McCombs BBA commemorates 100th birthday with celebration

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Photo Credit: Yifan Lyu | Daily Texan Staff

The McCombs School of Business’ Bachelor of Business Administration program celebrated its 100th birthday last night.

The McCombs Student Life Organization hosted a birthday party featuring an appearance from Bevo, performances by Texas Cheer and Pom and speeches by David Platt, Associate Dean for Undergrad Programs and alumnus Sam Acho, a linebacker for the Chicago Bears. Despite a last-minute change in location because of rain, hundreds of students filled the atrium inside the business building. Platt said the event is meant to celebrate the current school as well as its history.

“The evolution of McCombs over the last hundred years has not been linear,” Platt said. “We started as a wooden shack and two professors, then our students left for World War II and came back after the GI bill. Then we matched demand to resources and created a business foundation that lasted till today.”

Platt said although there is nothing particularly magical about one year or another, he does feel honored to be part of McCombs’ future.

“We are revising our strategy for McCombs,” Platt said. “We will be targeting entrepreneurship and a collaboration with the Dell Medical School in healthcare. We are also looking at some facility changes like the new MBA building and adding some classrooms in the current building.”

Platt said the business school will keep its core mission.

“I am proud of where we are today,” Platt said. “I hope our students continue to grow into the ideals of the University, which is to serve greater mankind. I hope they go on to have rewarding lives, however they define that.”

Eric Hunt, undergraduate Business Council BBA chair, said the purpose of the event is to show that McCombs cares about its students.

“Some people might think of McCombs as very academic and competitive,” said Hunt, supply chain management junior. “In reality, we want to be more inclusive and collaborative. I think we need to let students know that it’s okay to do something other than investment banking or management or consulting. McCombs will support you no matter what you do.”

Business freshman Aleyiah Pena said although she feels special to be part of McCombs, she hopes its future includes a more diverse student body.

“I think we can do better in diversity,” Pena said. “Only 14 percent of our students are underrepresented minorities. That number could probably be higher. As a Hispanic, it makes me proud to see other Hispanic students in the business school.”