Texas Student Television

Student editors read over page proofs before the Texan is sent to the printers. Students maintain complete editorial control over the content that appears in the pages of the Texan.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Garza | Daily Texan Staff

Texas Student Media has a bright future ahead.

I couldn’t necessarily have said the same had you asked me when I started at The Daily Texan in the summer of 2012. At the time, I was just a lowly entry-level staffer who wasn’t privy to key discussions on the budget. That said, I knew people were nervous about our financial future.

By a college student’s standards, the problems weren’t of a particularly recent vintage. After all, like nearly every other newspaper in this country, we had taken an enormous hit after the recession set in in 2008 and print advertising revenue, still the greatest source of most newspapers’ money, began to plummet. 

The extent of our financial troubles didn’t really become apparent to me until the spring of 2013, when the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees, which sets the budget for the Texan, the Cactus yearbook, the KVRX radio station, Texas Student Television and the Travesty humor publication, met to discuss the possibility of decreasing our print schedule from five days a week to four.

It wasn’t a major change, but it would have taken the Daily out of The Daily Texan and forever changed its identity.

Many other college newspapers in recent years have swallowed the poison pill and completely altered their print schedules, in some cases going so far as to slash the print product altogether.

But the Texan staff, led by then-editor Susannah Jacob, and the paper’s alumni weren’t going to let us succumb to that fate. (To their credit, the alumni rallied together in large numbers, taking out a full-page ad in the Texan to express their opposition to the change and creating the Friends of the Texan alumni group, which has helped raised money to continue the Texan’s education and journalistic missions.)

So instead, the board agreed to a 50 percent cut in all student wages to stanch at least some of the bleeding.

The staff took that change on the chin, but an even bigger threat was on the horizon.

That next spring, the board considered something even more drastic: making The Daily Texan the weekly Texan.

The mere proposal was enough to cause jitters, and serious discussions were had within the newsroom about what such a change would spell for the future of our operations.

We beat back this threat thanks to the generosity of President William Powers Jr.’s office, which promised us several hundred thousand dollars of transitional funding for three years to bridge the crevasse between financial obscurity and financial light.

That funding, along with a $1 million endowment for TSM obtained by the Moody College of Communication, is already putting us on a firmer financial footing and will take much of the anxiety out of future student editors’ jobs.

The lifeline we’ve been thrown won’t keep us afloat forever, but it will at the very least keep us bobbing along long enough for the changes implemented by TSM’s new professional director and advertising manager to take effect.

I have about a month left as editor of the Texan. Many things remain uncertain, but our immediate financial future isn’t one of them.

Brands is a linguistics senior from Austin. He is editor-in-chief of The Daily Texan.

With the recent donation from talk show host Zach Anner, TSTV will be able to replace old equipment and begin broadcasting digitally.

Photo Credit: Thomas Allison | Daily Texan Staff

The future looks very bright for the entities at Texas Student Media. A year ago, I would have said the exact opposite. I would have said something like, “Repent! This ship is doomed! All of us will burn along with it!” Yet, a lot has changed in a year. 

When I took office as Texas Student TV’s Station Manager last June, there was no denying that TSM was in peril. We had just barely survived months of debate surrounding whether or not to cut some of The Daily Texan’s print schedule. We were running out of money in the reserves. The Texas Travesty was printing on terrible paper that covered your hands in ink if you held it for more than a minute. But then, some wonderful things happened. 

Gerald Johnson, our new TSM Director, walked in and immediately began listening to the concerns of the rest of the TSM staff, the student managers, and the University. Texas Student Media and its entities were officially moved under the Moody College of Communications. The University assured us that they would not let us go bankrupt.

I can’t list all of the incredible things that the media entities have accomplished this year. As a part of Texas Student TV and The Texas Travesty, I saw a surge in broadcast advertisements sold for TSTV (we usually only had a Domino’s ad as our sole commercial), I witnessed the Travesty’s page count and paper quality increase. TSTV got some needed equipment handed down from the Moody College (our master control soundboard from the 1970’s is officially replaced by one from this century). Hell, our new student government leaders are now Travesty boys (though that might not have so much to do with TSM).

Yet, there’s still a lot that can be done. TSTV’s old studio cameras that shoot in 480p need to be upgraded if we are to be competitive with other schools. There’s still the ever-present thirst for more equipment to keep up with the demand of more students in the organization. Advertising revenue could do to be higher. 

