soldiers that are on base,” Armstrong said. “Right now I think that all we can do is hope and pray for the people that are on base, and we can go from there, once we figure out what the realities of the situation are.”

Updated (8:22 p.m.): TEMPLE, TX — Scott and White Memorial Hospital, 30 miles from Fort Hood, is currently treating four injured people, and two additional people are en route to the hospital by way of a medical helicopter, according to chief medical official Glen Couchman.

According to Couchman, all of the injured people at the hospital are suffering from gunshot wounds ranging in severity, on victims’ chests, abdomens and extremities, and one person’s neck, Couchman said.

The hospital, which is in the process of contacting victims’ families, doesn’t expect to admit more patients in connection with the shooting, Couchman said. Other victims are being treated at local hospitals including the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center.

“This is another sad day for Central Texas,” Couchman said at a press conference Wednesday.

The Heart of Texas chapter of the Red Cross will collaborate with the city of Killeen to open a shelter for people who live on-base but cannot enter the base because of the lockdown, according to a representative of the Red Cross’ Service to the Armed Forces.

Updated (7:31 p.m.): At a press conference in Chicago, President Barack Obama expressed grief and frustration that another shooting happened on a military base.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the entire community and we’re going to do everything we can to make sure Fort Hood has what it needs,” Obama said. “Folks there sacrifice so much on behalf of our freedom...they serve with valor and distinction. When they’re at their home base, they need to feel safe. We don’t know what happened tonight, but obviously that sense of safety has been broken again.”

Sociology sophomore Sara Tracy, who attended UT as a freshman and will be returning in the fall, lives in Killeen just a few miles from the Fort Hood base and has family and friends who work there.

Tracy said she still has vivid memories from the 2009 shooting, which happened when she was a junior in high school.

“The first time this happened, we couldn’t leave school,” Tracy said. “It was just scary, because a lot of my friends couldn’t get ahold of their parents because the cell service is terrible when a lot of people use their phones. People were worried because they have parents who work there, and it’s just like the same thing all over again.”

Tracy said the whole community is affected by the shootings.

“It’s emotional — earlier I just cried,” Tracy said. “You just don’t expect it to happen again...you want everybody to be safe.”

Veteran John Daywalt, a government junior from Killeen whose father still works at the Fort Hood base, said another shooting on the base was not something he expected could happen.

“Hearing that it happened a second time is even more devastating,” Daywalt said. “I just hope that the families are all OK, and they get the proper respect that they deserve. It just kind of hits you by surprise.”

Daywalt, who served as a paratrooper in Afghanistan, said gun regulation on army bases is more stringent than people realize.

“I think there’s definitely a misconception that everyone on base is always carrying a weapon,” Daywalt said. “You think that just because they’re in the military, they’re always carrying a weapon. In reality, you are not allowed to touch a weapon without specific orders...so it’s not like if there was something like that you would be able to just respond immediately.”

Updated (6:50 p.m.): At least 18 injured people have been admitted to the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center in connection with the shooting, according to a representative from the Admissions and Dispositions department at the center. The representative said some of the 18 people have already been transferred to Scott and White Memorial Hospital in Temple, TX.

Updated (6:34 p.m.): The shooter may be dead, but this is unconfirmed, according to a report released by Fort Hood’s Directorate of Emergency Services. Fort Hood is still on lockdown.

The Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and other local hospitals are treating injured people.

In response to an independent review on the 2009 Fort Hood shooting, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates ordered the military in 2010 to better identify potential workplace violence, improve information sharing between agencies and and review emergency response capabilities at installations.

Original story (5:44 p.m.): There is at least one active shooter at the military post at Fort Hood, Texas, according to a press release issued by officers at the post.  Multiple injuries have been reported and emergency crews are on the scene.

The provost marshal’s office said the shooter is still active.

In 2009, Nidal Malik Hasan, a U.S. Army major and psychiatrist, shot and killed 13 people and injured more than 30 others at Fort Hood.

