London

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Photo Credit: Jessica Lin | Daily Texan Staff

During the last 18 months I have participated in intensive discussions with policymakers, scholars and students in London, Melbourne, Munich, Abu Dhabi, Toronto, Tokyo and countless American cities, especially Austin. (Austin is, perhaps, the most exotic place on this list.) Other than the consternation this “jet-setting” has elicited from my wife, these trips highlight for me two outstanding characteristics of our current world.

First, the spread of higher education and knowledge economies is creating a wide, diverse and deeply connected cohort of international elites. It is not just that smart and powerful people in all of these places communicate comfortably in English, but that they all use the same vocabulary, as they never have before. The global elites recognize the same educational credentials (from a small number of prestigious institutions), they measure wealth in similar ways (in dollars accumulated and consumed) and they identify common lifestyles (urban, secular and highly mobile.) Simply stated, global elites build productive working relationships across cultural boundaries because they attended the same schools, spend money in the same ways and travel frequently through the same airports. They are somewhat interchangeable as they sit next to one another in meetings, seminars and airline lounges, reading the same online news sources and following the same international financial and geopolitical issues. They know the up-to-date numbers for the major stock markets and they closely analyze various crises around China, Russia and Iran. They know more about these topics than many developments within their own societies.

Second, the global elites that I describe are large in number and diverse in background, but they are a distinct and segregated minority. They are educated cosmopolitans in societies, including the United States, that remain local in their common points of reference and limited in their educational horizons. The average German, Japanese or Canadian citizen does not attend a prestigious university, access large wealth resources or move from city to city. Most “ordinary” people live close to where they were born, work with individuals like themselves and distrust those who look and sound different. Most people care little about stock markets or international crises; they focus, as they always have, on their immediate surroundings and their personal needs.

Local citizens are, of course, dependent on international markets and geopolitical decisions that determine food and energy costs, as well as overall security and prosperity. Few people, however, think that way. If anything, the growing complexity of the world motivates disoriented individuals to crave the simplicity of the local experiences they can readily understand. Control for citizens who do not have the opportunities of global elites means localizing debates about taxation, security and social welfare. In a global age, politics are intensely local.

Online communications have, curiously, contributed to localization. No longer do elites dominate the flow of news and opinion. Now citizens from diverse locales can share their stories, their hopes and their grievances. Across societies, they inspire one another to stand up against elitism and reaffirm “true” and “authentic” local life choices. That discourse dominates many segments on social media. Those threatened by globalization are themselves global in their local expressions.

These observations are not intended to condemn local thinkers or defend global elites, but to explain that this divide is a major contributor to partisanship, incivility and stalemate in so many societies today. Global elites are more connected, powerful and self-confident than ever before, but local thinkers are increasingly mobilized, resentful and resistant. This explains the simultaneous growth of elite multiculturalism and local ethnocentrism as well as elite materialism and local religious devotion. Drivers of BMWs stuffed with organic groceries share the road with drivers of pickup trucks carrying guns and bibles, but they are pursuing very different destinations.

Arguments about party and ideology are really covers for the sociological divergences that are pulling knowledge professionals apart from less privileged hard-working men and women. The challenge of our time is to break out of our bubbles, recognize this division and do something about it. Traveling abroad to find other people like ourselves is not a solution, nor is clinging to a nostalgic image of a simpler local society from the past. Our problem is sociological because most of what we do on campus, at work, at home and on the Internet reinforces our separation from those whose lives are almost incomprehensibly different.

Perhaps we can begin to think about new bridges between the global and the local. These bridges must be personal, and they must show respect for differences in experiences. They must involve a self-conscious effort to move beyond one’s comfort zone.

Those of us who are a part of the global elite — and that includes most people on campus — have an obligation to reach out. We should not diminish our global goals, but we must anchor ourselves better in the local communities we often ignore. From London and Munich to Tokyo and Austin, elites must get out of their offices and walk the streets. This applies to students who need to take their learning outside the classroom and outside the campus.