However, I feel very confident leaving this incredible organization in the hands it’s in now. There is nothing like Texas Student Media anywhere outside of this campus, and thanks to the seeds planted this year, that trend will continue for decades to come.

Stockwell is a radio-television-film senior from New Braunfels. He is currently the station manager of Texas Student Television. 

Editor’s Note: This year four candidates are running for three available voting seats on the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees, which oversees The Daily Texan, the Cactus yearbook, the Texas Travesty humor publication, Texas Student Television and the KVRX 91.7 FM radio station. Three candidates are running for the two at-large seats and one student for the one open Moody College of Communication seat. Candidates were asked shortly after their certification to write two 500-word columns. The second column focuses on a topic of the candidate’s choosing relating to their campaign. Candidates who participated wrote their own headlines. Only light typographical corrections were made. Among the at-large candidates, the top two vote-getters will be seated. Jan Ross Piedad, the Moody College of Communication candidate, has written a column that is running here. She agreed to forgo print space. For more information on the candidates, please visit our candidate database here.

I wish someone else were reading this. That’s not because I don’t like you, quite the opposite. I admire that you are here, but that’s just it, you’re already here.

You sought this piece out. You’re reading this because you care about the welfare of your campus. You see The Daily Texan as a valuable way to take the pulse of our little microcosm of the world. I don’t mean to say I don’t want you to read this but I wish someone who doesn’t usually look at the Texan gave it a chance today.

I wish that person would stumble on this paper for once, see the passion of the writers, feel the combination of journalistic talent and fresh perspectives, marvel at the quality at their fingertips, and — after all of that — find my little corner here. I want to talk to that person about what they saw in these pages and pixels. I want them to talk to me about the brilliance here already and the greatness that could be. 

The best version of this outlet, and our whole student media footprint at this university, is still out there. Between the storied tradition of each source and the progressive ideas out in the student body, the constant consumers and the part-time fans and the people who have never listened or read or watched. 

At their best, our student media presence is in dialogue with its history and future at once. KVRX throws an hour of Texas country against a show of video game scores and dares the listener to find a station-wide identity beyond that eclecticism. 

The Daily Texan was the leading voice for de-segregation of campus decades ago and a forum for the President of IFC and members of minority groups on campus to have a healthy conversation about their disconnect a week ago.  Our student-produced pages and airwaves should reflect our community as a whole. While we are doing a good job as it stands, we can never realize that goal unless more people join the conversation. 

The responsibility to seek that better version of our media presence falls to both consumers and management. Obviously editors and managers and producers understand their role, but the audience and the manager’s manager need to come to terms with their place in that process.  That’s where I can help.

If elected to the Texas Student Media Board, I want to work toward that understanding. The board needs to pursue the dueling goals of preserving these institutions and pushing them toward greatness. I want to be a part of that process. I want to take part in guiding these outlets into a creative renaissance while financially ensuring their welfare. 

In an ideal world, 50,000 or more people would be engaged with these media. I dream of a Texan media big tent with breadth of perspectives and consumption. At the same time, that size should not hinder us in pushing on to a better tomorrow.  I take back what I said, I’m glad you’re not someone else. I just wish you brought more friends. 

Proctor is an English and business honors senior from Nashville. He is running for an at-large seat on the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Editor's Note: Jan Ross Piedad, the Moody College of Communication candidate, has written the following column on a topic of the her choosing relating to her campaign. She agreed to forgo print space.

In a recent job interview, I was asked to describe myself in three words. At the time, it felt like a moment of cosmic karma. I had asked the same confusing, oddly personal query to my fellow colleagues about a year ago while working at the University Interscholastic League, featuring students assistants across all departments and backgrounds. Thoughtful expressions and a brainstorming session tended to follow, but I didn’t have the same luxury when put on the spot this time. Here’s where I eventually arrived: hardworking, flexible and visionary.

This season of campus-wide elections, I am on the ballot to represent the Moody College of Communication on the Texas Student Media Board of Operation Trustees and it is my heartfelt belief that the same qualities will embolden success for the position. As a third-year journalism major, student life isn’t just about assessments and the next student organization meeting, there’s stories and group projects too. It’s a personal truth that I work much harder and better when the effort is for a group, when the product is a direct reflection of more than just me.

