Art Briles

Baylor defeated Texas on Dec. 7 in Waco last season to clinch the first Big 12 title in school history.

Photo Credit: Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff

Before Art Briles became the head football coach at Baylor, the Bears went 3-9 in 2007. Since then, Baylor has won 48 games and claimed its first Big 12 Championship in school history in 2013. 

While the Bears turned their program around, the Longhorns trended downward. Texas’ record since 2010 is 32-23. 

Texas has lost two of its four games this season, while Baylor is undefeated and ranked No. 7 in the country. Despite Baylor holding the upper hand, the Longhorn players have been calling out the Bears heading into their matchup this Saturday.

“They’re still Baylor,” senior wide receiver John Harris said. “Just because they started playing better, that’s good for them. We’re still Texas.”

Senior cornerback Quandre Diggs refused to recognize Baylor’s self-proclaimed title of “WRU” — Wide Receiver University. When asked about the Bears’ new moniker, Diggs said that “nobody’s ever heard of that.”

The quotes from Harris and Diggs provided bulletin board material for the Bears. Online message boards are full of people calling out Harris for being entitled and Diggs for being unaware of Baylor’s wide receiver prowess.

Texas players need to be aware of Baylor’s on-field ability, as the Bears lead the nation in points per game with 56.8. Baylor’s passing offense is ranked fourth in the nation, averaging 401.3 passing yards per game. Baylor also averages 239.8 rushing yards per game. 

The Baylor offense will be hard for Texas to defend, but the Bears’ defense will give the Longhorns their biggest challenge. Defensively, the Bears are sixth in the country in total defense, giving up just 250.5 yards per game. Baylor’s defense has recorded 18 sacks this season, a troubling stat for Texas’ young and inexperienced offensive line. While sophomore quarterback Tyrone Swoopes has only thrown one interception this season, the Bears may exploit the young quarterback, as they are the eighth best team in the nation in scoring defense.

The Longhorns will have their hands full Saturday, but the coaches are fully aware of the challenge in front of them.

“We know this — it’s a big test this week,” head coach Charlie Strong said. “They just generate points. It’s almost like watching a video game. You watch a play, it’s a touchdown there, and the next time they come back up, hand the ball off then they go score another touchdown. The quarterback is unbelievable — a Heisman candidate. Coach Briles has done an unbelievable job with that program. So it’s going to be a major test for us. We’re going to have to play well. We’re going to have to play above our head.”

While Texas may challenge Baylor early in the game, the Longhorns must realize that the Bears won’t easily be beat. Texas isn’t the Texas of old, and Baylor isn’t “just”
Baylor anymore. 

Photo Credit: Jenna VonHofe | Daily Texan Staff

DALLAS ‒ The Big 12 unofficially kicked off the 2014 football season at the conference’s media days at the Omni Dallas Hotel on Monday.

The event began with Commissioner Bob Bowlsby’s annual State of the Conference address. Bowlsby delivered an eye-opening speech in which he warned that collegiate sports as we know it may be vastly different in the near future.

“Change is coming,” Bowlsby said. “There is change afoot, and some of it is going to be unhappy change because I think it will ultimately reduce the number of opportunities for young people to go to college and participate in sports.”

Bowlsby was followed by five of the 10 Big 12 Coaches: Art Briles, Charlie Weis, Mike Gundy, Gary Patterson and Kliff Kingsbury

Baylor: Briles preparing Bears to defend Big 12 title

The Baylor Bears won their first Big 12 title last season. Despite being picked to finished second by the Big 12 media behind Oklahoma, head coach Art Briles is teaching the team how to defend its title and the adversity that comes with the territory.

“We see ourselves as the guy fighting hard, scratching hard to try to get some recognition and some respect,” Briles said. “We have to learn how to prepare as the hunted as opposed to the hunter.  We've always been the hunter.  And I don't want to lose that edge and that attitude.”

Kansas: Weis, Jayhawks fighting for relevancy

The Kansas Jayhawks are six years removed from their victory in the 2008 Orange Bowl, and it’s been a rough road ever since.

Jayhawks coach Charlie Weis, in his third year as head coach, knows the team needs to improve.

“We haven't done a thing in the two years I've been here,” Weis said. “But our team very clearly knows what our expectations are. There's no hiding it.”

