Brigham Young University

Photo Credit: Amy Zhang | Daily Texan Staff

The University Co-op main store on Guadalupe Street will be shelving textbooks alphabetically by the first author’s last name, instead of by class title, for the fall semester.

Michael Kiely, the Co-op’s director of course materials, said shelving books by class was “very inefficient.”

“A lot of courses here at UT are cross-listed," Kiely said.

Under the old system, the Co-op put the same set of books in multiple places in the store. Kiely said books would run out in one class but still be available in another, causing confusion.

According to Kiely, the Co-op decided to reachout to other campuses and visited the Brigham Young University Bookstore, which sorts its books alphabetically by author.

“Prior to this year, we had really big tags that were hard to read,” said Kristen Hilbert, the Co-op’s director of e-commerce. Hilbert said the new tag would only list the author’s name, the book’s title, new price, used price and rental price – the class won’t be listed.

“Our dream would be to have electronic tags,” she said.

Hilbert, a UT alumna, said the store now has a large area for computers and printers where students can print out their reading lists, an idea also adapted from the BYU store.

When it comes to price competition, Hilbert said the Co-op strives to be “transparent” through its online price comparison system – accessible from the class listing on the University’s website – which compares the Co-op’s in-store prices to other sellers’ online prices. In some cases, the Co-op has also successfully negotiated with publishers to get specialized editions for UT students with significantly lower prices, she said.

Darren Jones, manager of the Co-op’s east location on Medical Arts Street, said his store will wait to see how the main store handles the change and continue shelving books by class for the fall semester.

March Madness is not just for basketball fans this year. Last week, UT’s accounting department won a national accounting championship based on this year’s NCAA tournament bracket.

The competition, organized by Brigham Young University, compares the quantity of articles published in top accounting journals within the past six years. The universities included are based on the 64 teams competing in the NCAA Division I Basketball Championship.

Accounting professor Steven Kachelmeier said he attributes the department’s success to the University’s established history and diverse staff.

“We have the tradition and the scale,” Kachelmeier said. “We have courses in every facet of accounting that gives us the skill set to have a diversity of faculty that covers a multitude of areas reasonably well. We’re a pretty big player in the accounting domain. As long as the basketball team does its job of getting us in the bracket, we’ll win.”

This year, UT defeated Ohio State University in the final round, securing its third win since 2010.

Lillian Mills, chair of the accounting department in the McCombs School of Business, said the department’s faculty are talented on an individual level.

“In basketball language, we aren’t a team with a single outside shooter — we have such a deep roster that any one of my colleagues could be the star on another team.” Mills said.

Kristen Valentine, who went to BYU for undergraduate coursework and is now a UT accounting graduate student, said she used BYU’s national ranking system when selecting UT for graduate school. 

“I did spend time looking at BYU’s rankings to help identify programs to apply to for graduate school and I was excited to see the breadth of topic and method in research at UT,” Valentine said. “I really liked the culture of the department. Students were treated as collaborators and co-workers.”

April Stockwell, communications and marketing manager for McCombs, said she thinks the department will continue to do well because of the devotion of the faculty at the business school.

“We have a solid group of faculty focused on providing students a solid accounting education while furthering accounting research,” Stockwell said. “They innovate both in the classrooms by using technology where it’s applicable and in developing high quality research that is well-respected by their peers. Our department is not only a solid team, everyone is passionate about what they do and it shows in rankings and student satisfaction.”

Photo Credit: Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff

Texas pounded BYU inside for most of the game, but the Longhorns could not stop Cougar junior guard Tyler Haws down the stretch. The 6-foot-5-inch guard scored 19 of BYU’s final 21 points leading to an 86-82 Cougar victory.

The Longhorns (4-1) and Cougars (5-1) were locked in a back-and-forth battle, as neither team held a lead larger than five points the entire game. But Texas couldn’t find an answer for Haws’ shooting late.

BYU led 81-80 at just under a minute left. But after a stellar defensive possession by Texas, the Cougars had only a few seconds left on the shot clock. A hard screen near the right corner gave Haws enough space to take a one-footed jumper from just inside the arc, which, despite twisting his body 90 degrees in the air, touched nothing but net.

Texas had a few opportunities for the equalizer, but freshman guard Damarcus Croaker’s attempt from behind the arc clanged off the back rim with 13 seconds remaining, sealing BYU’s victory.

The Longhorns, who entered the game with five scorers averaging double digits, received another balanced offensive effort in the loss.

