Baylor

Senior linebacker Steve Edmond led the Longhorn defense against Baylor on Saturday with a career-high 17 tackles and two sacks against the Bears.

Photo Credit: Jenna VonHofe | Daily Texan Staff

Although Texas’ 2-3 record doesn’t quite reflect it, the Longhorn defense stands strong this season. The Baylor offense entered Saturday’s game ranked highly, averaging 56.8 points, 641 total yards and 401.3 passing yards per game. Unfazed, the Texas defensive line cut each of those numbers by at least 40 percent: down to 28 points, 389 yards of total offense and just 111 passing yards. Numerous players contributed to the Longhorns’ defensive efforts, but senior linebacker Steve Edmond stood out above them all.

“With 17 tackles and a sack, [Edmond] is getting better and better,” head coach Charlie Strong said. “You’d like for him to be a little more vocal because the way he plays the game, players all respect him. But the game he had on Saturday, he was very good.”

As Strong said, Edmond’s leadership style is far from vocal. He prefers his actions to speak louder than his words, and his production accomplishes just that. Edmond’s seven tackles for loss ranks second on the team after junior defensive tackle Malcom Brown. In addition, with a career-high 17 tackles and two sacks against Baylor this weekend, Edmond trails senior linebacker Jordan Hicks’ 69 total tackles by just four.

“[Edmond] and Hicks are real consistent players on the defense,” Strong said.

This consistency doesn’t come without hours of preparation. And it’s this preparation combined with Edmond’s stats that has gained his teammates’ respect. Hicks said Edmond spends hours in the film room with Strong and linebackers coach Brian Jean-Mary. While analyzing footage with coaches, Edmond isn’t afraid to ask questions to better understand schemes. Hicks said Edmond works toward one goal: understanding the game well enough that he’s always on the same page as the rest of the team. Through five games in 2014, Edmond certainly has been.

“It’s his preparation,” Hicks said. “He’s going into the game prepared, taking it very seriously this year. That’s been key for him — going out able to play fast and play confident. He’s doing a great job for us.”

Without redshirt senior center Dominic Espinosa and former quarterback David Ash to lead the offense this season, the Longhorns have needed players like Edmond to have great performances. Redshirt senior receiver John Harris said the offense knows it’s not pulling its weight, but it also appreciates the defensive compensation. Harris said he finds it comforting to know that if the offense can pull it together, it won’t have to worry about the defense resulting in losses.

“You can get numb to [losing], and I’m not saying you want to get used to losing, but we want to change it,” Harris said. “If we can just get on a roll and score some points — our defense is playing great, and we can get these younger guys moving forward and learning how to play football games.”

Harris and fellow offensive players know that if they eliminate the small errors, they’ll be able to get on a roll. All it takes is some extra practice, time in the film room and asking the necessary questions to get on the same page as the team. The strategy works, and Edmond can vouch for it. And if he’s not vocal enough to vouch for it on his own, his 17 tackles against Baylor will speak
for themselves.

74-44-2: Texas’ all-time record in its fifth games of the season, a win percentage of 62 percent.

17-6-1: Texas’ record when entering a game 2-2, a win percentage of 71 percent.

74-25-4: The all-time record, in Texas’ favor, between the Longhorns and Bears, a win percentage of 73 percent. While the Bears have never won more than two in a row against Texas, the Longhorns won 16 games in a row against Baylor from 1958-73.

10: The number of times Baylor scored at least 30 points against the Longhorns in the previous 103 meetings between the two teams. The Bears broke 30 in each of the last four meetings and won three of those meetings.

5: The number of senior classes — 2013, 1992, 1991, 1989, and 1939 — at Texas that lost to Baylor in three out of four seasons. This year’s class sits at 1-2 against the Bears.

25-13: The average score, in the Longhorns’ favor, between Baylor and Texas all time.

