Filibuster anniversary shows a stagnant campaign

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Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, speaks as she begins a filibuster in an effort to kill an abortion bill, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, in Austin, Texas
Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, speaks as she begins a filibuster in an effort to kill an abortion bill, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, in Austin, Texas

Of the many mistakes of the Wendy Davis campaign for governor, the most recent is the campaign’s decision to invite people to an abortion party. In an effort to celebrate the 11-hour filibuster that propelled state Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, to fame, the campaign is holding an anniversary party, which originally cost $20 to attend, Wednesday at the Palmer Events Center. However, bleak ticket sales have led the Davis campaign to give tickets away to interested parties for free. It doesn’t matter that the real meaning of the event is to laud the triumph of a woman who was determined to give a voice to women whose reproductive rights were being decided upon by a room full of men in the Texas Legislature. Everything points back to abortion. Despite the attempt to remind Texans why we should care about Davis, no one is pro-abortion, and no one — pro-life or pro-choice — wants to even seem to celebrate abortion because the subject is touchy among all individuals.

With recent polls showing Davis standing little chance of being the first Democrat elected to a statewide position in 20 years, it is understandable why her campaign would like to highlight the sole reason she will even be on the ballot in November. Not only is the Davis campaign seemingly asking people to celebrate abortion, but it also cheers her almost victory, which is really a failure. Remember, the bill that Davis filibustered eventually passed during a subsequent special session.

If the Davis campaign wants voters to get excited about the potential radical change that will come if Davis is elected, everyone needs to move on from the filibuster. People want to be on a winning team, and reminding them that the Davis campaign actually started with a loss is not very smart. It’s old news, and to voters, an anniversary party just shows that one year has passed, and nothing new is happening chez Wendy Davis.

Davis is an associate editor.