For live updates from Fort Hood, follow reporters Julia Brouillette (@juliakbrou) and Kate Dannenmaier (@kjdannen), as well as the multimedia team members Charlie Pearce (@charliepearce90), Dan Resler (@danrezler) and Carlo Nasisse (@carlonasisse).

Reporting by Julia Brouillette, Nicole Cobler, Kate Dannenmaier, Anthony Green, Jacob Kerr, Jordan Rudner and Amanda Voeller.

Photo Credit: Zachary Strain | Daily Texan Staff

For a small population of UT students, campus life comes with several realizations — being the oldest student in class or that, unlike their peers, they are balancing a family life and their studies.

Student veterans share similar backgrounds, having completed their military service and returning to civilian life. But the reintegration process has proven to be an individual experience during which veterans adapt to student life outside of strict schedules and uniforms, facing a range of stereotypes and confronting personal challenges.

“It’s an intersection of being [nontraditional] students, being older and being transfer students,” Jeff Moe, UT’s veterans affairs outreach coordinator and mental health counselor, said. “They have the same issues as other transfer students adjusting to this campus, but many also have families and are trying to balance family life with being a full-time student and, sometimes, trying to maintain a job as well.”

UT’s student veterans are typically older than the average student. Only 11 percent are between the ages of 21 and 24, while more than half are between 25 and 30 years old, according to Student Veterans Services.

For Adam Wagner, a health promotion sophomore and student veteran, interactions with other students are limited because of the few things they have in common.

“Adapting to student life is still difficult because of the disconnect,” Wagner said. “There is a decade of age between me and other students. I’m 32. I am older, and I have a family, and I’m sure they don’t want to hear about my six-year-old’s soccer game.”

The little time Wagner spends on campus outside of class is consumed by working in the Student Veteran Services office.

“I look at [school] differently, I don’t live on campus or around here, so, to me, it’s a job,” Wagner said.

Aside from the age difference, most student veterans also have previous college experience — 99 percent of UT’s student veterans are transfer students and 98 percent transfer from Austin Community College. On average, student veterans have attended more than two colleges or universities before continuing their undergraduate degrees at UT and usually arrive on campus having completed nearly half their required degree hours.

Moe said a majority of the issues student veterans face while reintegrating into their communities are not uncommon issues on a college campus.

“I see a lot of depression and anxiety, but that’s not a whole lot different from other students in general,” Moe said.

Student Veterans Services director Ben Armstrong said some student veterans struggle with lack of structure outside of the military and often take some aspect of military life with them after they leave service.

“They lived a very dogmatic, structured culture, based on heavy enforcement of rules and very parsed out services,” Armstrong said. “We joke that all of us in the military wear clothes very close to drab green, because that’s what our uniform was, and we’re comfortable in that.”

Wagner said the transition from a military routine left him with extra time on his hands, but the laid-back campus atmosphere can, at times, be frustrating.

“You don’t really know what to do,” Wagner said. “You’re so used to having a task that needs to be done by 6 a.m. Now you’re here and there is a lot of sitting around, which is unheard of there.”

Reintegration comes with additional challenges for disabled student veterans whose transition to college life includes physical recovery.

“I’m disabled so I pretty much do what I can then go home and take pain pills,” anthropology junior John Marchi said. “When my school day is over, I’m done. I’m wiped out.”

The reintegration process is different for some female veterans who make up less than one-fifth of UT’s student veteran population, though women make up almost one-third of student veterans nationally.

Nursing sophomore Gabrielle Evans said her reintegration experience was molded by the residual effects of gender discrimination and sexual harassment she faced while in the military.

“I went through a lot of sexual harassment in the military, so I have a really hard time dealing with what happened when I was in the military,” Evans said. “Most of the men will have an easier time adjusting than any woman … because I have a hypersensitivity [to] it, I expect that out of guys and the student population in general.”

Student veterans often encounter a variety of stereotypes, ranging from their political beliefs to mental health.