12.7: The average scoring differential of 12.7, in Baylor’s favor, against the Longhorns’ 2014 senior class would be the worst mark ever, if it holds. The 2013 seniors finished their careers being outscored by Baylor by an average of 11.5 points.

9-7: The Longhorns’ record when they face a Baylor team ranked in the AP poll. Texas is 4-4 against the Bears when Baylor is ranked in the AP poll and Texas is not. Unranked Texas teams are 3-1 against Baylor when it is ranked in the AP Top 10, however.

56.8: This season, Baylor is averaging 56.8 points per game, the best mark in the country. The Longhorns are only averaging 21.3 points per game, good for ninth in the Big 12.

9: Texas has picked off nine passes, second-most in the nation, so far this year. Of those nine interceptions, eight of them came in victories.

1: The Bears have made just one field goal on six attempts this season, a conversion percentage of less than 17 percent.

12.8: Against the Bears, opponents only average 12.8 first downs per game, best in the conference and fifth-best in the nation. Texas only averages 16.5 first downs per contest, ranking dead last in the conference.

0: The number of sacks allowed by the Bears’ offensive line on the season. The only other NCAA team that has yet to allow a sack is New Mexico State. The Longhorns have 17 sacks on the season and have yet to record fewer than three in a game.

9: The number of passes by Baylor that have gone for 40-plus yards this season, tied for second in the country. The Longhorns have yet to allow a pass of over 35 yards.

No. 10 LSU vs. No. 1 Alabama

This game is arguably one of the biggest and best rivalries in college football. Since 2000, the Tigers have won five of the last six road games against Alabama and hold more wins over the Crimson Tide than any other team in the nation. But Alabama isn’t currently the No. 1 team in the nation for nothing. With quarterback A.J. McCarron leading the Crimson Tide offense they are averaging 41.2 points and 462.8 yards per game with seven turnovers. LSU’s offense, on the other hand, led by quarterback Zach Mettenberger, has had a similar performance, averaging 40.2 points and 480 yards per game; however, they’ve had 14 turnovers. In this game, the Tigers will have to protect the ball. They’re going to need every offensive minute they can get against Alabama’s solid defense. 

 

Arizona vs. No. 16 UCLA

This matchup of 6-2 Pac-12 teams may be a little misleading. Though their records are equal, UCLA has had a much tougher schedule than Arizona with their only losses coming from elite teams, Stanford and Oregon. Despite these though matchups, the Bruins have still averaged 37.2 points and 462 yards per game. UCLA managed to rebound from those losses and get back to their strong season by winning against Colorado last week. The Wildcats may have had it pretty easy thus far, but they have won three in a row and their offense is averaging a respectable 35.9 points and 463.1 yards per game while committing just eight turnovers this year. UCLA is looking for a spot in the Pac-12 title game, but Arizona has a lot they want to prove.

 

No. 6 Baylor vs. No. 10 Oklahoma

This game was anticipated to be an important Big 12 showdown but turned into more of a Oklahoma shutdown. After a slow start by Baylor, who scored only three points in the first quarter, the Bears woke up and got back to their usual high-powered offensive ways. The Bears went on to score 21 unanswered points in the second quarter, making the score 24-5 going into halftime. The Sooners struggled to keep up in the second half. Oklahoma quarterback Blake Bell managed to pull himself together to throw for one touchdown reception in the third quarter, but the Sooners couldn’t come back from the momentum Baylor continued to gain until the clock hit zero. Baylor improved their record to 8-0 an possibly at Top 3 ranking with Oregon losing.

 

No. 3 Oregon vs. No. 5 Stanford

Oregon looked like it was about to get shut out since 2007. Stanford forced the Ducks to slow down — something they aren’t used to doing — by using their run game to take time off the clock. The Cardinal’s defensive line got pressure on Heisman candidate Marcus Mariota early and kept the pressure on, disrupting his timing. Stanford outrushed Oregon 141-22 en route to a 17-0 halftime lead, winning in the trenches. The Cardinal held the Ducks scoreless until 10 minutes were left in the fourth quarter. But that touchdown put life back into Oregon’s offense. The Ducks rallied to score two more touchdowns, but after Stanford recovered the final onside kick, Oregon’s fate was sealed in a 26-20 loss to the Cardinal.