Whether it stands for three people, five TSM properties, all of the University and beyond, I will commit to benefit the many. My flexibility in what I am able to do as a multimedia journalist, as well what I am willing to do as a leader, are assets to the responsibility of representing the diverse departments of the Moody College. Visionary is less of a prophecy but more of a purpose. Last summer, I was the sole student representing the University at the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change, a three week seminar with students, professors and media professionals belonging to all parts of the world. From the experience, I grew to appreciate the gift of education and an understanding for media literacy: the practice of analyzing, evaluating and creating messages through an assortment of mediums for a critical and culturally competent outcome. Media literacy is lifelong discipline and I believe the practice is where the future of these media entities can be.

My greatest connections to TSM are my two semesters on The Daily Texan editorial staff and three years volunteering for Texas Student Television. Now working primarily on social media for Good Morning Texas, I see the potential we have to connect as a community. There’s a need to recognize that yes, we do have a radio station, TV studio and satirical publication working right here on campus. And you can join as well. Promotional efforts are one a few things I will work to address during my term, along with greater interconnectedness between the five entities and appeals for updated equipment. Because yes, I work with those cameras, soundboards and computers too.

Service is at the center of my values and it is my deepest hope that I could be of help to a greater cause. In the past few years, I have been involved with a variety non-profit organizations for a range of purposes, from college scholarships to child advocacy to hosting globally-focused events. One similarity between all these efforts is effective communication, and everyone needs a little more of that in our lives. The special thing about TSM properties is the long-standing tradition of student expression across print, radio and television, documenting the UT Austin community daily. It is important to uphold this legacy to create a more inclusive, creative campus through TSM properties: The Texas Travesty, Cactus Yearbook, KVRX, Texas Student Television, and The Daily Texan.

Editor’s Note: This year four candidates are running for three available voting seats on the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees, which oversees The Daily Texan, the Cactus yearbook, the Texas Travesty humor publication, Texas Student Television and the KVRX 91.7 FM radio station. Three candidates are running for the two at-large seats and one student for the one open Moody College of Communication seat. Candidates were asked shortly after their certification to write two 500-word columns, the first on the following question: In recent years, the student board members have been accused of not investing enough effort in their positions. If elected, what would you do to play a more active role in TSM’s affairs, and what changes would you try to enact? Candidates who participated in this first round wrote their own headlines. Only light typographical corrections were made. Among the at-large candidates, the top two vote-getters will be seated. For more information on the candidates, please visit our candidate database here.

Think of your time you’ve spent at The University of Texas thus far. What are you most proud of?

It's a hard question — but vital. In the words of British entrepreneur and investor Richard Branson: "Above all, you want to create something you’re proud of.” 

That philosophy couldn't be truer at The Daily Texan. Since I began working at the paper freshman year, I've seen countless students working to create comics, articles and pages that they're proud of — ones they share with their peers, educating them about campus and city-wide issues. I, for one, am proud of this dedication I see at the paper. I am proud not only of the individual effort of my coworkers, but also of the obstacles that the Texan and its peer TSM publications have faced as a whole — from the small day-to-day task of finding content and reporting news to the more encompassing challenge of managing a budget shortfall in the decline of print media. 

I have worked at the Texan since my freshman year. First, I worked as a columnist. Then I served as an associate editor on the editorial board. And, this year, I have my own biweekly page as Forum editor. So, thinking back to my time at UT thus far, I am most proud of my work at the Texan, and from this pride comes a sense responsibility. I feel responsible not only for the content I create at the Texan, but also for ensuring that the paper, and other TSM publications, can endure in the years to come.

The TSM board is in charge of just that. As a board, TSM works to determine the character of all the student media publications, by supervising the student managers and setting a budget for all the TSM publications. Though most of this administrative work happens behind the scenes, it’s an essential part of the publication process — one that I feel I could contribute to well thanks to my experience working at the paper.  

One of the shortcomings of past at-large members has been a lack of involvement in TSM. What starts as missing a board meeting to study for an upcoming test can quickly turn into habitually skipping out on at-large obligations. Though I cannot speak for previous at-large members of the board, I can say that I will not skirt my obligations. Why? Because thanks to my experience working at the paper, I have firsthand knowledge of how important it is for a student voice on the board. So, I will be sure to attend all meetings so that I can best communicate student interests to the other TSM board members. The drive that's needed to publish a paper — the motivation my peers at the Texan have taught me — would accompany me as a member of the TSM board.