Sophomore guard Javan Felix led the Longhorns with 17 points on 6-for-18 shooting, while adding four assists, three rebounds and four steals. Felix, who started the first three games of the year, came off the bench for the second game in a row with Croaker starting in his place. Felix has shown a knack for providing a scoring presence in the sixth man role, averaging 15.5 points over the last two games.

Croaker missed the potential game-tying shot, but contributed 14 points, which included a trio of threes, and four rebounds.

Texas’ pair of sophomore centers, Cameron Ridley and Prince Ibeh, each had productive evenings against a smaller Cougar frontcourt. Ridley posted his first double-double of the season, 12 points and 10 rebounds, while adding six blocks. Ibeh added 11 points and six rebounds. It’s only the second time in Ibeh’s career he surpassed double digits in points.

Jackson Jeffcoat and the rest of the Longhorn front seven have stepped up their run defense since the arrival of new defensive coordinator Greg Robinson. Since getting run over by BYU, the Texas defense has consistently improved each week.

Photo Credit: Chelsea Purgahn | Daily Texan Staff

Following a loss against Brigham Young University in which they surrendered 550 rushing yards and an average of 7.6 yards per carry, the Longhorns vowed they wouldn’t let another opponent ravage their run defense.  

“After that BYU game, we weren’t going to let that happen again,” junior defensive end Cedric Reed said. “We left so much on the field. We just told ourselves we’re not going to let that happen no more, and ever since then it’s just been clicking for us slowly, but it’s kicked off during conference play.”

The Longhorns’ defenders have backed that statement over their past five games, limiting opponents since then to an average of 152.6 rushing yards per game on 3.76 yards per carry. This impressive stretch coincides with the hiring of defensive coordinator Greg Robinson. Senior defensive end Jackson Jeffcoat believes Robinson’s ability to simplify the defense allows players to better succeed in their assignments.

“Everybody’s doing their responsibility,” Jeffcoat said. "We’re making sure we’re in our gaps, making sure we’re not looking into the backfield when we don’t need to. We’re kind of playing our keys.”

The Longhorns kicked off their turnaround against the run in their first conference game of the season, when they held Kansas State to 115 rushing yards and 3.0 yards per carry. Overall, Texas has limited its four Big 12 opponents this season to an average of 122.8 yards on the ground per game.

Texas managed to ramp up its run defense even further in its last two games. The Longhorns held an Oklahoma team averaging 246 rushing yards entering the contest to just 130 yards on the ground, and they limited TCU to 45 rushing yards on an average of just 1.9 yards per carry.

Head coach Mack Brown believes Texas’ revamped run defense has been the key to the Longhorns’ turnaround on defense in the last two weeks because doing so has forced opponents into obvious passing situations.

“You stop the run, and that’s when you get your turnovers on second-and-long or third-and-long,” Brown said. “The total difference of what we’re seeing out of our front four now is that we’ve put the last two offenses in second-and-long and third-and-long and then you have the ability for Chris Whaley, Malcolm Brown and the two ends to get there.”

Senior cornerback Carrington Byndom seconded this, adding that being able to limit opposing run games is a step towards an early season objective.

“I think we’ve made more of an emphasis on stopping the run,” Byndom said. “If you can stop the run, then you make teams one-dimensional. It’s been a goal for us since the season started.”

Photo Credit: Charlie Pearce | Daily Texan Staff

Following the dismissal of Manny Diaz as defensive coordinator, Texas’ team and fans were in desperate need of a change. So naturally, when head coach Mack Brown named Greg Robinson the new defensive coordinator following the Longhorns’ blowout loss to Brigham Young University, people rejoiced more about Diaz’s departure than the arrival of the new face to the Texas defense. 

But following Texas’ most dominant defensive performance against Oklahoma in recent memory, it’s clear that Robinson isn’t just a stopgap until the end of the year — he made this defense believe.

His impact is most evident in the areas where Texas was weakest: putting pressure on opposing quarterbacks, causing turnovers and most importantly, rush defense. 

Under Diaz, Texas’ front four struggled to generate consistent pressure, combining for a single sack in the team’s first two games. But in the four games following Robinson’s promotion, the group totaled 10 sacks, two fumble recoveries, two interceptions and one touchdown. Senior defensive end Jackson Jeffcoat has been especially dominant in that stretch, racking up five sacks and a game-sealing interception against Iowa State. 

Thanks to a rejuvenated pass rush, the Longhorns have been more active in the turnover category as well, forcing eight in the last four games — most memorable being senior defensive tackle Chris Whaley’s pick-six against Oklahoma on Saturday. It is plays like Whaley’s, which gave Texas a 10-3 lead it never relinquished, that can reverse the flow of an entire season. 