1. Baylor (6-0, 3-0 Big 12)

After “struggling” against Kansas State, the Bears’ high-powered offense got back on track with a 71-point performance against lowly Iowa State. Baylor checked in at No. 8 in the initial BCS rankings and has a chance to enter the national championship conversation if they win out and get some help along the way.

 

2. Texas Tech (7-0, 4-0)

The Red Raiders trailed heading into the fourth quarter for the first time all season in Morgantown, but an impressive comeback led by freshman quarterback Davis Webb kept Tech’s perfect record intact. Webb was stellar in just his second career start, throwing for over 400 yards, two scores and no interceptions. He’ll be put to the test yet again this weekend in Norman.

 

3. Texas (4-2, 3-0)

A couple weeks after winning their first Golden Hat since 2009, the Longhorns head back to the Metroplex for a matchup with the Horned Frogs. The talent has been there all season, but Texas appears to be finding its identity now. Johnathan Gray and Malcolm Brown are making the Longhorns’ backfield as good as any in the country and the veteran offensive line is beginning to live up to expectations.

 

4. Oklahoma (6-1, 3-1)

The Sooners bounced back from their devastating Red River Rivalry loss with an easy win over Kansas, but the passing game continues to struggle. Their biggest play of the day came on a wide receiver pass while quarterback Blake Bell threw for only 131 yards. They’ll need more from him against Baylor and Texas Tech the next two weeks.

 

5. Oklahoma State (5-1, 2-1)

As bad as the quarterback play has been in Norman, it’s been worse in Stillwater. The Cowboys beat TCU, but quarterbacks Clint Chelf and J.W. Walsh combined for no touchdowns and three interceptions in the game. They’ll need to be a whole lot better if they hope to get a win in Lubbock in a couple weeks.

 

6. West Virginia (3-4, 1-3)

The Mountaineers showed some promise in their loss against Texas Tech, leading most of the game. With all four teams below them on this list still on their schedule, there is still time for West Virginia to turn their season around and get into a bowl game.

 

7. TCU (3-4, 1-3)

The Horned Frogs continue to be the biggest disappointment in the Big 12, if not in the whole country. Casey Pachall’s return can’t come quick enough, as Trevone Boykin continues to struggle as the starting quarterback. If they don’t beat Texas this week, their chances to earn a bowl berth will be very slim.

 

8. Kansas State (2-4, 0-3)

The Wildcats’ conference record is a little misleading as their three Big 12 losses have come to Baylor, Texas and Oklahoma State by an average of just eight points per game. With that being said, a loss is a loss and if Bill Snyder’s bunch can’t beat West Virginia this weekend, their postseason dreams are all but crushed.

 

9. Kansas (2-4, 0-3)

Despite passing for just 16 yards, the Jayhawks held their own against Oklahoma last weekend, leading midway through the second quarter and pulling to within six points of the lead early in the fourth. Unfortunately for head coach Charlie Weis, Baylor comes to town this week. Can they hold the Bears under 70 points?

 

10. Iowa State (1-5, 0-3)

Through their first five games, the Cyclones hadn’t lost a game by more than eight points. That changed in Waco, where Baylor scored more than 10 times as many points as Iowa State. No, that is not a misprint. Giving up 71 to the Bears was hardly a surprise, but the Cyclones offense was even worse, tallying just 174 total yards while turning the ball over three times.

Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein is surrounded on the field by Baylor fans after the Wildcats’ 52-24 loss in Waco. Klein, the Heisman Trophy favorite entering the weekend, threw three interceptions on 54 percent passing. 

