Columbus

OpenCalais Metadata: Latitude: 
39.9880555556
OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 
-91.1475
Photo Credit: Anik Bhattacharya | Daily Texan Staff

This article was corrected after its original posting. Forbes ranking came out in 2006.

Student life on any college campus can often consist of the occasional sip of alcohol. Recently, Austin was ranked by The Daily Beast as one of the top five drunkest cities in America.

Other cities ranked above Austin are: Charleston, S.C.; Milwaukee, Wis.; Norfolk, Va.; and Boston, Mass. The rankings are based on the average number of alcoholic drinks consumed by adults per month, percentage of population classified as binge drinkers and percentage of population classified as heavy drinkers.

Austin's place has not changed from a 2006 ranking by Forbes that also found it as the fifth drunkest city.

Other cities ranked above Austin on the list were Milwaukee, Wis.; Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.; Columbus, Mo; and Boston, Mass., respectively.  Cities were ranked on the basis of five categories: strictness of state laws, number of drinkers, number of heavy drinkers, number of binge drinkers and rate of alcoholism. 

Cities were ranked on the strictness of state laws based on the “Rating The States” report conducted and written by Mothers Against Drunk Driving. The report considered factors such as whether the state has passed laws forbidding open containers in cars or laws regarding the regulation and sale of alcohol.

According to the Texas Department of Transportation, there were 1,129 DWI or alcohol related car crashes and injuries in 2011 in Austin.

Statistics regarding the number of drinkers in the various categories were taken from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey conducted in 2004. According to the survey, adults who reported having had at least one drink of alcohol within the past 30 days were considered drinkers and adults who reported having five or more drinks on one occasion were considered binge drinkers. The number of heavy drinkers was calculated based on the number of adult men who reported having had more than two drinks per day, and adult women having had more than one drink per day.

In determining the rate of alcoholism, Forbes looked at the number of Alcoholics Anonymous meetings held in the area as a ratio of the drinking age population.

Anthropology sophomore Samuel Deleon said it has become socially acceptable to drink in college. It is easy to access alcohol, especially with such a large population, Deleon said.

“If you search liquor stores in Austin, 161 store listings will come up,” Deleon said. “So it is easy to find alcohol and easy for older students to access it for younger students.”

Printed on Tuesday, April 2, 2013 as: Sixth Street, fifth place 

NHL: Making a playoff case for each of the West’s bottom seven teams

Hang on to your hats, folks, because the destiny of several teams will come down to the last week or even day of the regular season. In the West, every team has a shot with 19-20 games left. Here’s a playoff case for each of the West’s bottom seven.

9) Phoenix Coyotes (13-12-4): They’ve never really found a consistent stride so far this year, but they’ve been able to stay afloat in the West even without critical goal scorers Radim Vrbata and Martin Hanzal for several games. Once Vrbata returns the ‘Yotes will have that all-important scorer spreading the ice on the right wing. Mike Smith might be the most inconsistent goalie in the league, but when he’s on, he’s one of the league’s best. The ‘Yotes should look at last season’s finish as motivation. They peaked at the right time and were three wins away from the Finals. This is a playoff-caliber team.

10) Dallas Stars (13-12-3): Their season has mirrored that of Phoenix so far: ups and downs without much consistency. But this team can make the playoffs with its effective combination of young speedsters and a stabilizing veteran presence. Winger Cody Eakin and big defenseman Brenden Dillion have been absolute revelations for the Stars this season, and Jaromir Jagr seems to forget that he is 41 years old, currently leading the Stars in scoring. Kari Lehtonen has been a little inconsistent as of late, but has been by and large as advertised this season. The biggest question mark for the Stars is a constant defensive intensity. If they can establish that, they have enough offense to get into the playoffs. Dallas is also a playoff-level team.