Suri is a professor in the LBJ School of Public Affairs and the Department of History. Follow Suri on Twitter @JeremiSuri.

Former Texas track star Leo Manzano overcame setbacks to get back on track for a 2016 Olympic games appearance.

Leo Manzano had never even run eight miles before the Texas track and field team recruited him in 2004. 

“He hadn’t had the conditioning program that he was going to have at the University, lets put it that way,” said Bubba Thornton, former Longhorn track and field head coach. “[Former distance coach Jason Vigilante] had said we knew that Leo was going to be really good. We weren’t for sure that he was going to be great.” 

But eight years and four NCAA championships later, Manzano stood upon an Olympic podium in London clad in a silver medal after a closing surge in the 1500-meter final. 

“He’s not a quitter,” Manzano’s coach John Hayes said. “That helped him get that silver medal. He could have easily quit in that race.”

Manzano, who graduated from Texas in 2008 with Spanish and Portuguese degrees and a minor in business, ended the summer of 2012 by medaling in the most important race of his career. But just a few months later, his future was thrown into jeopardy.

Manzano was unable to renegotiate his contract and lost his running sponsorship with Nike in November 2012. He was left scrambling to find the resources necessary to travel to races and hire an Olympic-caliber trainer. 

“There was a lot of self-doubt [and] a feeling of inadequacy just because you know that you’ve accomplished one of the most important highlights of your career, winning a medal for the U.S.,” Manzano said. “It was very difficult.”

The “never quit” attitude Hayes saw in London kept Manzano on the track for a year and a half without a sponsor. 

Manzano’s business minor paid handsome dividends in his quest to return to the top of this sport. 

After almost a year without a sponsor, Manzano used T-shirt sales to fund his training and balanced business administration with the task of maintaining Olympic-level fitness.

Finally, in April 2014, sponsorships from French shoe company Hoka One One and watch company Timex brought stability to his career.

Manzano now views his rough year as a period of growth.

“It was an experience that I wouldn’t change for the world,” Manzano said. “I really do think that it made me stronger as a person.”

The new sponsorships also brought new challenges, however. 

Now, Manzano has to balance attending sponsorship events, working as a celebrity ambassador for the Marathon Kids charity and even attending movie premieres on top of the huge time commitment and rigorous training regiment being a top-flight Olympian requires.

“There’s a lot more that comes with being a silver medalist,” Manzano said. “I am very fortunate and always very grateful that I was able to accomplish that, but there has been a lot more work that has come with it as well.”

With new sponsorships in hand and a new coach, Manzano has his sights set on the Olympics — this time the 2016 games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

“That’s my next goal,” Manzano said. “I studied Portuguese at the University of Texas, so I’m hoping to use it wisely if all goes well and I make it to Rio.”

Welcome to Austin — the live music capitol — home to more hipsters than real people and chock-full of natives who know of music you won’t find on the top-40 countdown. Below is a list of song suggestions of music to listen to based on other popular songs:

If you like “99 Problems” by Jay-Z, then try listening to “99 Problems” by Hugo.

This is the type of song you’d listen to as you jump a shark tank on your motorcycle. Jay-Z’s rap version is very different from Hugo’s fusion of folk, rock and R&B. With a banjo playing the melody, this song has some twang, but it is very far from popular country music on the radio. If you’re looking for something that pushes genre boundaries, this is definitely something to check out. Maybe Beyoncé should reconsider her choice of a man here. 

“99 Problems” — Jay-Z

“99 Problems” — Hugo

 

If you like “GDFR” by Flo Rida, check out “Big Spender” by Theophilus London featuring A$AP Rocky.

Do you like to party? Of course you do. This song is great for going hard and throwing down — whether you’re throwing a house party or just want to dance in your room. This song starts a little soft but builds energy quickly and will have your friends asking for the name in no time. London combines an energetic beat with the nostalgic song “Big Spender” from the Broadway show “Sweet Charity.” This song sets the tone for any dance party or pregame.