So come this March — when you're filling out your ballot for at-large members — vote for someone who feels a sense of duty to the TSM publications, someone who has worked on the other side. Vote Amil Malik for TSM board at-large. 

Malik is a Plan II, business honors and finance senior from Austin. She is running for an at-large seat on the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees. Follow Malik on Twitter @amil_malik94.

Editor’s Note: This year four candidates are running for three available voting seats on the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees, which oversees The Daily Texan, the Cactus yearbook, the Texas Travesty humor publication, Texas Student Television and the KVRX 91.7 FM radio station. Three candidates are running for the two at-large seats and one student for the one open Moody College of Communication seat. Candidates were asked shortly after their certification to write two 500-word columns, the first on the following question: In recent years, the student board members have been accused of not investing enough effort in their positions. If elected, what would you do to play a more active role in TSM’s affairs, and what changes would you try to enact? Candidates who participated in this first round wrote their own headlines. Only light typographical corrections were made. Among the at-large candidates, the top two vote-getters will be seated. For more information on the candidates, please visit our candidate database here.

My name is McKay Proctor. I was born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee.  I miss 91.1 WRVU. 

Throughout my childhood, Vanderbilt’s student-run radio station was an island of progressive taste in a sea of country. Sure, there were some Gregorian chants and Nicaraguan folk songs mixed in, but 91.1 WRVU was my window on the musical world. 

The summer of 2011, 91.1 WRVU died. Vanderbilt Student Communications sold the station’s broadcast license, upending the community of students, DJ’s and listeners that loved it. Losing WRVU felt like losing a friend. I’ll never forget it.

My dedication to the Texas Student Media Board comes from losing a piece of student-run media before I was even a student. I know how delicate, how precious these outlets are. When I begin my day with the Texan or listen to KVRX in my car, I remember the last time I heard WRVU. 

None of these outlets are guaranteed to stick around forever. We must defend them through consumption. We must treat them as the valuable pieces of student culture that they are. I want to take that attitude to the Texas Student Media Board to formalize my relationship with these wonderful cultural institutions on our campus. I will mirror the increase in responsibility with an upshot in accountability. 

As a member of the TSM Board, I would have a direct role in the direction of critical parts of our student culture. I could never take that responsibility lightly, but even less so when I felt the sting of mismanagement when 91.1 WRVU disappeared. We must appreciate them every moment we’re exposed to them, not just for their content, but for their very existence. We as a student body should feel blessed that these publications exist. If the board appointed to manage these outlets fails to appreciate that, can they expect consumers to do the same? 

As a member of the Board I would strive to change its reputation for under-achievement. Board members should be as engaged in their part of the process as the editors, staff writers, and DJs of the outlets are in theirs. 

I also wish to raise the profile of our media outlets to the level they deserve. KVRX is a phenomenal community-run radio station. The Daily Texan is a nationally regarded student publication. TSTV stands alone as a student-run FCC-listed television stations. The Cactus has been a part of student life since the days of old B-Hall. The Travesty is flat-out hilarious. Students need to know that, in part so distribution can reflect it, but also because they’ll attract students from a broader spectrum of campus to participate. Those people can then hold the TSM Board more accountable – a virtuous cycle where all flows from holding these publications in proper regard. 

I hope when you think about the kind of candidate I am and the sort of board member I will be, you see me tuning in to 91.1 on my radio dial in Nashville, and hearing the world through those airwaves. I felt the same amazement at those broad sonic horizons then that I do at the varied spectrum of Texas Student Media outlets now.  My name is McKay Proctor. I live in Austin, Texas. I love KVRX.

Proctor is an English and business honors senior from Nashville. He is running for an at-large seat on the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Almost a full week after news broke that Texas Student Media, commonly known as TSM, would move under the domain of the Moody College of Communication, it remains unclear who — if anybody — ultimately made that decision.

In an interview with the Texan on Friday, President William Powers Jr. said he did not make the final decision on the move, although he considered the absorption of TSM properties — which include the Texan, Texas Student Television, Cactus Yearbook, KVRX 91.7 and Texas Travesty — a plausible solution for TSM’s financial woes.