Oklahoma State: Gundy looking for quarterback to replace Chelf

The Oklahoma State Cowboys were a game away from winning the Big 12 Championship last season because of great quarterback play from Clint Chelf. Chelf threw for 2,173 yards, 17 passing touchdowns and 7 rushing touchdowns.

But now that Chelf is gone, Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy is trying to find his replacement and leading the way is junior J.W. Walsh.

“Walsh took the majority of the reps in the spring with the 1s and has had a good summer,” Gundy said. “Based on the style of play or the plan of attack that we want to use, we have a little bit of flexibility with the quarterback that we put in the game at that time.”

TCU: Patterson, Horned Frogs looking to overcome bowl-less season

For the first time in 16 seasons, TCU and head coach Gary Patterson missed out on playing in a bowl game. Despite the frustrating 2013 season, Patterson and the Horned Frogs are preparing themselves for a comeback.

“We got back to a Bowl game,” Patterson said. “So for me, it's all been about understanding it wasn't broke; you've got to make sure you go out — gotta be physical, gotta trust each other, gotta play together as a group, and also, you've got to find a way to make those plays at the end of the ballgame.”

Texas Tech: Kingsbury settling into coaching Red Raiders in second season

Under head coach Kliff Kingsbury, the Texas Tech Red Raiders rushed out to a 7-0 start in 2013. The Raiders followed that winning streak with a five-game losing streak. But a win in the Holiday Bowl revitalized Kingsbury and the team heading into the 2014 season.

“Yeah, [winning the Holiday Bowl] was huge,” Kinsbury said. “It proved to our team and our players that if you keep working hard and you keep focusing on your job and your responsibility, good things will happen.”

Texas will have to look outside of the I-35 interstate to find its next head coach it seems.

Friday, amid much speculation about his possible interest in the Longhorns' job, Baylor head coach Art Briles released a statement maintaining his desire to stay as the Bears' head coach.

"I have no desire to pursue other coaching positions," Briles said. "As I've said many times, I am both humbled and honored to be the head coach at Baylor University, and believe we have something special going here. I look forward to leading the Bears onto the field next fall at McLane Stadium and defending our Big 12 championship that our players and coaches worked so hard to win this season."

Briles led Baylor to its first Big 12 championship and BCS bowl appearance this season, which included a win over Texas to secure the conference championship in each team’s regular season finale. Briles, a long-time Texas high school coach, recently signed a contract extension that will keep him with the Bears through 2023.

"There is tremendous excitement for our program's future, and I look forward to many more great seasons at Baylor," Briles said. "There is tremendous commitment from our University leadership, athletic administration, coaches and student-athletes - it truly is a great time to be a Baylor Bear."

Photo Credit: The Associated Press

Redshirt junior Bryce Petty didn’t have the easiest shoes to fill. He watched Robert Griffin III walk across the Heisman stage. Then he watched as Nick Florence broke Griffin’s single-season Baylor record for passing yards.

“Those guys have put a lot of standards up there that are going to be tough to beat,” head coach Art Briles said on Petty following Griffin and Florence before the season. “But Petty has been around everything. He understands he’s got the physical presence and ability to do it. What we gotta do is just let him get in situations and let him create his own identity.”

Coming into the season under-the-radar, he didn’t feel much pressure. It was the sophomore running back—Lache Seastrunk—who everyone thought of as a Heisman Trophy candidate. He averaged nearly eight yards per carry the year before and looked poised to carry the Bears offense.

Despite Seastrunk’s solid season, it is actually Petty who has carried Baylor and thrown his name into the Heisman discussion.

“I think he’s been phenomenal and the thing that impresses me is, first of all, his leadership because you never really know about someone until you go through the fire with them — go through some kind of adversity with them,” Briles said. “Fortunately, we haven’t had a lot of adversity but when we have, he’s been really strong and really solid.”

Petty is currently eighth in the country in passing yards, leading the highest scoring offense in the nation. All he can do now is reflect on his past years on the bench and marvel in the current year leading a Top 10 team.

“I think God has a very funny way of writing out and planning our story
better than we could,” Petty said. “If I had it my own way I would’ve been playing since I was a freshman and all that stuff. But to have the team that we have now, I couldn’t have wrote it better myself.”

Texas realizes what they are up against — a Baylor team that isn’t the highest scoring team in the nation for no reason. When watching film, Texas’ defensive coordinator Greg Robinson can only admire the offense he prepares to solve.

“I take pictures on my screen so I can print them just so I can save some of these,” Robinson said. “I want to show them to my grandkids so I can say, ‘This is how you use a field,’”

Everything begins with Petty.