Photo Credit: The Associated Press

WACO — The night began with a prayer, which is really all Baylor had anyway. The No. 1 Wildcats were in town, 12-point favorites with the Heisman Trophy favorite in tow, and the Bears had only four wins to their name.

Pastor Jeff Warren led the pregame invocation, a custom common among private schools, thanking “father God” for “Jesus and the cross.”

And then all hell broke loose.

Baylor scored, and scored, and scored, and scored and scored some more. Quarterback Nick Florence passed for 238 yards and two touchdowns. Running back Lache Seastrunk housed an 80-yard run on a 185-yard night. Wideout Terrance Williams caught five balls for 87 yards and a score. Holy Trinity, you betcha. The Wildcats couldn’t stop it, nor could they keep up offensively. Baylor’s defense, among the worst in the FBS, had an out-of-body experience, battering Collin Klein, who looked woozy and wobbly and threw three interceptions. Thrice Klein was stuffed on the goal line, so it’s a minor miracle the sun came up Sunday. Surreally, the Bears took a quick lead and never looked back; one what-just-happened moment after another. The final score, 52-24, sent the student section onto the field, serenaded by the Black Eyed Peas’ “I Gotta Feeling.”

In 2004, when Baylor beat Texas A&M, the students ripped up a goal post and marched it right back to campus. That was big; this was tremendous ­­— the school’s first ever win over the BCS’ No. 1 team. Baylor has been slowly building toward such an upset, such a stage, since 2008, when Art Briles took over as head coach. Five Baylor players have gone in the first round of the NFL Draft the last four years, including Robert Griffin III, last season’s Heisman darling. Life without RG3 has been difficult this fall, however, and Baylor, ranked at the beginning of the season, tumbled out of the national spotlight after each loss. The team still needs one win to achieve bowl eligibility.

On FOX’s postgame radio show, Seastrunk, without prompt, announced his Heisman campaign.

“I’m gonna get it,” the sophomore said.

So, yeah, it was that kind of night. Both the Wildcats and No. 2 Oregon fell, which means Notre Dame is a win away from the BCS Championship game. They will be joined by an SEC team to be named later — likely Alabama, unfortunately. Klein’s poor showing means Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel could wind up with the Heisman. If Texas beats TCU and Kansas State, and if Oklahoma falls to Oklahoma State, the Longhorns automatically get the Big 12’s BCS bowl bid, and share of the conference title, by virtue of a four-way tie and head-to-head advantage. Who could have seen that happening after the disaster in Dallas?

Waco, where the college football world was abruptly flipped on its head; it is also where we were all reminded of the thing we love — and sometimes forget — about the sport: anything can happen.

Yes, anything. 

Printed on Monday, November 19, 2012 as: Baylor beatdown: Bears knock No. 1 Wildcats out of title game, Horns suddenly have shot to win Big 12 title

It was not a pretty win for the Longhorns. But thanks to the well-rounded offense, Texas defeated Baylor for the first time in three years.

With 10 different players catching passes and the 251 rushing yards the Longhorns accumulated, the offense made it very difficult for the Baylor defense to keep track of players and keep up.

“This is the offense we want,” head coach Mack Brown said. It’s who we want to be — very balanced. It’s who we were the first
two games.”

David Ash picked apart the struggling Baylor defense and went 19-for-31 for 274 yards while Joe Bergeron had five rushing touchdowns.

First quarter — It was clear it was going to be a shootout very early on. Daje Johnson ran for an 84-yard touchdown on the first play of the game.  A botched snap by Kyle Ashby on fourth down gave Baylor the ball on the Texas 8-yard line and Nick Florence ran the ball in for an easy touchdown. Bergeron had his first touchdown of the game to give Texas back the lead.  Baylor scored on 2-yard rush from Glasco Martin and then went up 21-14 when Terrance Williams scored on an 80-yard pass from Florence. 