11) Edmonton Oilers (11-11-6): I am in love with the offensive core of the Oil. They’ve been suffering in the standings for years but all that time in the cellar has finally paid off with established players like Taylor Hall, Jordan Eberle, Nail Yakupov, Sam Gagner, etc. They are one of the league’s youngest teams, and are right up there with the league’s most entertaining. They, like Dallas, will rely on the spirited energy of their young legs to simply outskate their opponents. But they do have a lot of talent. Their forwards constantly circle around the offensive zone, the puck is never stagnant and they have the ability to just wear opposing teams down. Their defense has been spotty, but G Devan Dubnyk has been solid. They can be a tough out in the first round.

12) Nashville Predators (11-12-6): Pretty disappointing record for a team as well constructed as this one. Their offense has been anemic and their penalty kill ranks 26th league-wide: a self-destructive combination. Their blue line has clearly dropped a bit with the loss of star D-man Ryan Suter, yet they are still the league’s eighth best defense. They are leaning harder on their goalie, Pekka Rinne, than any team in the league leans on theirs, but if their offense can just become average they will be able to stay in games. Rinne is that good. They’ll be a lower seed at best, but elite goaltending can carry you.

13) Columbus Blue Jackets (11-12-6): If there was a “Most Improved Team” award, Columbus would get it. Sixteen games in and I thought they were done, but they have slowly clawed their way back into the playoff race. Although they have some exciting players, they are probably the least likely playoff team in the bottom seven. If anything, sheer momentum could slip them into the top eight.

14) Calgary Flames (11-12-4): They’ve featured a solid offense highlighted by Curtis Glencross, Alex Tanguay and Lee Stempniak, and their power play is in the league’s top 10. Their greatest concern is consistent goaltending – Miikka Kiprusoff has been in and out of the lineup this whole season. If he can re-establish himself in the pipes, they have they firepower to compete in a first round series.

15) Colorado Avalanche (10-14-4): Somehow they are in the bottom 20 in the league in every major category. Go figure. Despite their place in the standings, this team is not the worst in the conference. They have highly coveted centers Matt Duchene, Paul Stastny and winger Gabriel Landeskog. G Semyon Varlamov needs to be better, along with everything else. But it really is a mystery why this team only has 24 points after 28 games. I think they are better than Columbus.

Hang on to your hats folks, because the destiny of several teams will come down to the last week or even day of the regular season. In the west, every team has a shot with 19-20 games left. Here’ s a playoff case for each of the West’s bottom seven.

9) Phoenix Coyotes (13-12-4): They’ve never really found a consistent stride so far this year, but they’ve been able to stay afloat in the West even without critical goal scorers Radim Vrbata and Martin Hanzal for several games. Once Vrbata returns the ‘Yotes will have that all-important scorer spreading the ice on the right wing. Mike Smith might be the most inconsistent goalie in the league, but when he’s on he’s one of the league’s best. The ‘Yotes should look at last season’s finish as motivation. They peaked at the right time and were three wins away from the Finals. This is a playoff-caliber team.

10) Dallas Stars (13-12-3): Their season has mirrored that of Phoenix’ so far: ups and downs without much consistency. But this team can make the playoffs with its effective combination of young speedsters and a stabilizing veteran presence. Winger Cody Eakin and big defenseman Brenden Dillion have been absolute revelations for the Stars this season, and Jaromir Jagr seems to forget that he is 41 years old, currently leading the stars in scoring. Kari Lehtonen has been a little inconsistent as of late, but has been by and large as advertised this season. The biggest question mark for the Stars is a constant defensive intensity. If they can establish that, they have enough offense to get in to the playoffs. Dallas is also a playoff level team.

11) Edmonton Oilers (11-11-6): I am in love with the offensive core of the Oil. They’ve been suffering in the standings for years but all that time in the cellar has finally paid off with established players like Taylor Hall, Jordan Eberle, Nail Yakupov, Sam Gagner, etc. They are one of the league’s youngest teams, and are right up there with the league’s most entertaining. They, like Dallas, will rely on the spirited energy of their young legs to simply outskate their opponents. But they do have a lot of talent. Their forwards constantly circle around the offensive zone, the puck is never stagnant, and they have the ability to just wear opposing teams down. Their defense has been spotty, but G Devan Dubnyk has been solid. They can be a tough out in the first round.