Gage Paine, the vice president for student affairs, and Roderick Hart, dean of the Moody College of Communication, denied making the final decision to move the properties earlier in the week, though they acknowledged they played roles in the process.

Last week, the Texan reported that TSM properties, including The Daily Texan, would be moved into the domain of Moody college from their current home in the Division of Student Affairs. Powers said he was comfortable with the move, though it wasn’t originally his idea.

“I don’t have a dog in the hunt of how the issue is [resolved], of how progress is made,” Powers said. “Gage had an idea it would help to have, from the University’s point of view, some structural change — journalism, rather than Student Affairs. My view was that [the move] was a plausible solution — if it works, it’s fine with me.”

Powers said the extent of his personal involvement was helping to facilitate discussion with Hart.

“I don’t think he went out looking for it, but [Hart] was a good soldier, and he said ‘Yes, if that would help, I’ll do this,’” Powers said. “I did a little bit of legwork for [Paine] — that was my role.”

In an interview Thursday, Paine said she recommended to Powers that TSM properties should be moved, but that she did not make the final decision.

“[In a regular meeting with the president], I said I think it’s in the best interest of TSM to move — that would be my recommendation at this point,” Paine said. “Ultimately, the administrative home [of TSM properties] is a presidential decision, in consultation with all of the administrative units. It’s his decision; it wasn’t a vote.”

Paine could not be reached for additional comment or clarification after the Texan interviewed Powers on Friday afternoon.

Powers also said he was surprised TSM board members were not alerted to, or included more fully in, the decision-making process.

“I would have anticipated they would’ve been part of the process,” Powers said. “I don’t know all the legal ins and outs of it, but I would have anticipated it would’ve taken some action by the board.”

Dave Player, the president of the TSM board, said he was not surprised the board was not consulted beyond a visit by Paine and Hart at a meeting in September. 

“I can understand why the board was an afterthought because we’ve been completely cut out of the decision-making processes,” Player said. “The way the administration has applied and interpreted the trust in past years has made the board toothless — we’ve been turned into a powerless entity.”

The student Declaration of Trust is a document created in 1971, when TSM — then called Texas Student Publications — was trying to ensure editorial independence, while locked in a legal battle with the UT System Board of Regents. The Trust made the organization an independent entity, although its assets and certain staff positions were still to be controlled by the regents.

Powers said he had many questions he had assumed someone would answer before the move was made.

“I mentioned, we’ve got the trust — I have no idea,” Powers said. “Does the trust need to be changed? Do the regents need to get involved in changing the Trust? I would have anticipated that all of that would have been worked out in advance.”

In a letter announcing the decision to the Division of Student Affairs written last week, Paine said details about the move would be settled in the coming weeks.

“We look forward to working with Dean Hart on a smooth, thoughtful and deliberate transition of leadership and TSM resources,” Paine wrote in her letter.

Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated the original name of the entity that oversees The Daily Texan and other student media properties. The entity's former name is Texas Student Publications.

Texas Student Television members can officially say they are the best college television media in Texas. 

The Texas Intercollegiate Press Association conferred Sweepstakes upon TSTV Wednesday; the station received the most points out of more than 50 Texas colleges for its entries into the association’s annual television competition. Categories in which the UT was ranked first include best sportscast as well as best news feature and nonfeature story. Among several other awards, TSTV was also recognized with Best Newscast and Best Sportscast, which they were awarded for earlier this month. 

Kaleigh Schneider, TSTV news director and broadcast journalism senior, said Sweepstakes is the sole highest and most prestigious award the press association gives out each year. 

“I could not be more proud of TSTV for winning Sweepstakes,” Schneider said. “It’s awesome to be recognized for all of the hard work everyone constantly contributes.”

Natalie Hee, TSTV news anchor and broadcast journalism senior, said in her time at the station she has seen a major upgrade in their operating equipment as well as an increased marketing focus. Hee said the station is working harder to promote their image across campus via merchandise, social media and cross promoting for other Texas Student Media branches. 

Hee said said winning Sweepstakes was a great way to end her career at TSTV.

“It’s very ideal; it’s really nice to go out with a bang,” she said. “I’ve always had very high hopes and big ambitions for TSTV.”

Overseeing TSTV’s functions is Station Manger Becca Rushworth, a radio-television-film senior. Rushworth said her station has not won Sweepstakes since 2005, but that this year they placed first with 60 points, beating their closest competitor Texas Christian University by six points. 