“He’s a good quarterback,” Robinson said. “He has good weapons around him. He knows how to get the ball to those guys.”

But what scares the Texas defense is his ability to make plays on the ground. He has twice as many rushing touchdowns as Oklahoma State quarterback Clint Chelf, who torched the Longhorns on the ground with 95 yards and two touchdowns.

“I hope he’s not as good,” Robinson said. “Quite frankly, I think we helped Chelf a little bit. I’m not taking anything away from him, I think he did a nice job, but this guy has run for yardage just like Chelf has and a couple others too.”

With all the success he has had so far, Petty knows more lies ahead, and is excited for the final game of this season with possible BCS
implications.

“There are a lot of memories, a lot of high points with this season and the best part is it’s not over,” Petty said. “We got two more games. One more game that will sum up everything and I am very blessed, very humbled to be a part of it.”

And Petty isn’t leaving Waco anytime soon. The NFL will have to wait.

“I definitely will be back next year,” he said.

Baylor head coach Art Briles addresses media members at Big 12 Media Days in Dallas. Briles and the Bears are looking to improve on a 10-3 record from a year ago.

Photo Credit: Pu Ying Huang | Daily Texan Staff

The Baylor Bears may have lost their top three offensive threats from a year ago to the NFL Draft, but head coach Art Briles doesn’t see that being an issue as his team prepares for the start of a new season.

“We’ve got some holes to fill. We understand that,” Briles said. “In general I think our brand is probably as good as it’s ever been on a national level. What we have to do now is maintain it, and that’s where my inspiration, passion and drive is going to come from.”

The Bears are coming out of their best season in more than 30 years after a 10-3 finish in 2011, which included the team’s first bowl victory since 1992. But the loss of Heisman-winning quarterback Robert Griffin III as well as leading wide receiver Kendall Wright and running back Terrance Ganaway have many wondering if the Bears can duplicate their success from a season ago.

“We have to fill in the gaps because Robert created a lot of gaps,” Briles said. “We have to fill that in with a variety of different methods, schematically and personnel-wise, that will give us an opportunity to stay at the level we finished at last year.”

One of the players who will attempt to fill the massive hole left by Griffin III and others is senior quarterback Nick Florence. Florence would have two remaining years of eligibility, but he was forced to relinquish his redshirt late last season after Griffin III suffered a concussion against Texas Tech. In that game, Florence threw for 151 yards and two touchdowns while rushing for another score, eventually leading the Bears to a 66-42 win over the Red Raiders.

It was then that Briles knew Florence would do anything to see the Bears win.

“That’s where his drive is — being a good football player that contributes to Baylor being successful,” Briles said. “I have a tremendous amount of confidence in the passion, energy and fearlessness he’s going to bring to the table.”

Briles isn’t the only one confident in Florence’s ability to lead the Bears. Senior center Ivory Wade feels the Bears are right where they left off at the end of last season.

“We’re going to be the same offense we were last year,” Wade said. “Very explosive and hopefully rack up a lot of yards.”

Those yards will have to come from somewhere, and that’s precisely where fifth-year senior wide receiver Terrance Williams comes in.

Williams played in all 13 games last season, including 11 at receiver on his way to 957 receiving yards and 11 touchdowns. His receiving totals were second on the team, trailing only Wright, who is now a Tennessee Titan. At 6-foot-2, Williams provides a big target for Florence and should emerge as this year’s most reliable downfield threat.

“He’s going to blow up this year,” Wade said.

The Bears also return Tevin Reese, Lanear Sampson and Levi Norwood at receiver in addition to recent Michigan transfer Darryl Stonum. The loss of Wright hurts, but there are several players who are capable of working as a unit in order to replicate Wright’s receiving totals from last year.

With all the attention paid to Griffin III and Wright a year ago, it’s easy to forget that the Bears also had a 1,500 yard rusher, Ganaway, who is now a member of the New York Jets.

Ganaway found the endzone 21 times on the ground in 2011, and his production will be greatly missed as well.

At the moment, senior Jarred Salubi is listed as the Bears’ No. 1 running back. He’s played in 38 career games, tied for the most on the team.

“Jarred is an outstanding back. He’s able to make guys miss in space and he’s big and strong enough to be powerful inside,” Briles said.