“You hear ‘sir’ a lot, and it’s out of respect,” Wagner said. “But a lot of times sitting around in classes, I’m starting to get the impression that they think we’re all either crazy, pissed off, disabled and we’re here on benefits.”

Wagner said veterans are often portrayed as broken people who struggle in civilian life.

“I’m a veteran, I’m a strong individual, don’t portray me as weak and being taken advantage of,” Wagner said. “We’re supposed to be labeled as strong individuals to begin with, that’s why we represent the nation in the armed forces. It creates a bad public opinion of a veteran.”

There are some factors to help ease with reintegration. Texas is one of 20 states that provide in-state tuition eligibility to veterans, their spouses and their dependents, regardless of previous residency, making their education more affordable. UT also created the Student Veterans Services office in 2011 to assist students with transitional paper work, combat stress and social isolation, which veterans commonly deal with.

But UT’s student veteran population of about 600 students only makes up a little more than 1 percent of the student population while veterans make up 4 percent of undergraduates and graduates nationwide, according to the U.S. Department of Education. 

Armstrong said the Student Veterans Services office serves as a “safe place” on campus where student veterans can meet “like-minded” individuals, creating a space on campus similar to those for other minority groups.

“We all have similar experience of some sort — if nothing else, every vet had the experience of basic [training], so it’s something to talk about,” Marchi said.

Some veterans say their military experience helps them find areas of interest on campus. For Marchi, learning about foreign cultures in the military lead to his anthropology degree.

“I’m kind of a people watcher,” Marchi said. “Part of that is probably due to the military, you’re kind of taught to pay attention to things, but I’ve taken it somewhere else. I notice little things that other people don’t. When I watch people it’s amusing.”

Though his hostile days of military action are behind him, Marchi said his military service has since changed his perspective, including his view of campus life.

“I get bored really easily now,” Marchi said. “Everything kind of moves slower. If you could imagine colors being washed out and life being that way: [It’s] kind of like that now. I’m constantly looking for something to liven it up.”

Mathematics sophomore Daniel Penuelaz is one of 809 veterans on campus that could be affected by the government shutdown. As a husband and father of two children in San Antonio, Penuelaz relies heavily on his benefits for his education and to travel back home to his family every other weekend.

Photo Credit: Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff

UT student veterans, who would normally receive $1 million in federal money Nov. 1 for veterans’ disability and educational benefits, may not receive the payment because of the government shutdown.

Across campus, the shutdown has closed the LBJ Library and threatens research grants. Now, student veterans may see an impact as the office awaits the sum of money that usually arrives at the beginning of every month.

The government shutdown — now in its third week — could suspend claim processing for different veterans benefits, as well as surviving spouses and dependents. This includes halting compensation payments for more than 5.1 million veterans, Eric Shinseki, secretary of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, said before the House Committee on Veteran Affairs Wednesday.

Each of the 600 students using these benefits on campus receive between $200 and $2,000 a month, said Ben Armstrong, director of Student Veteran Services.

“Although we are not required to do anything as an institution, we realize that this money is very important to our students,” Armstrong said. “Some of them may not be able to pay their bills or even get to class. We are working to find what abilities we have in order to help these students.”

Student Veteran Services has been in contact with the Office of Financial Aid, Office of the Registrar and the Office of Accounting to see what steps would be taken if these students did not receive their money.

Jamie Brown, communications coordinator at the Office of Student Financial Services, said there is no set plan, but there will be a meeting later this week to discuss available options.

“Generally, we’re going to work with these students on an individual basis and help them as we would any student in an emergency situation,” Brown said.

Armstrong said 55 percent of these student veterans are 25 to 30 years old, and 18 percent are 31 to 35 years old, many of whom have families that rely on them.

Mathematics sophomore Daniel Penuelaz returned from duty almost four years ago and decided to go back to school because of the post-9/11 GI Bill that would pay for most of his education and housing.

As a husband and father of two children in San Antonio, Penuelaz said he relies heavily on his benefits to afford an education at his “dream school” and to travel back home to his family every other weekend.