Second quarter — Bergeron scored three touchdowns in the quarter. Baylor’s Lanear Sampson had a seven-yard touchdown reception and freshman Johnathan Gray finally scored his first touchdown as a Longhorn. The Bears hit a field goal at the end of the half to make the score 42-31, in favor of Texas.

Third quarter — The second half was much quieter than the first.  The Texas defense forced a fumble, but Baylor tight end Jordan Najvar fell on the ball in the end zone for a touchdown. Bergeron finished his high-scoring night with his fifth touchdown and the score was 49-43 heading into the fourth quarter.

Fourth quarter — Mike Davis scored on a 15-yard pass from Ash. Florence kept things interesting by scoring a touchdown with 1:57 left in the game.
255 — Number of rushing yards given up to the Bears, a team known for its passing game.

BY THE NUMBERS
100 — Baylor’s scoring percentage in the red zone as they went

7-for-7.
 
7 ­— the number of rushing touchdowns Texas scored, five of them came from Bergeron.

607 — Number of total offensive yards the Bears accumulated. This is the second consecutive week the Longhorns have given up more than 600-yards.

STOCK UP, STOCK DOWN
Stock up — David Ash.  He is continuing to improve and managed to spread the ball around. He went 19-for-31 for 274 yards and threw the ball downfield 67-yards to Davis. His left wrist injury did not seem to affect him at all and he took advantage of Baylor’s struggling defense. 

Stock down — Rush defense. It seems repetitive to declare the rush defense as the weakest aspect of the Longhorns. But giving up 255 rushing yards to pass happy Baylor shows how much the defense is struggling. Tackling is still a problem, but is improving.

WHAT’S NEXT
The Longhorns will have easier competition Saturday. They will be facing Kansas, the only team with a worse Big 12 record than Baylor. Though the game is in Lawrence, Kan., the Longhorns should not have a problem handling Charlie Weis’ struggling squad. Kansas is 1-6 on the season and 0-4 in Big 12 play. Kansas’ last game ended in a loss to Oklahoma State, 52-7.

Printed on Monday, October 22, 2012 as: Texas does what it takes to win

Stat Guy: Baseball starts slow, picks up

At the beginning of the season, Texas was off to a poor start. It featured a five game losing streak which included a sweep at the hands of the Cardinal in which their lowest single game run output was higher than Texas’ three game total. It wasn’t the most desirable start for a team that was coming off its record 34th College World Series appearance.

The Longhorns began to right the ship in mid March. Texas swept Oklahoma as part of a six game win streak. Since losing eight of its first 13 games, Texas has only lost one series which was a nonconference one against California. Texas even managed to take two out of three against Kansas State, which is quite an accomplishment for any Texas team.

During the first two months of the season, Texas was giving up 4 runs a game(actually, it was 4.7, so that could be rounded up to five for the pessimists out there), but the defense has cut that down to an even three so far in the month of April. Texas has an ERA of 3.35 this season, which is the highest it has been since 2008, when it was 4.48.

Texas has led the conference in team ERA six times since 2003, and has an ERA under 3.00 five times. Unlike the past three seasons, where Texas led the conference in fielding percentage, it is currently next to last in fielding percentage, only ahead of Missouri. Additionally, Texas is tied for fifth in errors in the Big 12 with 42.

All that being said, one of the biggest statistical drop-offs this season from past seasons comes in complete games. Texas has had at least six complete games in each of the past three seasons, but it still has a goose egg in that category so far this season.

As is typical with Augie Gurrido teams, the Texas bats have not exactly been popping this season. The Longhorns are seventh in the Big 12 in batting average, and sixth in on base percentage. But this wouldn’t be a true Texas baseball team unless it was near the bottom in home runs. Good news there: Texas is ninth in the conference in home runs with 12, less than half of league-leading Baylor’s 25. The only thing keeping Texas from being tenth in the conference is the fact that Iowa State doesn’t field a baseball team.