Someone will have to step up in order to replace Ganaway, and that someone could be Lache Seastrunk. A graduate of nearby Temple High School and former Oregon Duck, Seastrunk joined the Bears in 2011 but was forced to sit out the entire season per NCAA transfer regulations.

“Lache is a very dynamic player that has three years left and we’re anxious to see what he can do when there’s people in the stands hollering, because he’s got ability and that’s something that’s hard to hide,” Briles said. “We’re going to have him open up the jacket and let it show.”

It won’t be an easy task replacing the drafted players on the offensive side of the ball, but the pieces are there.

“Perceptions change and there’s still people who are going to write us off, and that’s the way it’s always going to be,” Florence said. “We want to earn some respect. We’ve won a bowl game and got to 10 wins, so now we want to win a Big 12 Championship.”

 The Baylor Bears may have lost their top three offensive threats from a year ago to the NFL Draft, but head coach Art Briles doesn’t see that being an issue as his team prepares for the start of a new season.

“We’ve got some holes to fill. We understand that,” Briles said. “In general I think our brand is probably as good as it’s ever been on a national level. What we have to do now is maintain it, and that’s where my inspiration, passion and drive is going to come from.”

The Bears are coming out of their best season in more than 30 years after a 10-3 finish in 2011, which included the team’s first bowl victory since 1992. But the loss of Heisman-winning quarterback Robert Griffin III as well as leading wide receiver Kendall Wright and running back Terrance Ganaway have many wondering if the Bears can duplicate their success from a season ago.

“We have to fill in the gaps because Robert created a lot of gaps,” Briles said. “We have to fill that in with a variety of different methods, schematically and personnel-wise, that will give us an opportunity to stay at the level we finished at last year.”

One of the players who will attempt to fill the massive hole left by Griffin III and others is senior quarterback Nick Florence. Florence would have two remaining years of eligibility, but he was forced to relinquish his redshirt late last season after Griffin III suffered a concussion against Texas Tech. In that game, Florence threw for 151 yards and two touchdowns while rushing for another score, eventually leading the Bears to a 66-42 win over the Red Raiders.

It was then that Briles knew Florence would do anything to see the Bears win.

“That’s where his drive is — being a good football player that contributes to Baylor being successful,” Briles said. “I have a tremendous amount of confidence in the passion, energy and fearlessness he’s going to bring to the table.”

Briles isn’t the only one confident in Florence’s ability to lead the Bears. Senior center Ivory Wade feels the Bears are right where they left off at the end of last season.

“We’re going to be the same offense we were last year,” Wade said. “Very explosive and hopefully rack up a lot of yards.”

Those yards will have to come from somewhere, and that’s precisely where fifth-year senior wide receiver Terrance Williams comes in.

Williams played in all 13 games last season, including 11 at receiver on his way to 957 receiving yards and 11 touchdowns. His receiving totals were second on the team, trailing only Wright, who is now a Tennessee Titan. At 6-foot-2, Williams provides a big target for Florence and should emerge as this year’s most reliable downfield threat.

“He’s going to blow up this year,” Wade said.

The Bears also return Tevin Reese, Lanear Sampson and Levi Norwood at receiver in addition to recent Michigan transfer Darryl Stonum. The loss of Wright hurts, but there are several players who are capable of working as a unit in order to replicate Wright’s receiving totals from last year.

With all the attention paid to Griffin III and Wright a year ago, it’s easy to forget that the Bears also had a 1,500 yard rusher, Ganaway, who is now a member of the New York Jets.

Ganaway found the endzone 21 times on the ground in 2011, and his production will be greatly missed as well.

At the moment, senior Jarred Salubi is listed as the Bears’ No. 1 running back. He’s played in 38 career games, tied for the most on the team.

“Jarred is an outstanding back. He’s able to make guys miss in space and he’s big and strong enough to be powerful inside,” Briles said.

Someone will have to step up in order to replace Ganaway, and that someone could be Lache Seastrunk. A graduate of nearby Temple High School and former Oregon Duck, Seastrunk joined the Bears in 2011 but was forced to sit out the entire season per NCAA transfer regulations.

“Lache is a very dynamic player that has three years left and we’re anxious to see what he can do when there’s people in the stands hollering, because he’s got ability and that’s something that’s hard to hide,” Briles said. “We’re going to have him open up the jacket and let it show.”

It won’t be an easy task replacing the drafted players on the offensive side of the ball, but the pieces are there.