But the most drastic change came with Texas’ run defense. It was only five weeks ago when BYU rushed for a school-record 550 yards against Texas, resulting in Diaz’s dismissal. 

With Robinson at the helm, things have changed drastically. Since a 44-23 loss to Ole Miss in which the Longhorns surrendered 272 yards on the ground — Robinson’s first game in his new role — this defense has stepped up, surrendering 446 rushing yards the past three games. Saturday’s performance against Oklahoma was especially impressive, as Texas held Oklahoma to 130 yards on the ground, well below the 246 yards per game it averaged entering the game. 

The defense is totally different than the one that was on the field a month ago, and a big part of that is Robinson. The results reflect an alteration in coaching and schematic approach but more so, they show a change in the team’s mental makeup. The Longhorn defense no longer appears timid or uninspired. Led by Robinson, this team is playing motivated defense. 

Photo Credit: Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff

After failing to score in the second half against Ole Miss last week, the Longhorns’ offense could be in even bigger trouble this Saturday.

Texas enters the week with five offensive starters battling injuries, headlined by junior quarterback David Ash, whose playing status is questionable. Ash missed Saturday’s game against the Rebels after sustaining injuries to his head and right shoulder on Sept. 7 against Brigham Young University.

Head coach Mack Brown said Ash returned to practice for a walk-through on Sunday, though his status for the rest of the week remains unclear. The training staff plans to evaluate Ash each morning, and Brown said the quarterback could be back in practice Tuesday if he passes the concussion tests.

“They’re monitoring him to see if he can return Tuesday,” Brown said. “They’ll work him out briefly in the morning and then they’ll allow him to return Tuesday afternoon if there’s no symptoms there.”

If Ash remains unable to play, Brown plans to start senior quarterback Case McCoy for the second straight week. McCoy completed 24 of 36 passes for 196 yards and a touchdown against Ole Miss.

Freshman quarterback Tyrone Swoopes may also factor into the game plan if Ash can’t play. Brown said the coaching staff discussed playing Swoopes last Saturday, but opted against it following McCoy’s productive first half.

“We talked about it and said if we need to play him, we’ll play him,” Brown said. “Case was doing well. We’re scoring points and moving the ball as an offense so [we decided to] leave him in.”

In addition to Ash, the Longhorns listed senior wide receiver Mike Davis as questionable because of a sprained ankle injury that occurred early in the game against the Rebels. Davis managed to remain on the field following the injury, but he wore a walking boot after the game.

The potential loss of Davis poses a major threat to the Longhorns’ passing game, as Texas already ruled out sophomore running back/wide receiver Daje Johnson for Saturday’s game. Johnson was unable to play against Ole Miss after hurting his left ankle against BYU one week earlier, and he has yet to shake the walking boot and return to the field.

With Johnson out, Texas named sophomore wide receiver Kendall Sanders as a starter for the second-straight week. Sanders hauled in seven passes for 55 yards against the Rebels and recorded a 51-yard kickoff return.

In addition, the Texas offense is injured up front, as senior right guard Mason Walters, with a hip injury, and junior right tackle Josh Cochran, with a shoulder injury, enter the week listed as questionable. Sophomore linemen Kennedy Estelle and Sedrick Flowers filled in admirably after Walters and Cochran left in the first half of last Saturday’s game, and Brown believes they have the ability to step up again if the starters are inactive.

“Most of the game really, Kennedy Estelle and Sedrick Flowers stepped up and played,” Brown said. “They have to step up and play if the other two can’t.”

Despite these injuries, the Longhorns believe their depth on offense allows them to maintain consistency if any starters are out. Co-offensive coordinator Major Applewhite refuses to use injuries as an excuse, preaching the need for the Texas backups to step up when pressed into action.

“There is an overall mentality of we have to go with who we’ve got and engineer a win out of the pieces that we have,” Applewhite said. “You can mope and complain, but that’s not where our staff is. Just move on and try to find a way to do it with this.”

After failing to score in the second half against Ole Miss last week, the Longhorns’ offense could be in even bigger trouble this Saturday.

Texas enters the week with five offensive starters battling injuries, headlined by junior quarterback David Ash, whose playing status is questionable. Ash missed Saturday’s game against the Rebels after sustaining injuries to his head and right shoulder on Sept. 7 against Brigham Young University.

Head coach Mack Brown said Ash returned to practice for a walk-through on Sunday, though his status for the rest of the week remains unclear. The training staff plans to evaluate Ash each morning, and Brown said the quarterback could be back in practice Tuesday if he passes the concussion tests.