“GDFR” — Flo Rida

“Big Spender” Theophilus London ft. A$AP Rocky 

 

If you like “Uptown Funk” by Mark Ronson featuring Bruno Mars, listen to “Down the Road” by C2C.

Yes, “Uptown Funk” is pretty funky, but Bruno Mars may need to take a step back. “Down the Road,” featuring sounds that could not be achieved with instruments alone, is more electronic than “Uptown Funk.” C2C mixes together old-school instrumentals and vocals with a driving beat into a song fit for any summertime car ride. The singer in “Down the Road” lacks the Mars’ vocals, but the remix holds its own in any upstanding playlist.

“Uptown Funk” — Mark Ronson ft. Bruno Mars

“Down the Road” — C2C

 

If you can never pick what to listen to, try Girl Talk or Super Mash Bros.

So some of us are pretty indecisive. After all, making choices is hard. Girl Talk and Super Mash Bros master the mash-up. If you have ever wondered what your favorite ’60s song sounds like with your favorite rap song, now is your chance to find out. If that’s not your cup of tea, there are plenty of mixes to choose from. Bonus — both groups offer their stuff FOR FREE from their web site. Who can say no to free stuff?

“Let it Out” — Girl Talk 

 

Photo Credit: Crystal Garcia | Daily Texan Staff

Ben Barker, co-founder of London-based PAN Studio, is bringing “talking lamps” to Austin. But for Barker and his co-founder Sam Hill, the biggest challenge wasn’t giving a lamppost the ability to talk via text message — it was figuring out what it would say. 

The premise behind Barker’s project, “Hello Lamp Post,” is simple: Anyone with a cellphone can text the object’s reference code to the project’s phone number — which will go live on the project’s website Thursday. Then the sender waits for them lamppost’s reply, and a conversation is born.

Carrie Brown, the Art in Public Places coordinator who helped bring the project to Austin from its birthplace in Bristol, U.K., said she liked the simplicity of the interaction. 

“You don’t need a smartphone, you don’t need to be able to get on the Internet, [and] you don’t need an app,” Brown said. “You just need to be able to send a text message. It’s really easy to engage with the project.” 

Brown collaborated with Asa Hursh, executive director of Art Alliance Austin, to bring the project to Austin. Hursh said he admires the tech-centered artistry of the project.

“We were excited about this combination of art and technology and expanding the representation of what art is and can be and what an artist is and what an artist can be,” Hursh said. 

Brown and Hursh met the PAN Studio artists when they came to town for last year’s South By Southwest. They worked together to make Austin’s streets come to life.

The idea for the project came from W.G. Sebald’s novel, “Austerlitz,” in which the protagonist learns about himself by exploring the world around him. Barker said this plot element motivated the PAN Studio team to think about how a city connects to its inhabitants and how much people can learn from its streets. 

“[The project] paints an image of our environment, the city, as a [guide] about how we got to be the way we are, where we can walk the streets and be reminded of the ingredients,” Barker said. “The project for us is about asking people to think differently about their environment and where the boundaries between citizens and services are.”

“Hello Lamp Post” is more than a conversation between a person and a bench — the objects share stories that other people have told them. 

“You approach it as if you’re talking to a lamppost or to inanimate objects,” Hursh said. “But what ends up happening is that it’s a facilitator for conversations among people. It really becomes ‘Hello Austin,’ in a way because it’s about communicating with one another.”  

The developers encourage participants to find and “wake up” as many objects as possible. Revisiting the same objects results in different conversations because the personalities change over time. As more people use the platform, the objects have more stories to tell. 

The project will run for 10 weeks in Austin, starting with a kickoff event at Republic Square Park on Thursday from 4–6 p.m. 

The developers hope to tour it in more cities, such as Tokyo. For now, Barker said he likes Austin because of its similarities to Bristol.

