Latest Davis attack ad does not get voters on her side

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Gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis makes a stop at the Family Crisis Center in Harlingen, Texas, Friday, Aug, 8 2014, to speak on the topic of domestic violence and the efforts she has made to help the victims of this crime. (AP Photo/Valley Morning Star, Maricela Rodriguez)

 
Gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis makes a stop at the Family Crisis Center in Harlingen, Texas, Friday, Aug, 8 2014, to speak on the topic of domestic violence and the efforts she has made to help the victims of this crime. (AP Photo/Valley Morning Star, Maricela Rodriguez)  

In her latest attack ad, state Senator Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, the Democratic candidate for governor, accused her Republican opponent, Attorney General Greg Abbott, of prolonging prosecution of sexual abuses occurring at West Texas State School, a juvenile detention center in Pyote, Texas. Keeping with the theme of “Greg Abbott, Insider General”, Davis’ campaign leaves out important facts once again. But the real issue is that ever since someone gave the Davis camp a video camera, the message never concentrates on the task on which Davis needs to focus in order to be victorious — attracting voters from the other side and galvanizing certain demographic groups that would statistically vote Democrat but don’t vote in high numbers.

Just as she did in her ad criticizing Abbott’s dissent in a Texas Supreme Court case involving the compensation to a woman after she suffered a sexual assault by a salesman whom she had let into her home, Davis plays to the ignorance of the lay person who does not consider legal technicalities. The latest ad claims that despite requests for prosecution from a Texas Ranger, the Attorney General’s office waited 11 months before prosecuting those guilty of abuse; during that period, more allegations arose. Abbott’s campaign responded by saying that the Attorney General’s office must wait to receive a request for assistance from the local district attorney’s office before taking action. While I would agree that bureaucracy hampers government expediency and that red tape is an inherent problem in government, at the end of the thirty seconds, I’m still left wondering what the point of the ad is.

As a Democrat vying for a statewide office, Davis has failed miserably to appeal to those who are the most participatory in Texas elections, and the state senator has not given those who typically don’t vote any reason to rush to the polls. Before releasing another ad, the Davis campaign needs to consider what is to be gained because I’d be willing to bet some money that the ad has not changed anyone’s mind, meaning no new recruits for Davis. The ad excellently reinforces the viewpoints of those already supporting Davis for governor. Good job. Those people weren’t voting for Abbott in the first place. Now, why should those who aren’t voting for the candidate, whether out of ideological differences or apathy, care?

Davis is an associate editor.