“Perceptions change and there’s still people who are going to write us off, and that’s the way it’s always going to be,” Florence said. “We want to earn some respect. We’ve won a bowl game and got to 10 wins, so now we want to win a Big 12 Championship.”

Robert Griffin is a one-of-a-kind athlete, and the Baylor Bears are doing everything they can to spread the word. Among the pamphlets and guides made available to the press at the Big 12 Media Days sat a stack of notepads with Griffin’s face emblazoned on the front. On the reverse side, quotes from the nation’s top college coaches and leading analysts praised Griffin’s ability.

“Absolutely amazing,” said Texas head coach Mack Brown.

“Extremely gifted,” Auburn head coach Gene Chizik wrote.

And the catchiest of them all — “The Baylor Blur,” from the Winston-Salem Journal.

He’s even got his own website, created by the Bears athletic program. The site, BU-RG3.com, is still under construction, but all signs point to the site being dedicated to his Heisman campaign.

The praise is justified. Griffin holds the Big 12 career record for lowest interception percentage, at 1.4 percent. He also helped Baylor go to their first bowl game since 1994, and he’s not stopping there. Early Heisman watches have Griffin among the candidates for the 2011 season. However, Griffin isn’t buying into the talk just yet.

“I’ve always said that the Heisman is a team award,” Griffin said. “If the team is doing well and everyone is playing together, that’s when you can start talking about it.”

Humbling words coming from a player that many around the league have accused of “trash-talking” on the field. Bears head coach Art Briles sees Griffin’s behavior on the field in a different light.

“Robert is a confident athlete with reality to back up what he’s saying on the field,” Briles said.

If anyone knows Griffin as a player, it’s Briles. While the head coach at Houston in 2007, Briles recruited Griffin to come play for the Cougars. Griffin initially committed to Houston, but after Briles landed the head coaching job at Baylor, Griffin made the switch as well.

From that point on, the face of Baylor football changed. Griffin immediately became the centerpiece of the entire Baylor athletic program. He was the crowning achievement for a school that has had trouble bringing in top talent from around the state. In came the 6-foot-3-inch, 215 pound Griffin, and he brought more than speed and a high football IQ to the program. The signing of Griffin opened the door for other blue-chip players to come to Waco as well.

Griffin’s first year with the Bears was more than the team could have asked for. He started 11 of 12 games, recorded 13 of 23 passes for 241 yards in an upset win over Texas A&M and also won the Big 12 Freshman of the Year award. His quick start with the team couldn’t stop the Bears from going 4-8 in 2008, and three games into the 2009 season, things came to a crashing halt when Griffin tore his ACL. He sat out the remainder of the season and was granted a medical redshirt since he had not played for more than 30 percent of the season. Griffin was able to make it back on the field in 2010 but even Briles admits he wasn’t at full strength then.

“We saw a little hesitation last year,” Briles said.

The arrival of Griffin has revived a fledgling football program in Baylor, and in 2010 he and the Bears made a full recovery.

Their appearance in the Texas Bowl served as a reminder that one player can indeed turn an entire program around. The Bears lost to Illinois 38-14, however, it is that loss that served as fuel for offseason preparation. Griffin made it clear that simply making it to a bowl game isn’t going to cut it this season.

“We’re not just content with sitting at the table — we want dessert,” Griffin said. 

Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III jokes around during NCAA college football Big 12 Media Days. Though he battled injuries, Griffin has taken the Bear’s football program from obscurity to a potential conference powerhouse in a short amount of time.

Photo Credit: The Associated Press

Robert Griffin is a one-of-a-kind athlete and the Baylor Bears are doing everything they can to spread the word. Among the pamphlets and guides made available to the press at the Big 12 Media Days sat a stack of notepads with Griffin’s face emblazoned on the front. On the reverse side were quotes from the nation’s top college coaches and leading analysts praising Griffin’s ability.

“Absolutely amazing,” said Texas head coach Mack Brown.

“Extremely gifted,” Auburn head coach Gene Chizik wrote.

And the catchiest of them all — “The Baylor Blur,” from the Winston-Salem Journal.

He’s even got his own website, created by the Bears athletic program. The site, BU-RG3.com, is still under construction, but all signs point to the site being dedicated to his Heisman campaign.

The praise is justified. Griffin holds the Big 12 career record for lowest interception percentage, at 1.4. He also helped Baylor to their first bowl game since 1994, and he’s not stopping there. Early Heisman watches have Griffin among the candidates for the 2011 season. However, Griffin isn’t buying into the talk just yet.