“If there is one city in the U.S. that has a similar feel [to Bristol], it’s Austin,” Barker said. “Much like Bristol, during the development people haven’t questioned the idea of talking to lampposts. They’ve just said, 'When can we start?'"

August was filled with strange and exciting album release announcements. From Aphex Twin’s weird blimp over London to Taylor Swift’s Yahoo live stream atop the Empire State Building, several artists have given music lovers something to look forward for the rest of the year. The Daily Texan made a list of some highly anticipated, end-of-the-year releases from around the musical spectrum. 

Karen O, Crush Songs 

After appearing on her own and receiving an Oscar nomination for her work on Spike Jonze’s “Her” soundtrack, the boisterous lead singer from the Yeah Yeah Yeahs is releasing her first solo album. Aside from the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Karen O also composed the soundtrack to “Where The Wild Things Are,” although the album is credited to Karen O And The Kids. A note about the album on the singer’s website says she crushed a lot when she was 27, and the tracks on Crush Songs are “the soundtrack to what was an ever continuing love crusade.” 

Sept. 9, Cult Records

Alt-J, This Is All Yours 

The three-piece alternative band from the UK achieved critical acclaim right away after winning the prestigious Mercury Music Prize for their debut album, An Awesome Wave. Mixing elements from folk and electronic music, alt-J makes music essentially perfect for trying to find your new identity after moving away to college. The first two singles released from This Is All Yours are “Every Other Freckle” and “Hunger Of The Pine,” which features a sample from Miley Cyrus’ 2013 song, “4x4.” 

Sept. 22, Infectious Music

Aphex Twin, Syro

On Aug. 16, a strange green blimp with Aphex Twin’s logo and “2014” written on the side was flying over the Oval Space in London. The logo also started appearing in New York City around the same time. A few days later, the British electronic musician announced a new album via Tor, a deep-web browser. Syro is the first release since 2001’s Drukqs. The track list for the album is mostly weird computer gibberish, and — in true Aphex Twin fashion — the cover artwork is kind of terrifying.

Sept. 23, Warp Records

Julian Casablancas + The Voidz, Tyranny 

The nasally lead singer from The Strokes releases the debut album from his newest side project, Julian Casablancas + The Voidz. Material from the new album appears in a promotional video on YouTube and in a weird video interview that looks like it was filmed on an old VHS camcorder. The band started touring together earlier in August and will play a show at Emo’s on Oct. 30. Tyranny is available for pre-order on the Cult Records website
for $3.87.

Sept. 23, Cult Records

Perfume Genius, Too Bright 

Put Your Back N 2 It, the 2012 release from Perfume Genius, is a smart, reflective look at the treatment of homosexuals, but it’s also so sad and fragile sounding that it’s hard to listen for too long. Mike Hadreas is back with a third album that already feels less wounded and more like a strong, aggressive declarative statement. The first single, “Queen,” is the loudest Hadreas has been yet and it comes with an incredible, chaotic music video.

Sept. 23, Matador Records

Taylor Swift, 1989 

In a fashion almost as cool as Beyonce’s surprise album drop last December, Taylor Swift debuted a new single and music video — and announced a release date for her newest album — on a Yahoo live stream earlier this month from the top of the Empire State Building. Already lauded as the perfect pop song by music critics, “Shake It Off” comes with a music video of Swift mostly looking crazy in front of professional dancers. Swift considers 1989 to be her official departure from the country genre into the pop genre. 

Oct. 27, Big
Machine Records

Glenn Morgan (left), head of service transformation at British Airways, speaks at a panel at the AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center on Tuesday. British Airway’s first London-to-Austin direct flight landed in Austin on Monday afternoon.

Photo Credit: Caleb Kuntz | Daily Texan Staff

The first transatlantic flight to arrive in Austin touched down at Austin-Bergstrom Airport on Monday afternoon at approximately 4:50 p.m. The service is the first of many to come for the new route offered by British Airways.