Texas is about to face one of the few teams in the conference that is worse on offense than it is. Kansas is last in the Big 12 in offense with a team batting average of only .250. The Jayhawks have four more home runs than the Longhorns do, but have 18 less runs, which is also good for dead last in the conference.

Sophomore Eric Weiss is the only Texas player to appear in the top ten in more than one offense category. He is tied for tenth in home runs, ninth in runs scored, and is a whopping eighth in the Big 12 in slugging percentage. One thing you can write in stone without any hesitation is that Texas is not going to be making any kind of run into the CWS based on its offensive prowess.

Halfway through conference play, Texas has positioned itself alongside Texas A&M right behind league leader Baylor. The Longhorns have series’ left against Kansas and Missouri, two of the bottom three teams in the league, but it also has to play two of the top three teams in the conference. But, four of its six games against Texas A&M and Baylor will be in Austin, giving Texas a potential edge in games that could decide the conference champion.

Sophomore Hannah Allison was almost born to play a division one sport, as her mother and her sister have both played sports in college. Allison’s Mom played basketball at Baylor, and her sister is a middle blocker at Oklahoma Baptist university.

Photo Credit: Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff

Some might say sophomore setter Hannah Allison and senior outside hitter Amber Roberson have a genetic advantage on the court.

Both girls were born into athletic families.

Allison’s mom Kelly played basketball at Baylor and her sister, Sarah, is a senior middle blocker at Oklahoma Baptist University. And her dad played high school basketball, baseball and football.

Allison followed in her mother’s footsteps and played basketball all throughout high school until her senior year, when she graduated early and came to Texas in the spring. But her mom was not upset when she chose volleyball. Although she grew up playing basketball and still loves it, volleyball won her over.

“I loved both sports but I think I was just better at volleyball than I was basketball,” Allison said. “I knew volleyball would take me farther than basketball and the more I played it, the more I fell in love with it.”

She said growing up in such a competitive household shaped her personality and gave her a competitive spirit.

“My sister and I weren’t ever allowed to keep score in any games we played so that we didn’t fight,” Allison said. “It was definitely competitive all the time.”

Everything was a competition between the two siblings. Allison and her sister would race down the stairs or attempt to walk to the store faster than the other. In high school, the sisters played on the same team during Sarah’s senior year and Hannah’s freshman year.

“Luckily we’ve been on the same team, because it would be a lot more competitive, obviously, if we had been on separate teams,” Allison said.

She believes that the competition between the two of them helped make them both better volleyball players.

“I think competition transfers to your work ethic and how good you want to be and how high you set your goals,” Allison said. “Watching my sister grow up and be in front of me and how hard she worked, I learned from her work ethic. My mom is the hardest working person I know and even though I didn’t watch her play sports, it’s just the way that she is. It’s the way both of my parents are.”

Roberson, who has four sisters and two brothers, also has a very athletic family.

Her father played basketball at New Mexico State and professionally overseas. Her mom played volleyball at New Mexico State. Her sister Ashlee played for the Texas Tech women’s basketball team and her brother plays basketball at Colorado.

Although Roberson played basketball in high school and earned all-district, all-city, all-region and all-state honors her senior season at Wagner High in San Antonio, she decided to go with her mom’s roots and play volleyball in college.

“Volleyball fit my personality a lot better,” Roberson said. “I feel like volleyball is more me, especially with all the cheering and how exciting it is.”

She said that when she was younger, her and her older sister were passed around in the stands while her mom played volleyball.

“I guess we had a feel for it naturally,” Roberson said.

Her father was also very happy when she decided to come to Texas and play volleyball.

“My dad supports my decision no matter what I go with,” Roberson said. “He would have loved it if I played basketball as well, but volleyball was a good choice.”

Like Allison, Roberson and her siblings have some healthy competition in their house.

“We aren’t as competitive as we were when we were little, but we definitely are competitive,” Roberson said.

Allison, Roberson and the Longhorns are hoping to improve their 2-1 Big 12 conference record tonight as they face Texas A&M at Gregory Gym. 