12) Nashville Predators (11-12-6): Pretty disappointing record for a team as well-constructed as they are. Their offense has been anemic and their penalty kill ranks 26th league-wide: a self-destructive combination. Their blue line has clearly dropped a bit with the loss of star D man Ryan Suter, yet they are still the league’s eighth best defense. They are leaning harder on their goalie, Pekka Rinne, than any team in the league leans on theirs, but if their offense can just become average they will be able to stay in games. Rinne is that good. They’ll be a lower seed at best, but elite goaltending can carry you.

13) Columbus Blue Jackets (11-12-6): If there was a “Most Improved Team” award, Columbus would get it. 16 games in and I thought they were done, but they have slowly clawed their way back into the playoff race. Although they have some exciting players, they are probably the least-likely playoff team in the bottom seven. If anything, sheer momentum could slip them into the top eight.

14) Calgary Flames (11-12-4): They’ve featured a solid offense highlighted by Curtis Glencross, Alex Tanguay, and Lee Stempniak, and their power play is in the league’s top ten. Their greatest concern is consistent goaltending – Mikka Kirprusoff has been in and out of the lineup this whole season. If he can re-establish himself in the pipes, they have they firepower to compete in a first round series.

15) Colorado Avalanche (10-14-4): Somehow they are bottom 20 in the league in every major category. Go figure. Despite their place in the standings, this team is not the worst in the conference. They have highly-coveted centers Matt Duchene, Paul Stastny and winger Gabriel Landeskog. G Semyon Varlamov needs to be better, along with everything else. But it really is a mystery why this team only has 24 points after 28 games. I think they are better than Columbus, and they will be in the hunt at end.

 

Each time the golf team boards a plane to one of their tournaments, whether it be a flight to Chicago, Ill., or one to Columbus, Ohio, junior Dylan Frittelli has to listen to his fellow teammates complain. The flight is too long. Their legs are cramped. Airplane food sucks.

Frittelli has no sympathy.

“The guys complain about our two-hour flight to Chicago,” he laughs. “I tell them, ‘Guys, it’s a lot better than a 23-hour flight to South Africa.”

The first time he made the trip from his hometown of Pretoria, South Africa, to the states was in 1995, when he and his family went to Disney World. Frittelli could have spun in the tea cups until he was sick, flirted with Minnie, walked out of the Magic Kingdom with as many Mickey ears as there are days of the year and even somehow managed to play golf with the Epcot ball; it still wouldn’t have been the best trip to America he’s ever taken.

Fast forward 12 years. It was an e-mail sent from Pretoria, South Africa, to Austin that started Dylan’s journey from the country of the vuvuzela horn to the land of the Longhorns. His father, Raymond Frittelli, wanted the coach of a major college program to take notice of what his son had done on a golf course. So he wrote up a message and listed accomplishments fit to impress: No. 1 in both the South African Amateur and Junior rankings, 44th in the Scratch Players World Amateur rankings and the South African Junior Golf Foundation’s Golfer of the Year for 2007.

Sent some 9,156 miles away, head golf coach John Fields received the e-mail. He liked what he saw, especially where the e-mail came from.

“In that e-mail from Dylan’s father, the No. 1 thing that caught my attention was the fact that he was from South Africa,” Fields said. “There have been many fine golfers from there and I had confidence that he could be another one because of the success that South Africans have had playing collegiate golf in the past. That No. 1 ranking caught my attention, too.”

Fields and the rest of the Frittelli family kept in contact. After Dylan’s junior year ended, he notified Fields that he would be competing in an upcoming golf tournament in San Diego and he was interested in taking an unofficial visit to Texas.

Fields was on board.