“The benefit I get usually covers the housing I receive,” Penuelaz said. “I use that money to pay for all the bills of the house. If I don’t get that check, my family is in trouble because we use my housing allowance to pay for a majority of the bills.”

Out of the 2,000 people receiving benefits on campus, only 809 are veterans. The rest are surviving children, wives or husbands of wartime veterans.

Jeremiah Gunderson, coordinator of Student Veteran Services, said the impact is noticeable in his office. Even Gunderson will be affected directly by the shutdown because he receives veteran disability benefits every month.

About 3.8 million wounded U.S. veterans could potentially not receive disability checks, which they get based on mental and physical wounds from combat.

“Their future is kind of in the hands of a bunch of people who seem a million miles away, and they don’t have any say in it,” Gunderson said. “We’ll just have to wait and see.”

Clarification: Federal money is distributed directly to student veterans and not UT Student Veterans Services.

Correction: There are 600 student veterans on campus.

Tuesday marked the 10th anniversary of the initial invasion of Iraq and the start of the Iraq War. 

Student veteran coordinator Ben Armstrong said while the day offers an opportunity for remembrance and recognition for US citizens, veterans’ experiences remain personal. 

“It’s not as easy as saying this is a day where we can sit around and talk about it,” Armstrong said. “We’re still too close to this war to romanticize it or simplify it. It’s messy. It’s war.”

Armstrong is the coordinator of the Student Veteran Services Center, which opened in November 2011 to assist with the transition for veterans from active duty into student life. Armstrong served as a corporal in the Marine Corps for five years. He said the center gives veterans support when returning to civilian life. 

“Seven hundred some people scattered across this campus had to go out into a different culture — put there by people who make decisions — and did the best they could to adapt and overcome in their specific situation,” Armstrong said.

Philosophy senior Gary Romriell, a student veteran who was medically discharged, said prior to his deployment in 2004 as an infantry soldier, he did not fully understand the combat experience.

“I was going to become special forces and all that,” Romriell said. “Then I went to Iraq and I decided ‘No, I’m going to college.’”

Romriell said the media tends to emphasize anniversary days as an opportunity for political promotion or monetary gain.

“We remember the experiences and maintain our own pride internally,” Romriell said. “I learned to appreciate that no matter what our political perspective, every war is both horrible and a possible force for change — for good.”

Armstrong said that each soldier has their own ghosts, skeletons and memories.

“With or without this day set aside for acknowledgement, the different experiences of the veterans will always be with them,” Armstrong said.

Biology senior Amy Prichard, a Student Veteran Services Center management team member, said Army medicine made history by leaving a fully functional hospital with the government of Iraq during her service as a captain in the Medical Service Corps

“It obviously makes me sad to point out the futility in all of it, but my individual opinion doesn’t matter,” Prichard said. “Geopolitically what was happening was what was happening. Regardless of whether or not I agree or disagree I feel good about what I did, and I feel good about what my hospital did, and the people we took care of. That’s what I have to keep.”

 

Student Veteran Services tabled in the six pack Nov. 12, 2012, as part of Veterans Appreciation Week. The week’s festivities also included a benefit fair Nov. 15 and veteran opportunity discussions Nov. 16.

Photo Credit: Raveena Bhalara | Daily Texan Staff

UT’s Student Veteran Services paid tribute to veterans enrolled in the University with a display of American flags arranged in the shape of the Longhorn logo to kick off Veterans Appreciation Week on Monday.

The annual flag display prepared by Student Veteran Services included a flag for each veteran enrolled at UT. This year’s Veterans Appreciation Week events include a twitter photo competition Monday, a benefit fair Thursday in the Student Services Building and veteran opportunity awareness discussions open to the public Friday at the University Teaching Center.