Austin and London residents will now have the luxury of flying directly between Heathrow Airport, British Airways’ main hub, and Austin-Bergstrom. The new service is also the only Austin flight provided on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

John McDonald, vice president of British Airways, said Austin is a prime destination because of the city’s growth and student population.    

“There’s a significant business travel corridor between Austin and London, but, obviously, Austin is a huge student city; we’re very aware of that,” McDonald said. “We’re keen to encourage as many students as we can to visit the UK [and] Europe and really get that cross cultural experience.”

McDonald said he is eager to work with the University with hopes of backing the business populace around campus.

“We’ll certainly be talking to the University seeing what we can do in terms of ‘how do we effectively get prices in the market [and] stay competitive’ … we’re really keen to work with [students] not just in terms of getting them on board … but how we actually work with students, support entrepreneurialism [and] support that element of the student community,” McDonald said.

Riane Corter, International Office program coordinator, said the new route will make travel arrangements easier for UT students in international and study abroad programs and incoming exchange students traveling to America.

“I think it’s going to be helpful for exchange partners to send their students directly to Austin,” Corter said. “Before, my students coming from London would have to fly into Houston or Dallas and then get another shuttle or another flight to connect to Austin. So, now, this direct route is going to be really helpful for them.”

Only on the market for two years, there are currently 122 Boeing 787s in service with more than 60 airlines operating the airliner. Skip Thompson, Boeing’s director of Airline Marketing Services, said the 787 Dreamliner is leading the way in aircraft technology.

“[The 787 is] the most advanced commercial jetliner in service,” Thompson said. “It’s an all composite fuselage. It’s an entirely new way of manufacturing a new airliner.” 

The first transatlantic flight to arrive in Austin touched down at Austin-Bergstrom Airport on Monday afternoon at approximately 4:50 p.m. The service is the first of many to come for the new route offered by British Airways.

Austin and London residents will now have the luxury of flying directly between Heathrow Airport, British Airways’ main hub, and Austin-Bergstrom. The new service is also the only Austin flight provided on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

John McDonald, vice president of British Airways, said Austin is a prime destination because of the city’s growth and student population.    

“There’s a significant business travel corridor between Austin and London, but, obviously, Austin is a huge student city; we’re very aware of that,” McDonald said. “We’re keen to encourage as many students as we can to visit the UK [and] Europe and really get that cross cultural experience.”

McDonald said he is eager to work with the University with hopes of backing the business populace around campus.

“We’ll certainly be talking to the University seeing what we can do in terms of ‘how do we effectively get prices in the market [and] stay competitive’ … we’re really keen to work with [students] not just in terms of getting them on board … but how we actually work with students, support entrepreneurialism [and] support that element of the student community,” McDonald said.

Riane Corter, International Office program coordinator, said the new route will make travel arrangements easier for UT students in international and study abroad programs and incoming exchange students traveling to America.

“I think it’s going to be helpful for exchange partners to send their students directly to Austin,” Corter said. “Before, my students coming from London would have to fly into Houston or Dallas and then get another shuttle or another flight to connect to Austin. So, now, this direct route is going to be really helpful for them.”

Only on the market for two years, there are currently 122 Boeing 787s in service with over 60 airlines operating the airliner. Skip Thompson, Boeing’s director of Airline Marketing Services, said the 787 Dreamliner is leading the way in aircraft technology.

“[The 787 is] the most advanced commercial jetliner in service,” Thompson said. “It’s an all composite fuselage. It’s an entirely new way of manufacturing a new airliner,” 

A Firefighter looks towards the fire damaged Bravanese Centre near Muswell Hill in north London Wednesday June 5, 2013.

Photo Credit: The Associated Press

UT students studying abroad in north London are approximately a mile away from a mosque that was set on fire Wednesday.

