• Lege goes home, cue empty bragging

    Imagine being a typical shy kid at summer camp. You go off to a foreign place for a few weeks, have to meet new people and get involved in new situations. Inevitably, you'll realize that certain people are being more outgoing or otherwise more successful than you. Perhaps during the big dance, you'll be too shy to talk to those aesthetically pleasing members of the opposite sex, instead lurking silently in the back.

    This narrative, though, gets positively wharped once you return back to your native town. Instead of uneasiness, timidity and fright, the recollection you transmit to your friends is one of you being the suave, fearless and ever-popular center of the party.

    This is basically what happens to members of the state Legislature once the body adjourns sine die and the members disperse throughout the state to their individual constituencies.

    It doesn't matter how feckless a freshman representative might have been on the floor of the House this session, when he — or, sadly, far less often, she — returns home the ineffectiveness is brushed aside and replaced with tales of their audacious leadership on some big partisan issue.

    Take state Rep. Matt Rinaldi (R-Irving), a freshman representative already in a contentious primary fight for renomination. Rinaldi, who had an unsuccessful session with no bills making it out of the chamber and onto Gov. Abbott’s desk, is already touting how ostensibly invaluable he was during his first 140 days in government. He points to his supposed work on gun rights, anti-abortion legislation and even anti-LGBT matters — all better, I suppose, than admitting the spectacularly inefficient and unsuccessful legislative season this year.

    I suppose, too, it's a better way to whitewash that Austin sleep-away camp experience.

    Horwitz is the Senior Associate Editor.

  • Leaders need to get their act together, get back our Blue Bell, Whataburger

    “The night is always darkest before the dawn.” — Batman

    The proud nation of Texas has fallen on perhaps the hardest times it has ever faced in its one million year history as a country. Let's not confuse the issue, we Texans are a strong people who could probably withstand anything. In the entire world. But all of us, like the famed Trojan warrior Achilles, have a weakness. And that is our food.

    Since the Great Blue Bell Crisis of 2015, Texans have been suffering, bleeding, for two long months. And now that Whataburger has announced shortened breakfast hours, I don’t know how much more we can take. Our strong bodies and minds need the enriching sustenance of ice cream and early morning tacos. In this rare moment of weakness, I ask you this: where are our politicians?

    It has been 59 days since Texas store owners began removing our nectar of the gods, otherwise known as Blue Bell Ice Cream, from store shelves. That’s 59 days too long. And how did our "leaders" respond to this? The FDA had to go launch an investigation into Blue Bell. If you were to believe them, this most Texan of dessert companier knew about the listeria outbreak and chose to ship the cartons anyway. Who would you believe: Bluebell or Obama?

    Yeah, that’s what I thought.

    When Whataburger announced its severely shortened breakfast hours on Monday, I swear I felt an angry rumble of Texans' tummies roar across the Texas hill country. Before yesterday, you would have had to take my 11p.m. honey butter chicken biscuit from my cold, dead hands.

    Where, in these most trying of times, is Gov. Abbott, I ask you? We are but children in this world without breakfast taquitos. Yet, Gov. Abbott remains locked away in his Governor’s Mansion, as out of reach with the Texas people as Whata breakfast burritos are from me right now.

    Apparently, Gov. Abbott is too busy wining and dining fat cat Whataburger lobbyists to give a thought to our problems. To all the leaders who cut a deal on my HBCB game and cut hard-working Texans out, all I have to say this: I’ll keep my guns, religion and Whataburger, you keep the change.

    Now, I’m not an educated woman. I’ve only been to two countries in my life (the United States of America and Texas) but I know right from wrong. Where are our leaders?

  • See you this summer!

    This blog is going on hiatus for a few weeks, but it will be back in early June under the leadership of incoming editor-in-chief Claire Smith.

    In the meantime, feel free to peruse our previous content or keep up with our ongoing news coverage!

    Brands is editor-in-chief.

  • Don't leave anything to chance when it comes to your car

    When the police say hide, lock and take, they mean hide, lock and take. West Campus saw 47 car burglaries from the end of March to the end of April. Like APD Officer William Harvey said, these burglaries are a crime of opportunity.  

    Several months ago, my vehicle was stolen from my apartment complex's garage overnight when my keys were left in the driver's seat after a miscommunication with my roommate. Car thieves are constantly out and constantly vigilant. There are no "free passes" or safety from burglars, even when your car is in a garage.  

    A lot of the West Campus apartment complex garages are easily accessed by non-residents, meaning the illusion of safety parking in one is just that, an illusion. 

    Why leave your expensive camera or brand new laptop in your car at all? Cars are very "public access" possessions. Anyone can look in and see what you have. 

    The best advice is to keep absolutely nothing in your car, besides maybe a CD collection in your console. Sure, there is always the risk of a thief breaking your window to snoop around, but this chance is reduced if nothing is visible at all.  

    Having your car burglarized sucks. You never really "know" about something until it happens to you, but believe me — you don't want this to happen to you.

    Bounds is an associate editor.

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