“They’re monitoring him to see if he can return Tuesday,” Brown said. “They’ll work him out briefly in the morning and then they’ll allow him to return Tuesday afternoon if there’s no symptoms there.”

If Ash remains unable to play, Brown plans to start senior quarterback Case McCoy for the second straight week. McCoy completed 24 of 36 passes for 196 yards and a touchdown against Ole Miss.

Freshman quarterback Tyrone Swoopes may also factor into the game plan if Ash can’t play. Brown said the coaching staff discussed playing Swoopes last Saturday, but opted against it following McCoy’s productive first half.

“We talked about it and said if we need to play him, we’ll play him,” Brown said. “Case was doing well. We’re scoring points and moving the ball as an offense so [we decided to] leave him in.”

In addition to Ash, the Longhorns listed senior wide receiver Mike Davis as questionable because of a sprained ankle injury that occurred early in the game against the Rebels. Davis managed to remain on the field following the injury, but he wore a walking boot after the game.

The potential loss of Davis poses a major threat to the Longhorns’ passing game, as Texas already ruled sophomore running back/wide receiver Daje Johnson out for Saturday’s game. Johnson was unable to play against Ole Miss after hurting his left ankle against BYU one week earlier, and he has yet to shake the walking boot and return to the field.

With Johnson out, Texas named sophomore wide receiver Kendall Sanders as a starter for the second-straight week. Sanders hauled in seven passes for 55 yards against the Rebels, and recorded a 51-yard kickoff return.

In addition, the Texas offense is injured up front, as senior right guard Mason Walters, with a hip injury, and junior right tackle Josh Cochran, with a shoulder injury, enter the week listed as questionable. Sophomore linemen Kennedy Estelle and Sedrick Flowers filled in admirably after Walters and Cochran left in the first half of last Saturday’s game, and Brown believes they have the ability to step up again if the starters are inactive.

“Most of the game really, Kennedy Estelle and Sedrick Flowers stepped up and played,” Brown said. “They have to step up and play if the other two can’t.”

Despite these injuries, the Longhorns believe their depth on offense allows them to maintain consistency if any starters are out. Co-offensive coordinator Major Applewhite refuses to use injuries as an excuse, preaching the need for the Texas backups to step up when pressed into action.

“There is an overall mentality of we have to go with who we’ve got and engineer a win out of the pieces that we have,” Applewhite said. “You can mope and complain, but that’s not where our staff is. Just move on and try to find a way to do it with this.”

Photo Credit: Shelby Tauber | Daily Texan Staff

Texas running back and wide reciever Daje Johnson will not play in Saturday’s game against Ole Miss after suffering an ankle injury against BYU, Texas announced Monday.

On the third play against BYU, Johnson limped to the sideline and was eventually taken into the locker room with what is speculated to be a high ankle sprain.

“It’s really disappointing,” head coach Mack Brown said. “But injuries are part of the game. We’ve had a lot of those lately and we just have to respond to it.”

This news comes after Texas’ 40-21 loss to BYU, in which the offense struggled to produce and the sophomore back’s absence was evident.

“This sounds like an excuse, but a lot of the offense Major [Applewhite] planned was gone after the third play on Saturday,” Mack Brown said.

Johnson recorded two touchdowns with a total of 129 yards against New Mexico State in Week 1, helping Texas to a 49-point win. 

“Johnson is a big part of our offense when the play is called,” junior running back Malcolm Brown said. “Those guys in the training room do a great job at getting him healthy and getting him back as soon as possible. We just have to move on from it and keep playing.”

Applewhite claims he will have to move some players around without Johnson as a weapon. The offensive play-caller explained certain schemes will still work, just without the intensity Johnson produced.

“There’s certain things that he can do and certain plays that we wanted to get the ball in his hands for that will run but aren’t as explosive when you have those guys,” Applewhite said. “Some of the plays you had specifically for Johnson you’ll lose but in terms of the base offense that’ll remain the same.”  

In the fourth quarter of Saturday’s game, junior quarterback David Ash also left the contest with a head injury and shoulder injury. The quarterback will be evaluated day-by-day throughout the week and his status for Ole Miss is in question. 

If Ash is unable to start, senior Case McCoy will step into the starter’s role. During Sunday’s practice, McCoy took reps with the first team squad while freshman Tyrone Swoopes took reps with the second team. In addition, freshman running back Jalen Overstreet, who converted to running back this season, has been taking reps as the third-string quarterback.