Printed on Wednesday, October 5, 2011 as: ''Skills are in the genes for Allison, Roberson''

Soccer

Texas finished their weekend in Austin strong on Sunday night as junior midfielder Kylie Doniak led the Longhorns to their first Big 12 win of the year in a 1-0 victory over Baylor.

Doniak scored the only goal of the match in the 12th minute off of a free kick from the far right side of the field near the sideline. Her shot took a bounce and found the back of the net. This was Doniak’s third goal of the year and second game winner.

In the 13th minute, Doniak was given the opportunity to give the Longhorns a 2-0 lead with a penalty kick. But Baylor goalie Courtney Seelhorst saved it.

The first 30 minutes of the game were dominated by Texas with shots by Kylie Doniak, Lexi Harris and Hannah Higgins. Sophomore Kristen Cummins, Texas’ leading goal scorer, had a header shot that went wide in the 25th minute.

In the last 10 minutes, Baylor had three shots. In the 84th minute, Baylor’s Lisa Sliwinski attempted to tie the game with a header, but Alexa Gaul made a great save.

Texas outshot Baylor 10-8 and goalie Alexa Gaul had five saves in her sixth shutout of the year.

Baylor played recklessly and received 23 fouls throughout the game and four yellow cards issued to Georgia Mullins, Kat Ludlow, Karlee Summey and Vic Hoffman.

Texas is now 8-3-3 overall and 1-2-2 in league, despite tying with Texas Tech 0-0 on Friday at home. The game went into two 10-minute overtime periods, but neither team could end the game with a golden goal. The Longhorns dominated most of the game but were unable to get anything past Red Raider goal keeper Erin Wikelius.

“We actually played pretty well, but there’s two parts to it,” said Texas head coach Chris Petrucelli. “You’ve got to play well and score well, and we didn’t score well.”

The Longhorns started off the game on the attack, putting the Red Raiders on their heels early. Texas kept pushing the ball into Texas Tech territory, which created chances from corner kicks. The Longhorns took six corner kicks in the first half and had 12 for the game.

When Texas wasn’t getting chances off corners, forward Leah Fortune created the offense for the Longhorns. In the 23rd minute, she dribbled through three Red Raider defenders and dropped it off to a wide open Higgins, who let a shot go from the 18-yard box. The ball was headed for the far corner, but Wikelius made a diving save to keep the ball out of the net.

Fortune continued to generate offense for Texas in the second half. Fortune drew a foul 7 yards outside the box in the 57th minute, which set up a free kick for midfielder Kylie Doniak. Doniak sent the kick through a four-man wall but didn’t get enough on the ball, and Wikelius was able to stop the foray without too much trouble.

Although Texas was able to put up 15 shots on Wikelius, she was able to avoid trouble because most of those were sent wide of the goal. Of the 15, only four made it on net.
“I think a lot of time, we’re looking for that perfect goal,” Doniak said. “We were a little bit unlucky today.”

As much as the Texas offense struggled, the defense excelled. Senior Erica Campanelli was charged with defending star Baylor midfielder Taylor Lytle for the game, who was an all-Big 12 selection last season and has three game-winning goals this season.

“We gave up very few scoring chances,” Petrucelli said. “I felt we had them bottled up where they weren’t creating much. Erica [Campanelli] was certainly a part of that.”

Campanelli was strong all match but made the play of the game with seven minutes remaining in the second overtime period. The Red Raiders crossed the ball into the box, and Texas keeper Alexa Gaul came of her line to play it. But Gaul mishandled the ball, leaving Raider forward Tiffini Smith with the ball 10 yards from an empty net. Campanelli reacted quickly and retreated back into the goal in time to head out a shot by Smith that would have won the game.

“Once you’re in golden goal, any minute of the game you’ve got to stay focused,” Campanelli said. “Once the ball goes past you, you do whatever you can to get behind the goal. I was fortunate enough to be at the right place at the right time.”