More than 1,000 miles away from Austin, Fields — along with the rest of the golf world — watched Frittelli win the 2007 Callaway Junior World Championship at famous Torrey Pines in San Diego, Calif. That day at Torrey Pines signaled a new beginning for Frittelli, which he refers to as his ticket to Texas.

“Callaway was the first opportunity that I had to see him,” Fields said. “To see him win that, it was very impressive. A lot of great players, including South African Ernie Els, have won that tournament. After seeing him play in San Diego, I knew I wanted him to be a student athlete at the University of Texas.”

A trip to Austin and a scholarship offer were enough for Frittelli to commit. He liked the campus and took a special interest in the local golf courses. Considering he had only been a full-time golf player for about three years before committing to Texas makes it remarkable how quickly Frittelli ascended into the upper echelon of the junior golf world. He was a four-sport athlete in high school, participating in field hockey, cricket, tennis and golf.

“I went to a small private school on a sports scholarship,” Frittelli said. “I went and asked them if I could focus solely on golf rather than continuing the rest of the sports, as well. They said no, so I picked up on a home-school program and began traveling around to play in junior golf tournaments. I was constantly on the go.”

He still is. At Texas, he’s had the opportunity to go all around the country. Frittelli has been to more than 15 states in America. This weekend, the golf team travels to Florida to compete in the Isleworth Collegiate Invitational. Frittelli won’t be there. He has a 13-hour plane flight to catch.

“I was selected to represent South Africa at the World Amateur Team Championships in Argentina,” he said. “It’s definitely a huge honor for me to represent my country. Being acknowledged by them is a huge achievement in my books.”

For one week in Argentina, Frittelli’s efforts will be dedicated to his homeland. When he returns to Texas, he’ll refocus on the collegiate season. He is a member of No. 8 Texas’ important trio: The grouping of him, senior Bobby Hudson and sophomore Cody Gribble that represent Texas’ best shot at a national championship.

“We [the three] have to keep ourselves playing well,” Frittelli said. “If we get a little bit of help from the other guys, we’ll definitely be in contention for the nationals. But we’re the main core of the team.”

The way Fields says it, Frittelli is the guy that keeps the Longhorns on track.

“The incredible thing about Dylan is that he’s organized, mature and goal-oriented,” he said. “His organized approach to success has elevated the team’s success. He has become a tremendous leader and I think that comes from his worldwide experience.”

Men's golf

Another tournament, another successful showing for the No. 8 ranked Texas men’s golf team. The trip to Columbus, Ohio, to compete in the Jack Nicklaus Invitational at Scioto Country Club reaped them a third-place finish in the final team standings. The seeds of such labors were sewn in the last two rounds of the tournament, where the Longhorns scored the best collective score for those 36 holes out of the entire field with an 8-over par.

A strong finish like that was just what the Longhorns needed, as they struggled out of the gate in the first of their three rounds.

“We got off to a poor start,” said Texas golf head coach John Fields. “I’m really pleased that our guys came back the way they did the final two rounds, with the low score over the final 36 holes.”

The surge to finish near the top of the standings — Texas was only one shot behind the runner-up, Illinois — was spearheaded by the familiar names of senior Bobby Hudson and junior Dylan Frittelli. Each finished in the top 10 individually, with Hudson tying for eighth place at 7-over after struggling a bit on the first nine holes. Frittelli, who notched his first top-10 finish of the young season, earned 10th place with an 8-over.

“Bobby came back today with a 31 on the final nine, which was certainly extremely helpful in getting us to a third-place finish,” said Fields. “He just did not let down, and I did not expect he would. The same is true for Dylan, who played extremely well today.”

With the usually sensational sophomore Cody Gribble not playing up to his standards, Fields was glad to see sophomore Julio Vegas step up. In just his second college start, Vegas tied for 11th place with his score of 11-over.

“Julio had a good summer and he has used that momentum to come in and help us this fall, and that has been great,” said Fields. “We needed him to do that.”

