Montreal

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-73.555

A police officer looks towards a black vehicle that has had its contents removed at a crime scene outside the Metropolis in Montreal on Wednesday.

Photo Credit: The Associated Press

MONTREAL (AP) — Police interrogated a man accused of opening fire at a midnight victory rally for Quebec’s new separatist premier, but they said the suspect’s rambling statements in French and English offered no immediate motive for the shooting that killed one man and wounded another.

A police official Wednesday identified the suspect as Richard Henry Bain, 62, from La Conception, Quebec. The police official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the suspect had not been charged.

Police said Bain will likely appear in court Thursday morning. Meanwhile, people who know Bain, the owner of a hunting and fishing resort, recalled his complaints about bureaucracy but could think of no political grievances he held.

Quebec provincial police said the masked gunman wearing a bathrobe opened fire just outside the building where Pauline Marois of the separatist Parti Quebecois was giving her victory speech.

The gunman was heard shouting “The English are waking up!” in French as police dragged him away.

Marois was whisked off the stage by guards and was not injured. She later called the shooting an isolated event and said it was probably a case of a person who has “serious health issues.”

“I am deeply affected by this, but I have to go forward and assume my responsibilities,” Quebec’s first female premier said Wednesday, calling Quebec a non-violent society. “An act of folly cannot rid us of this reality.”

The attack shocked Canadians who are not used to such violence at political events and have long worried that gun violence more often seen in the U.S. could become more common in their country.

Police said a 48-year-old man was pronounced dead at the scene and a 27-year-old man was wounded but would survive. A third man was treated for shock. Police didn’t identify the victims, but they worked at production company Productions du Grand Bambou Inc, a person answering the phone at the Montreal company confirmed.

Printed on Thursday, September 6th, 2012 as: Marois' victory rally marred by shooting

(Courtesy of 4AD)

Purity Ring, a new electronic band hailing from the indie hotspot of Montreal, is a methodical monster that has discovered the perfect balance between human and machine elements. The group consists of Megan James on vocals and Corin Roddick on everything electronic. Their sound is dominated by neither, but rather by their tangible chemistry.

Its organic nature stems from the visceral imagery crafted by James. At first, her voice can be wrongfully dismissed as yet another dreamy synth-pop falsetto which merely provides ambiance or a hook, but after a few tracks one begins to notice her stark images and the intimate world in which they exist. In “Fineshrine” she sings, “Get a little closer let it fold/ Cut open my sternum and pull/ My little ribs around you,” a savage yet endearing lyric. Her tone is euphonic, but her message is often brutal. When she sings of drilling holes in her eyelids to see her lover as she sleeps or sticking toothpicks in her dirt-filled heart, it sounds more romantic than horrific.

These lyrics combine well with Roddick’s pulsating beats. Almost all of the songs are laden with side-chaining, a rhythmic volume swell applied to the bass. This makes the music heave with life, and this living, breathing quality suits James’ gut lyrics. Beyond the bass, Roddick’s compositions are meticulously built on layers of complexities: Opposing stop-start rhythms keep the listener off balance and during the instrumental breaks, Roddick erases the line between his machines and James’ voice by affecting it digitally, seamlessly blending them with synthesizers.

Due to his relentless usage of side-chaining, many of the songs sound fairly similar, but this is a positive. Purity Ring’s sonic appeal comes from the subtleties that define each song. It’s as if each song is motivated by the same dogma, only that each track approaches this same end with a unique means.

Purity Ring is an invigorating new electronic band because of their ability to manipulate popular musical elements for their unadulterated self-exhibition, one that embraces electronics and takes their music away from cold, robotic womps back to what music is truly about — human expression and emotion.

(Photo courtesy of Deerhoof).

It would not be an overstatement to say that band names that begin with the word “deer” have their own special place in the rock music spectrum. Avant-garde, anything-goes rock band Deerhoof holds their own in the special deers-only section that includes Deerhunter and Deer Tick; it’s a strange blend of distortion, frenetic drums and lead singer Satomi Matsuzaki’s child-like delivery that separates them from other deer-friendly groups.

Deerhoof’s 18-year career can be summed up in two parts: distance and experimentation. The members, who all used to live in the San Francisco Bay Area, have since relocated to different places. It’s proof of the band’s long-lasting chemistry that in between all of the joyous calamity, you can sense the group’s reliance on one another. They mesh their own world into each other’s to create a universe that, upon first listen, you can’t help but be hooked.

Guitarist John Dieterich spoke with The Daily Texan about the distance between members, influences and future plans.

The Daily Texan: You guys will be coming through for South By Southwest, and then doing a tour with Of Montreal and Kishi Bashi. How does it feel to be back on the road?
John Dieterich: It feels good. It’s always slightly nerve-racking when we haven’t played for a while. But we’re going to have a few days to work on things here in Albuquerque. We’re in the process of working on a new album, so a lot of our energy is focused on that. It’ll just be good to make noise in a room together again.

DT: Do you feel that not having played with one another for a while and the distance between everybody makes the songwriting process more challenging?
JD: To be honest, it’s always difficult for us, getting together and working out the music. The part that is the hardest is that it’s more of a challenge to get in the same room. We never know if — when we get back together — if we’re going to know how to play. After a couple days I’m like, ‘Oh, what was I worried about?’ but there’s always this fear that we can no longer play our songs.

