Tat-Tuesday: Students share stories behind ink

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Photo Credit: Melanie Westfall | Daily Texan Staff

Editor’s note: Tat-Tuesday is a weekly series that features students around campus and their tattoos.

Photos by Graeme Hamilton

Angie Rodgers

MyTable representative Angie Rodgers has a mustache tattoo on her middle finger and an elephant head on her left arm.

“I decided that getting a mustache on my finger was a great idea,” Rodger said. “I’m also a teacher, and my students never believe that it’s real. So I let them try to wash it off sometimes.”

Rodgers spent her college years traveling and volunteering in Thailand where she worked with elephants. The tattoo on her arm commemorates those experiences abroad.

“The elephants are from an elephant sanctuary in Thailand,” Rodgers said. “Underneath is a phrase in Thai that means ‘non-violence and compassion.’ It’s a Buddhist principle, and I believe animal activism is really important.”

Neil Perleberg

Philosphy senior Neil Perleberg is most proud of the monster head tattoo on his left knee because of the pain he endured under the needle. He got the work done by a celebrity tattoo artist named Chad Koeplinger, who currently works at the Rock of Ages tattoo parlor in Austin.

“He’s one of those guys who turns his machine all the way up and works really really quickly,” Perleberg said. “It hurts an awful lot more than anything else, and it’s all freehand, so it’s really impressive.”

Perleberg said, prior to getting the tattoo, he had admired the celebrity artist, who travels around the world tattooing people.

“I’d seen him do tattoos like this before, and I thought they looked really great,” Perleberg said. “I’d always wanted to get one done by him. I told him to just go nuts with it.”

Dominic Dorsa

To commemorate his high school band, Plan II and neuroscience freshman Dominic Dorsa got a moonshine bottle tattooed on his right shoulder. The initials in the middle stand for the band’s founder, Kyrin Scott.

“We were in this fake band called Chesty and the Moonshiners. Chesty was [Kyrin’s] nickname,” Dorsa said. “We would only play at open mic nights, and we would only play one song, “Wagon Wheel,” over and over again.”

Dorsa said the band would welcome anyone willing to play an instrument. They would stuff 15 people on stage at a time and play guitars, banjos and other folk instruments.

“We were really trolling people,” Dorsa said. “We have a continuing group text, and we are all doing our own thing now. Some of us are at Baylor, some of us are at A&M, but we all still keep in touch.”