“What is most outstanding to me is that we submitted about 16 entries among 9 categories and didn’t place in only two categories,” Rushworth said. “It’s comforting to look at those numbers in terms of winning percentage.”

Rushworth said TSTV has given her a passion for television production, as well as important real world experiences.  She said each production requires strong teamwork in planning, producing and executing, and that their products can give students something to be proud about. 

“With the Daily Texan’s award and TSTV’s Sweepstakes, students’ fellow longhorns are achieving great things with the resources and gems of the University,” Rushworth said. “It’s important to know that education doesn’t stop at the classroom.”

RTF sophomore Luke Swinney works in the TSTV control room as they kickoff 24Seven on Sunday evening. The fundraising event will run for 168 consecutive hours, pulling in nearly 200 volunteers as well as airing online and on television.

Photo Credit: Sam Ortega | Daily Texan Staff

Nearly 200 volunteers at Texas Student Television plan to go beyond the standard 40-hour work week to produce 168 consecutive hours of live content for an annual broadcast and fundraising event.

24Seven started Sunday at 7 p.m. in the Unofficial Zach Anner Studio. For an entire week, TSTV will place continual live content on air that includes programming such as a cereal show, girl talk, the Newlywed Show, student organization shows including Student Body President Thor Lund and Vice President Wills Brown and a late night talk show, as well as regularly scheduled shows like KVR News and Videogame Hour Live.

Rebecca Rushworth, station manager and Radio-Television-Film senior, said 24Seven and all programming on TSTV is the culmination of hard-working individuals who volunteer their time and effort to help produce shows all while going to class and learning at UT.

“The purpose of the event is to show that our volunteers are working hard to maintain the standard of being the only Federal Communications Commission licensed entirely student-run station in the country,” Rushworth said. “Part of being entirely student run is that we support ourselves along with some very appreciated support from the Student Services Budget Committee.”

24Seven raised approximately $1,500 last year, Rushworthsaid . She said the event began in 2008 as a fundraiser to purchase the station’s digital antenna but did not become an annual event until Spring 2012. 

In his second year as a volunteer for 24Seven, journalism junior and TSTV assistant news director Jon Scott said producing 168 hours of consecutive live content can get pretty crazy.

“We have people at the station all the time,” Scott said. “We have to. People sleep at the station. Someone has to be on camera at all times.”

Scott said he will spend around 20 hours on air throughout 24Seven, but not consecutively.

“Last year, I actually had to register for fall classes on camera at 8 a.m.,” Scott said.

Journalism senior and TSTV sports director Alexandra Stockwell said she enjoys the challenge.

“Some of the best content happens last minute at 3 a.m. so it’s one of those things that’s so much fun even though it’s technically work,” Stockwell said.

Content from 24 Seven will air all day online and on television — on digital antenna channel 29.1 and in dorms and Apogee on channel 15. Content will also air Monday through Friday from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Channel Austin for service providers Time Warner and AT&T U-verse.

Rushworth said she hopes to raise nearly $3,000 this year and establish a relationship with businesses and student organizations.

Published on March 25, 2013 as "TSTV hosts annual 24Seven fundrasing event". 

Gage Paine, vice president of Student Affairs, announced Thursday that Jalah Goette will serve as the director of the Texas Student Media board.

The Texas Student Media board represents the various University student media outlets, including The Daily Texan, Texas Student Television, KVRX, the Texas Travesty and the Cactus Yearbook. Previously, UT was prepared to go through a national search for a new director, but after a recommendation from the Texas Student Media board, Paine decided to appoint Goette to the position.

“While this is not the methodology that we typically use to fill a director-level position, I recognize that Texas Student Media has had considerable leadership transition challenges over the last few years,” Paine said in a memorandum to the board.

Goette has served as the interim director since the spring, when Gary Borders, the former Texas Student Media board director, resigned. Borders said his resignation was forced by Juan Gonzalez, former vice president of Student Affairs, because Borders proposed the selling of KVRX and Texas Student Television.

Goette has been with Texas Student Media for six years. Previously, she was the assistant director, where she dealt with Texas Student Media business and advertising.

Printed on Friday, November 9, 2012 as: Texas Student Media board appoints interim director to permanent position