Sports reporter leaves couch for real world

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Senior sports writer Aaron Torres worked at The Daily Texan for one-and-a-half years. He was a general sports writer, senior sports writer and the sports editor in the summer of 2015. He will miss being at the basement every day and seeing all of his friends there.
Photo Credit: Amy Zhang | Daily Texan Staff

I laid in bed Tuesday at 3 a.m., tossing and turning and thinking.

I had to write this missive and turn it in 17 hours. But I didn’t know who to thank, to praise, to compliment. I didn’t know what to write.

Like the speech of an Oscar-winner, I have so many people to thank, but there’s a limit — time limits them. Inches limit me.  

For some reason, I became curious about diamonds. So I thumbed through my phone until I got to a Wikipedia page titled “Diamond.” I wanted to know how they’re made and where they come from.

What I learned: They are made underground.

When I started at The Daily Texan, I thought I would be here for my entire collegiate career. I thought this was the pinnacle of journalism for a student at UT — working for one of the best student newspapers in the U.S.

But I knew this would be my last semester. What I needed was more time here because, like anyone leaving a place, I’m left asking, “Where did the time go?”

But I know where the time went and where most of it was spent — in the office. It’s where I ate; it’s where I cried; it’s where I slept. There probably hasn’t been a day of school when I wasn’t in the office. It’s because that’s where most of my friends are — where the people are elegant, precious and beautiful like diamonds.

They are the people who will stay up with you until 3 a.m. in the office on a summer day to support you. The ones that place a sticky note on your computer wishing you good luck on your test and that “Roger is rooting for you.” The great friends that place a packet of peanut M&M’s on your desk with another sticky note that says to cheer up. (That sticky note is still in my wallet.)

I’m glad I joined the Texan, and I think most people who work here are glad they joined, too. The sports writers who critiqued me, the Life&Arts and photo editors who I played Ping-Pong with, the other staffers I played staffsketball with and also became friends with. The two page designers who became like my sisters — one younger, the other older — who I looked forward to seeing every single day.

You should join the Texan. You’ll have a blast. If you don’t know where it is, just go to the HSM building and take the elevator or the stairs underground. You’ll enter a place where careers begin. Where friendships are born.

Where diamonds are found.

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