“I’ve always said that the Heisman is a team award,” Griffin said. “If the team is doing well and everyone is playing together that’s when you can start talking about it.”

Humbling words coming from a player that many around the league have accused of “trash-talking” on the field. Bears head coach Art Briles sees Griffin’s behavior on the field in a different light.

“Robert is a confident athlete with reality to back up what he’s saying on the field,” Briles said.

If anyone knows Griffin as a player, it’s Briles. While the head coach at Houston in 2007, Briles recruited Griffin to come play for the Cougars. Griffin initially committed to Houston, but after Briles landed the head coaching job at Baylor, Griffin made the switch as well.

From that point on, the face of Baylor football was changed. Griffin immediately became the centerpiece of the entire Baylor athletic program. He was the crowning achievement for a school that has had trouble bringing in top talent from around the state. In came the 6-foot-3-inch, 215 pound Griffin, and he brought more than speed and a high football IQ to the program. The signing of Griffin opened the door for other blue chip players to come to Waco as well.

Griffin’s first year with the Bears was more than the team could have ever asked for. He started 11 of 12 games, recorded 13 of 23 passes for 241 yards in an upset win over Texas A&M and also won the Big 12 Freshman of the Year award. His quick start with the team couldn’t stop the Bears from going 4-8 in 2008, and three games into the 2009 season, things came to a crashing halt when Griffin tore his ACL. He sat out the remainder of the season and was granted a medical redshirt since he had not played for more than 30 percent of the season. Griffin was able to make it back on the field in 2010 but even Briles admits he wasn’t at full strength then.

“We saw a little hesitation last year,” Briles said.

The arrival of Griffin has revived a fledgling football program in Baylor, and in 2010 he and the Bears had made a full recovery. Their appearance in the Texas Bowl served as a reminder that one player can indeed turn an entire program around. The Bears did lose to Illinois 38-14, however, it is that loss that has served as fuel for offseason preparation. Griffin made it clear that simply making it to a bowl game isn’t going to cut it this season.

“We’re not just content with sitting at the table, we want dessert,” Griffin said.

Printed on Thursday, July 28, 2011 as: Baylor star poised to make Bears conference contenders, ‘Absolutely amazing’ Griffin placed on award watch lists by national media, coaches

Mack Brown addresses the media on the first day of the 2011 Big 12 Media Days.

Photo Credit: Thomas Allison | Daily Texan Staff

As the coaches from five Big 12 schools answered questions on day one of Big 12 Media Days, there was one topic that none could avoid — the Longhorn Network. The unprecedented $300 million deal has fans and the media from College Station to Columbia up in arms. But what do the coaches think about the deal?

Texas A&M head coach Mike Sherman was the first to encounter the inevitable questions. Recent stirrings about the airing of high school games on the Longhorn Network have some schools worried about an unfair advantage, but Sherman didn’t seem too bothered by it all.

“I’ve got enough on my own plate,” Sherman said. “I’m focused on my job, and winning that first ball game.”

Baylor head coach Art Briles faced the media next and, lo and behold, he too was asked if he thought the network would bring an unfair advantage to Austin.

“Not a bit,” Briles said. “They’re pretty hard to recruit against anyway.”

Briles went on to praise Texas head coach Mack Brown.

“Mack has been great, and that’s a fact,” he said. “In the recruiting world, facts are all that matter.”

Others, like Oklahoma State’s Mike Gundy, chose to sidestep the ethical question regarding the showing of high school games on a college sports network.

“I’ve got faith in our athletic director Mike Holder and [Big 12 Commissioner] Dan Beebe to sort things out,” Gundy said.

Missouri head coach Gary Pinkel had a decidedly firm stance on the Longhorn Network, citing a “lack of common sense” for the network to even attempt to show high school games on air.

“Showing high school games, it’s absurd,” he said.

Last but not least, Mack Brown shared his thoughts on the network’s arrival. Brown mentioned that stations like ESPN currently air high school games, even including several teams from the state of Texas. While noting that players that play on a major channel like ESPN get noticed by bigger schools, Brown remained confident that airing high school games would have no ill effects in terms of ease of recruiting or otherwise.

“The communities in Texas and their athletes that would otherwise not get noticed or receive any recognition will become accessible through this new network,” Brown said.

He still acknowledged the outrage.

“If I didn’t have it, I’d be mad,” he said.