Quotes to note: Perry, Fisher vs UT, David Ash

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“We’re talking about basic primary things that everyone should be entitled to, and it really shouldn’t be attached to any political or religious agenda.”
— Dr. Tamarah Duperval-Brownlee, chief medical officer of Lone Star Circle of Care, on the reduced funding for Planned Parenthood Clinics in Texas, according to The Texas Tribune.

“We are right on plan where we planned to be.”
— Dave Carney, Gov. Rick Perry’s chief campaign strategist, challenging the assertion that Perry’s campaign peaked early and has since fizzled, according to The Washington Post.

“When you’re the guy, it’s different than when you’re just going in every once in a while taking a snap and running off the field. You’re out there the whole time. There’s no time to relax. You’ve got to be focused for an entire game and I’m learning to do that.”
— UT quarterback David Ash, according to The Daily Texan. After alternating with Case McCoy in the last few games, Ash took the reins of the offense full-time. Texas lost to Oklahoma State 38-26 on Saturday at Darrell K Royal Texas Memorial Stadium, dropping to 4-2 for the season.

“The part of diversity that matters to me and a lot of academics is the intellectual diversity of the classroom. The pursuit of a genuine variety of opinions that are well thought through and well grounded is essential. But that has an off-and-on, hit-or-miss connection with ethnic and racial diversity.”
— Anthropologist Peter Wood in relation to the upcoming Supreme Court case Abigail Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, according to The New York Times. Fisher, a white female, was denied admission to UT in 2008. If successful, Fisher’s case could overturn the 2003 Grutter v. Bollinger case at the University of Michigan, which prohibited the use of racial quotas in admissions decisions at universities but allowed race to be a factor because the court determined that a diverse student population is a “compelling government interest.”

“There is no longer any doubt as to the educational benefits of racially diverse students learning together and from each other.”
— John A. Payton, president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, according to The New York Times.