Student veteran coordinator Ben Armstrong said Veterans Appreciation Week is usually the one time every year veterans get the attention they deserve. Student Veteran Services encouraged students to take a pair of dog tags they distributed Monday and tweet a creative photograph that reminded them of veterans in Austin. Students were able to submit photos with the hash tag “#SVSphoto” for a chance to win a $25 iTunes gift card. Armstrong said students at UT and residents of Travis County have always been supportive of military events and the attention Student Veteran Services received from students at Monday’s promotion made him proud.

“Student Veteran Services is a one-stop shop for student veterans who don’t know about all the benefits they could be taking advantage of,” Armstrong said. “When we get attention from regular students, it helps all the veterans who aren’t already part of Student Veteran Services activities get involved in the community.”

Jeff Abadie, a veteran and UT alumnus, said student participation in Veteran Appreciation Week is important to him because any attention at all to student veterans is more than usual. Abadie said this week bridges the veterans in Student Veteran Services to others on campus who want to increase involvement with raising awareness.

“The main benefit of Student Veteran Services for me was the social aspect,” Abadie said. “It’s nice to have a group of friends who went through the same stuff I did after being in the military.”

Abadie said he thinks more people are getting involved in veteran support on campus and are interested in spreading the word. Students in Student Veteran Services participate in social events, including tailgating before football games and monthly meetings.

Veterans Appreciation Week helps student veterans gain access to education funding benefits, community outreach and health care benefits provided by the Veterans Administration health care system. Speech/language pathology sophomore Meagan Orsak said the flag display Monday was perfectly timed, because everyone still had Veterans Day on their mind.

“I didn’t realize how many students were in the military,” Orsak said. “Other students have fraternities or sororities and clubs that get all kinds of attention, so it’s cool to see the group veterans have created for themselves on campus.”

Printed on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 as: Veteran benefits rise to spotlight

Jasmine-Rose Henderson greets students arriving at the Student Veterans Services office Tuesday morning for an information session about obtaining class credit for military service. The event is part of UT’s first Veteran Week, which seeks to guide the approximately 640 student veterans adjust to civilian life.

Photo Credit: Zen Ren | Daily Texan Staff

After ending his military service in 2009, sociology senior Donald Davis returned to the classroom for the first time in over a decade, but had trouble assimilating to civilian life at the University after receiving little proper guidance from University resources because of his status as a non-traditional student.

This week, the Student Veteran Center is hosting the first Veteran Welcome Week to help the approximately 640 student veterans on campus who may be in similar situations.

Ben Armstrong, former aviation electrician for the Marine Corps and current coordinator for the center, said the mission of the week and of the center itself is to connect, integrate and develop student veterans, especially individuals who leave the military and come to the University and are not sure how to fully access the resources available to them.

“We try to act as that pipeline to help them better understand the conversion,” Armstrong said.

Armstrong said the events are being held to clear up certain questions and concerns student veterans have had in the past.

Davis, a former Army medic, said he had to discover what military benefits he had as a student alone because he didn’t get the help he needed from the University. He said he struggled to decipher the process disabled veterans go through to attend the University and acquire benefits through the GI Bill.

“I didn’t have peer-to-peer connection or any student advocacy that helped me go through that,” Davis said. “It took me a few semesters to get acclimated to the experience and it was extra pressure to keep up because I hadn’t been in an actual classroom in over 10 years.”

The UT Student Veteran’s Association collaborated with Veteran Welcome Week by hosting a lecture Monday by the organization’s president.

Steven Denman, history senior and former Army combat medic, transferred to the University in 2010 and is now the events coordinator for SVA. Denman said the purpose of the organization is to maintain the unity that student veterans had while in the military.

“Most veterans miss that sense of brotherhood and belonging that the military provided, so we try to replicate that at SVA,” Denman said. “A lot of what we try to do is help military students get out of their personal bubble by helping them meet new people and get involved because it’s such a large institution that it’s easy to get lost in the system.”

Denman said the Veteran Center provides useful resources that have helped him work out his plans to go to law school and it could help others looking for guidance.

Printed on Wednesday, February 22, 2012 as: Program helps student veterans adjust