According to the Associated Press, a fire at the Somali Bravanese Welfare Association, or the Al-Rahma Islamic Center, is being investigated. After the fire, graffiti spelling out the name of a conservative right-wing group was found on a wall in the building. According to the AP, several mosques and Muslim centers have been targeted violently following the murder of Drummer Lee Rigby in May.

The students studying abroad are a part of the Roots of Social and Economic Justice program, where students learn about the historic roots of the social work program. According to Alexa Ura, a multimedia journalism senior in the program, 24 students are a part of the program.

Ura said all the students are safe.  

Editor’s Note: Alexa Ura is a former Daily Texan staffer. She is studying abroad in the summer.

Alexis Krauss of Sleigh Bells performs at the Myspace Secret Show Friday.

Photo Credit: Kelsey McKinney | Daily Texan Staff

We spent last night at the second of three Myspace "secret shows." These shows are open to badge members as well as very devout rumor followers who keep close tabs on the secret show wristband giveaways. We were lucky to make it into the 800 person Coppertank Events Center

Theophilus London 

London had his own stage on the north end of the events center where he started off the secret show by dee-jaying some favorite Top-40 songs from Nikki Minaj to Adele. People in the crowd were happy and feeling elitist for their entry into such a small venue. The air-conditioning blew strong and people bobbed around while sipping Tito's vodka. London was the "host" of the secret show, which really only meant that he would appear for 30 minute time blocks between sets to keep momentum up. 

songs to listen to: "I Stand Alone" and "Wine and Chocolates"

Dillion Francis

Francis led off the official myspace show with an electronica set. He wore a skinny tie and started off the set with a lot of excitement. Apparently, Francis came to fame because Diplo liked one of his songs and as we all know Diplo pretty much controls everything. This pick, however, might have been poor. Francis could not maintain momentum. He would raise the tempo of songs, have great audience participation, and then drop the beat into something slow that no one knew how to dance to. Everyone was happier when London reappeared. 

songs to listen to: "Here to China"

Sleigh Bells

After a thirty minute sound-check and microphone set-up, everyone was thrilled to welcome Sleigh Bells to the stage. Alexis Krauss wore her uniform: black leather studded jacket and cut off army print shorts. Her bangs fell down over her eyes only in the moments when she wasn't headbanging or dancing, which was never. Krauss is Sleigh Bells. She crowd surfed and let audience members sing into her microphone. For the entire hour set, Krauss never stopped moving and the audience danced with her. As evidenced by the massive clearout of the venue after Sleigh Bells' set, Krauss was the true reason for the show. 

songs to listen to: "Comeback Kid"  and "Riot Rythm" 

Flying Lotus

Flying Lotus set up a massive white screen in front of his DJ stand that projected geometric shapes and trancy graphics between him and the audience. Beween the Sleigh Bells set and Flying Lotus's set, not only did a mass exodus occur, but  the crowd turned over from from a group of WASPy dancers to many dreadlocked head-nodders. Lotus, whose music exists somewhere between the realms of electronic dance and acoustic rap, brought the tone back down to the inconsistent momentum of Dillon. We bailed after a few songs.

songs to listen to: "Zodiac Shit" and probably nothing else.

Here are some other shows we saw yesterday: 

Divine Fits

The gates were expanded for this year’s Auditorium Shores shows to accommodate larger crowds for the Divine Fits/Jim James/Flaming Lips performance. Divine Fits finished out a week of shows at the venue and fans kicked up dust as they danced along. In my opinion, they should have played after Jim James instead of before. Their performance was much more enjoyable.

Song to listen to: Would That Not Be Nice

Jim James

Jim James might actually be the most ridiculous performer I’ve ever seen. He came out wearing a suit and I’m not sure he ever actually stopped pacing across the front of the stage. I’m not sure what I hated more: the horrendous singing or the horrendously overdone guitar solos on the Flying V he had stationed at the front of the stage on a stand. Never seeing Jim James perform ever again would be nice.