The Longhorns leave the Midwest with a Texas-sized chip on their shoulders. They finished with their best team ranking of the season, but would surely like a mulligan for their admittedly poor first round of the tournament. After all, Texas finished only seven shots shy of first-place team Oklahoma State. Fields believes that it’s the tournaments like these that will shape his team into the championship-caliber squad he expects them to become.

“We know we must get significantly better,” he said. “Every player on our team is challenging themselves to do that. The only way to do that is to challenge ourselves with this great schedule with events at great courses. Playing here was a great experience for our guys.” 

Men's golf

So far, in two 15-team tournaments this season, the No. 8 UT men’s golf team has finished in the fifth and sixth spots. The Longhorns look to build upon that strong start as they travel to Columbus, Ohio to compete in the Jack Nicklaus Invitational at Scioto Country Club, Oct. 11-12.

Nicklaus, widely regarded as the best golfer of all time, learned to play at Scioto, which gives the trip to Columbus the feel of one-part golf tournament, other-part field trip to one of the more important and historical golf courses in America.

“The course is the home of Jack Nicklaus,” said head coach John Fields. “We have not played there, but we know it’s a great, old golf course. We’re looking forward to playing in this tournament, and it has another great field of teams.”

In another competitive field, Texas will have to fight No. 2 Oklahoma State, No. 3 LSU, and No. 7 Illinois.

Texas’ best hopes rest on its trifecta of stars: senior Bobby Hudson, junior Dylan Frittelli and sophomore Cody Gribble. All have had bright moments this year, as each have finished in the top-15 individually at one of the two tournaments. Gribble, the youngest of the group, has earned praise from his coach.

“Gribble jumps out there as the leader of our team this week because he was our low man at [the previous tournament at] Karsten Creek,” Fields said. “He came back with a pair of 70s in the final round, and if you haven’t played there, you may not understand how extraordinary that is. That is great golf.”

So far, in two 15-team tournaments this season, the No. 8 UT men’s golf team has finished in the fifth and sixth spots. The Longhorns look to build upon that strong start as they travel to Columbus, Ohio to compete in the Jack Nicklaus Invitational at Scioto Country Club, Oct. 11-12.

Nicklaus, widely regarded as the best golfer of all time, learned to play at Scioto, which gives the trip to Columbus the feel of one-part golf tournament, other-part field trip to one of the more important and historical golf courses in America.

“The course is the home of Jack Nicklaus,” said head coach John Fields. “We have not played there, but we know it’s a great, old golf course. We’re looking forward to playing in this tournament, and it has another great field of teams.”

In another competitive field, Texas will have to fight No. 2 Oklahoma State, No. 3 LSU, and No. 7 Illinois.

Texas’ best hopes rest on its trifecta of stars: senior Bobby Hudson, junior Dylan Frittelli and sophomore Cody Gribble. All have had bright moments this year, as each have finished in the top-15 individually at one of the two tournaments. Gribble, the youngest of the group, has earned praise from his coach.

“Gribble jumps out there as the leader of our team this week because he was our low man at [the previous tournament at] Karsten Creek,” Fields said. “He came back with a pair of 70s in the final round, and if you haven’t played there, you may not understand how extraordinary that is. That is great golf.”

Men's Diving

Before spring break even began, Texas’ divers traveled to College Station for the NCAA Zone Diving competition, a three-day event where participants attempted to qualify for the NCAA championships, which will be held Thursday through Saturday in Columbus, Ohio.

Last season’s NCAA 1-meter diving champion Drew Livingston and junior Matt Cooper both earned NCAA berths. Their names were added to the Longhorns’ 19-man list of NCAA hopefuls, including Olympians Ricky Berens, David Walters and freshman sensation Austin Surhoff.

While the rest of the school was away, the team had been preparing for its biggest meet of the year.

Compared to other schools, Texas is sending the largest contingent of swimmers and divers to Columbus. Ohio State, California, Auburn and Arizona are each taking 18 competitors, respectively.