DT: You guys have opened up for an assortment of bands including The Roots, Bloc Party and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. How is it looking back and seeing your music has struck a nerve with these groups from different genres?
JD: It’s always very humbling. It’s always a surprise when I hear that someone has listened to our music. It’s just a shock that what we try to communicate is heard by, and even reinterpreted by others. Music is the philosophy through which I see the world, and it’s great to be a part of that musical conversation.

DT: Are there any bands you hope to catch while you’re here and any fond memories of performing in Austin?
JD: We’ve played SXSW a couple of times. This’ll be our first time in several years playing several shows. Usually for past SXSWs we’ve just done like one show. I have no idea of what is happening yet, but I know we’ll be able to see some other bands. We’re going to be running around like crazy. As for a memorable moment in Austin, we actually played with a local group called The Weird Weeds. They’re good friends of ours, and if we get the opportunity to see them, that’d be very exciting.

DT: What’s next for you guys after SXSW? I know you already mentioned recording.
JD: We’re in the midst of [recording]. We’ve been writing all separate from each other, so some of what we’re working on will be what we end up recording. Basically we’re going to do the tour with Of Montreal, and then we’re going to have several days in Portland where we’re just recording over there.

Austin Aztex

The Austin Aztex played its final game of the season Saturday for a 3-2 loss at the hands of the Montreal Impact. Though the loss eliminated Austin from the playoffs in a 5-2 aggregate series, the night wasn’t a total loss for the Aztex.

In just its second year in existence, the team managed to land the third seed in the USSF D-2 Pro League playoffs after being in the first position for much of the season. The Aztex went neck and neck with the Canadian squad that has a significantly larger roster and payroll and will be joining Major League Soccer in a couple of years.

Montreal scored early goals in both halves and the third just before stoppage time to extinguish any chances of an Aztex comeback. However, it’s not as if Austin rolled over and allowed the Impact to walk away with a victory. The Aztex controlled much of the game and had several opportunities to take control of it.

“We had enough chances tonight to win two games,” head coach Adrian Heath said. “On any given day, the outcome could’ve been different.”

Austin ended up with more shots and corner attempts and was the more physical of the two teams, but in the end, they weren’t able to beat out the experience that Montreal, a club
started in 1993, had put on the field.

“That is a huge club,” Heath said of the size and experience that Montreal had coming into the playoff game on Saturday.

The Impact will also enter MLS in a couple of years as the league expands. Compared to the two years that the Austin Aztex have been playing, there is a tailor-made excuse for how the game went. But the players weren’t buying it.

“We have no excuses. We gave ourselves too much to do,” forward Eddie Johnson said about letting in two early goals in each half that put Austin in a bind, especially considering that it needed to win by three to advance on the aggregate goal total.

Now the Aztex will go into offseason with a chip on their shoulder and with something to build off of.

“Nobody expected us to do as well. We can be proud of that,” forward Jamie Watson said of his team’s advancement throughout the year.

Even Heath was pleasantly surprised with the team’s overall success this year, despite the end result.

“We made huge strides this year,” said Heath, who will have the players’ full focus heading into what should be a difficult offseason.

The players aren’t going to be sitting back and riding the accomplishments of this year into next season. They intend to get better and work to go even further then they did this year as
they try to bring a championship to Austin. 

The Austin Aztex played its final game of the season Saturday for a 3-2 loss at the hands of the Montreal Impact. Though the loss eliminated Austin from the playoffs in a 5-2 aggregate series, the night wasn’t a total loss for the Aztex.

In just its second year in existence, the team managed to land the third seed in the USSF D-2 Pro League playoffs after being in the first position for much of the season. The Aztex went neck and neck with the Canadian squad that has a significantly larger roster and payroll and will be joining Major League Soccer in a couple of years.

Montreal scored early goals in both halves and the third just before stoppage time to extinguish any chances of an Aztex comeback. However, it’s not as if Austin rolled over and allowed the Impact to walk away with a victory. The Aztex controlled much of the game and had several opportunities to take control of it.

“We had enough chances tonight to win two games,” head coach Adrian Heath said. “On any given day, the outcome could’ve been different.”

Austin ended up with more shots and corner attempts and was the more physical of the two teams, but in the end, they weren’t able to beat out the experience that Montreal, a club
started in 1993, had put on the field.

“That is a huge club,” Heath said of the size and experience that Montreal had coming into the playoff game on Saturday.

The Impact will also enter MLS in a couple of years as the league expands. Compared to the two years that the Austin Aztex have been playing, there is a tailor-made excuse for how the game went. But the players weren’t buying it.

“We have no excuses. We gave ourselves too much to do,” forward Eddie Johnson said about letting in two early goals in each half that put Austin in a bind, especially considering that it needed to win by three to advance on the aggregate goal total.

Now the Aztex will go into offseason with a chip on their shoulder and with something to build off of.

“Nobody expected us to do as well. We can be proud of that,” forward Jamie Watson said of his team’s advancement throughout the year.

Even Heath was pleasantly surprised with the team’s overall success this year, despite the end result.

“We made huge strides this year,” said Heath, who will have the players’ full focus heading into what should be a difficult offseason.

The players aren’t going to be sitting back and riding the accomplishments of this year into next season. They intend to get better and work to go even further then they did this year as
they try to bring a championship to Austin.