<em>— Additional reporting by Lauren Giudice</em> 

Texas finished their weekend in Austin strong on Sunday night as junior midfielder Kylie Doniak led the Longhorns to their first Big 12 win of the year in a 1-0 victory over Baylor.

Doniak scored the only goal of the match in the 12th minute off of a free kick from the far right side of the field near the sideline. Her shot took a bounce and found the back of the net. This was Doniak’s third goal of the year and second game winner.

In the 13th minute, Doniak was given the opportunity to give the Longhorns a 2-0 lead with a penalty kick. But Baylor goalie Courtney Seelhorst saved it.

The first 30 minutes of the game were dominated by Texas with shots by Kylie Doniak, Lexi Harris and Hannah Higgins. Sophomore Kristen Cummins, Texas’ leading goal scorer, had a header shot that went wide in the 25th minute.

In the last 10 minutes, Baylor had three shots. In the 84th minute, Baylor’s Lisa Sliwinski attempted to tie the game with a header, but Alexa Gaul made a great save.

Texas outshot Baylor 10-8 and goalie Alexa Gaul had five saves in her sixth shutout of the year.

Baylor played recklessly and received 23 fouls throughout the game and four yellow cards issued to Georgia Mullins, Kat Ludlow, Karlee Summey and Vic Hoffman.

Texas is now 8-3-3 overall and 1-2-2 in league, despite tying with Texas Tech 0-0 on Friday at home. The game went into two 10-minute overtime periods, but neither team could end the game with a golden goal. The Longhorns dominated most of the game but were unable to get anything past Red Raider goal keeper Erin Wikelius.

“We actually played pretty well, but there’s two parts to it,” said Texas head coach Chris Petrucelli. “You’ve got to play well and score well, and we didn’t score well.”

The Longhorns started off the game on the attack, putting the Red Raiders on their heels early. Texas kept pushing the ball into Texas Tech territory, which created chances from corner kicks. The Longhorns took six corner kicks in the first half and had 12 for the game.

When Texas wasn’t getting chances off corners, forward Leah Fortune created the offense for the Longhorns. In the 23rd minute, she dribbled through three Red Raider defenders and dropped it off to a wide open Higgins, who let a shot go from the 18-yard box. The ball was headed for the far corner, but Wikelius made a diving save to keep the ball out of the net.

Fortune continued to generate offense for Texas in the second half. Fortune drew a foul 7 yards outside the box in the 57th minute, which set up a free kick for midfielder Kylie Doniak. Doniak sent the kick through a four-man wall but didn’t get enough on the ball, and Wikelius was able to stop the foray without too much trouble.

Although Texas was able to put up 15 shots on Wikelius, she was able to avoid trouble because most of those were sent wide of the goal. Of the 15, only four made it on net.
“I think a lot of time, we’re looking for that perfect goal,” Doniak said. “We were a little bit unlucky today.”

As much as the Texas offense struggled, the defense excelled. Senior Erica Campanelli was charged with defending star Baylor midfielder Taylor Lytle for the game, who was an all-Big 12 selection last season and has three game-winning goals this season.

“We gave up very few scoring chances,” Petrucelli said. “I felt we had them bottled up where they weren’t creating much. Erica [Campanelli] was certainly a part of that.”

Campanelli was strong all match but made the play of the game with seven minutes remaining in the second overtime period. The Red Raiders crossed the ball into the box, and Texas keeper Alexa Gaul came of her line to play it. But Gaul mishandled the ball, leaving Raider forward Tiffini Smith with the ball 10 yards from an empty net. Campanelli reacted quickly and retreated back into the goal in time to head out a shot by Smith that would have won the game.

“Once you’re in golden goal, any minute of the game you’ve got to stay focused,” Campanelli said. “Once the ball goes past you, you do whatever you can to get behind the goal. I was fortunate enough to be at the right place at the right time.”