Even without Ash, the Longhorns are ready to back up McCoy if he gets his opportunity. 

“We have all the confidence in the world [in Case] if David can’t play,” Malcolm Brown said. 

It was deja vu on Saturday evening. Texas appeared to be the 2012 team it didn’t want to be.  

After close to a two-hour weather delay, Brigham Young University and Texas took the field for a game that the Longhorns definitely want back. The 40-21 loss for Texas brought flashbacks of the 2012 team, the same defensive unit that was the worst in school history. 

“We didn’t get done what we needed to do on either side of the ball,” head coach Mack Brown said. “They’re smart. They understand that we didn’t get our job done as players or coaches.”

Texas started slow both offensively and defensively. The Longhorn defense gave up 349 rushing yards to BYU in the first half alone, the most it has allowed in one half in the last 10 seasons. In total, Manny Diaz’s defense gave up 550 yards on the ground, which broke a dubious record for the most rushing yards allowed in a single game in program history.  

Texas’ offense was without star Daje Johnson, who left the game in the first quarter with an ankle injury. It got worse for Texas when Ash eventually left the game after being shaken up on a scramble in the fourth quarter.

Major Applewhite’s offense struggled without Johnson, who is a key weapon for the Longhorns on the ground and in the air. Texas was only able to capitalize on three drives in the game, which was a problem Brown hoped to solve with the team’s new up-tempo offense.

“When you lose a guy that’s involved in packages, like Daje, obviously you’ve got to find somebody else to put in that place, and certain things immediately go out the window,” Applewhite said. 

In the second half, Texas showed no improvement. BYU quarterback Taysom Hill was able to lead his team down the field for another 13 points while the Longhorns failed to produce points on offense.

Diaz’s defense has faced criticism in the past for not being able to stop the run game, and the unit struggled once again Saturday night. Hill ran over Texas’ defense, recording 259 rushing yards — the second most yards in a single game in BYU history.

“They got after us,” Diaz said. “They outplayed us. The quarterback obviously was the difference in the game. We just could not execute getting stops. Very disappointing.” 

All Brown could do was explain the obvious and he did it quite simply.

“I didn’t think our coaches and our players lived up to what we needed to win tonight, including me,” Brown said.

Just one week after an inspiring win over New Mexico State, the Longhorns took a major step back in their 40-21 loss to Brigham Young University. Here are four things that stood out in Saturday night’s game: 

Ineffective run defense

The Texas defense relinquished 550 yards on the ground against BYU, setting a school record for most rushing yards allowed in a game.

The Longhorns struggled with poor tackling and runs up the middle, and the Cougars capitalized with an average of 7.6 yards per carry. Sophomore quarterback Taysom Hill took advantage with 259 yards and three touchdowns on the ground, the second highest rushing total for a quarterback in BYU history. 

Texas had trouble stopping the BYU zone read. This poses a significant problem moving forward, as many of the Longhorns’ upcoming opponents feature that system in their offensive playbooks.

Offensive-line woes

The veteran Texas offensive line had no answer for the Cougars’ front seven, as David Ash and the running backs battled pressure in the backfield throughout the game.

BYU racked up four sacks, five quarterback hits and eight tackles-for-loss while limiting the Longhorns’ run game to just 3.4 yards per carry. At the forefront of this was senior All-American linebacker Kyle Van Noy, who lit up the Longhorns with eight tackles, one sack and four quarterback hits in the game.

The Cougars’ ferocious pass rush broke through the Texas line with relative ease, and Ash rarely found time to locate his receivers. The junior quarterback failed to get comfortable in the pocket all night, and he took more hits than usual because of poor protection.

Wide receivers impress

Despite the ineffectiveness of the running game, the Longhorns’ starting wide receivers each provided strong performances.

Senior wide receiver Mike Davis built on an impressive Week 1 with eight catches for 114 yards and two touchdowns against BYU. Much of his yardage came on a 57-yard bomb down the left sideline for his first score of the night.

Junior wide receiver Jaxon Shipley recorded a big game as well, working the underneath game to haul in eight passes for 105 yards. In addition, sophomore wide receiver Kendall Sanders showed promise in his first game of the season with four catches for 36 yards.

Another slow start on offense

After failing to score on their first five possessions last week, the Longhorn offense was stagnant to start the game against the Cougars.

On its first three drives, the Texas offense managed just 23 yards and went three-and-out on each possession. The Longhorns woke up on their fourth drive with a touchdown strike from Ash to Davis, but they were forced to punt for a fourth time in their fifth possession of the first quarter.