Stubborn inflation, weak lending weigh on eurozone

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FRANKFURT, Germany — Europe got more downbeat economic news Monday as inflation remained higher than expected and European Central Bank data showed only anemic growth in credit to businesses — despite its massive infusion of cheap money into the financial system.

Inflation in the 17 countries that use the euro fell to an annual 2.6 percent in April, down from 2.7 percent in March but higher than the 2.5 percent expected by market analysts.

Rising prices have been a consistent headache for the ECB — the chief monetary authority for the 17-country eurozone. The annual rate has remained stuck well above the central bank’s goal of just under 2 percent, a target that it now says won’t be reached until early 2013.

The stubborn inflation rate — which the ECB blames on higher oil prices and taxes in some countries — is important to the eurozone debt crisis because it discourages the ECB from cutting its 1 percent benchmark interest rate further. Lower central bank interest rates can spur growth, but can also worsen inflation. ECB President Mario Draghi has stressed that fighting price rises is the bank’s top priority.

Printed on Tuesday, May 1st. 2012 as: Inflation remains great barrier to fixing Europe's debt situation