Song to listen to: They are all awful

The Flaming Lips

In my opinion, Wayne Coyne can do no wrong, but a lot of people at Friday’s Auditorium Shores performance disagree. The Flaming Lips debuted their entire unreleased album, The Terror, which was complete with a provocative, in your face show that included light up baby dolls and a topless woman in a larger than life hamster ball. Upon finishing the new show, Coyne humored old fans by playing several songs from Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots. Coyne teased the possibility of Justin Timberlake joining the band on stage to perform Do You Realize??, but to our incredible dismay, it was Jim James and his ridiculous ego who came back onto the stage to help the Lips perform the closing song. Nonetheless, singing Do You Realize?? with Wayne Coyne and thousands of other people under a beautiful night sky in Austin, Texas is a beautiful experience. Somehow, people left disappointed. Haters gonna hate, I guess.

Song to listen to: Look, The Sun Is Rising 

 

Junior Christy Udoh brings Olympic experience and heart to a solid women’s track and field program after competing for Nigeria in the 2012 games. Udoh has been named to the Big 12 First-Team 10 times in her career and looks to add more accolades this season.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Garza | Daily Texan Staff

It was just last August that junior Christy Udoh found herself racing alongside the world’s premier sprinters at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

Udoh was one of 21 current and former Longhorns to compete in the Games, on a list that includes Texas legends like Kevin Durant and Sanya Richards-Ross. Unlike the majority of her fellow Longhorns however, Udoh did not sport the red, white and blue of the U.S. Instead, she donned the green and white colors of Nigeria, the country where both her parents were born and where she shares dual citizenship.

“It dawned on me that if I wanted to be on an Olympic team, I would have to beat out a lot of Americans to do so,” Udoh said. “I was glad to have another nationality to run for, so I contacted someone from Nigeria and they wanted me to run for them.”

In fact, the African country had been pursuing Udoh since she was in middle school, wanting the talented sprinter to run for the nation that holds her roots. Udoh would go on to qualify for Nigeria’s 4X100-meter relay team as well as a spot in the 200-meter dash.

What Udoh achieved by getting to the London games has changed her career and life forever. And despite not medaling at the Olympics, the young sprinter has never taken the experience for granted.

“That was the biggest thing in life that I ever accomplished,” Udoh said. “Now when I train for my next Olympics I know what to do and what not to do.”

Since returning to the 40 Acres, Udoh has not lost a step. The 10-time All-Big 12 First Team runner (six times outdoor, four times indoor) has had two top-three finishes in the 60-meter dash and five top-three finishes in the 200-meter dash this indoor season, two of those coming as victories. 

Udoh also holds the school’s eighth fastest mark ever (22.72) in the outdoor 200-meter dash, a time she clocked last summer at the NCAA Outdoor Championships.

And while NCAA competition is no laughing matter, it does not compare to the level of athleticism present at an Olympic event. Through Udoh, the Longhorns have found experience that is hard to come by. What the Olympian has been able to provide is track and field wisdom at its highest level. 

For the Texas squad and its interim head coach Rose Brimmer, it is that type of intangible that makes her special to the team.

“She’s gained some wisdom and some knowledge about the level of what it takes to be a scorer not just on the Big 12 level or the national level but the Olympic level,” Brimmer said. “[She] went against the best, so [she] doesn’t have to be afraid of anybody.”

Udoh and the No. 7 Longhorns will compete this Friday and Saturday in Fayetteville, Ark., at the NCAA Indoor Championships. It will be the fourth time the team has visited the Randal Tyson Track Center in 2013. The venue has treated Texas well this year, with 10 Longhorns combining for 13 career-best marks there.

Udoh will compete in the 200-meter dash Friday beginning with semifinals at 7:35 p.m.

“I feel like everyone is going to bring their ‘A’ game because everyone wants to be a winner,” Udoh said. “As for me, I’m going to push myself this weekend with a goal of doing something great.”

Published on March 8, 2013 as "Udoh earning her stripes".